I can't eat duck

Discussion in 'Cooking Forum' started by whitedice, Sep 15, 2016.

  1. JP

    JP Elite Refuge Member

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    Reminds me of the quote attributed to W.C. Fields about cooking with wine.
     
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  2. whitedice

    whitedice Refuge Member

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    Trying this tonight. Just curious. Do you reheat the duck the next day or serve cold?

    Served with the salsa verde or is the excess removed?

    Thanks!
     
  3. CodyMIduckkid

    CodyMIduckkid New Member

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    Is it actually making you feel sick to your stomach or is it just that you don't like the taste, it may be that your stomach can't handle that type of meat
     
  4. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator Flyway Manager

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    It's up to you. I do this often during the season, which is why I never have any duck in the freezer. I make duck for dinner, and then the extra gets the salsa treatment and put in a baggie. Blind snacks for me, and the rancher where I hunt. I had some left over (for the drive home) one day he was working the fences. I talked him into tasting it (he hates duck) and he asked if I was bringing more the next day.

    You will find there is little salsa left over. The breading soaks most of it up. You can serve it cold, for snacks, or cut into bite size pieces and serve over noodles. The salsa, or whatever you use, really mellows out. Not much spicy taste left over. I don't know why that is.
     
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  5. whitedice

    whitedice Refuge Member

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    Just wanted to give a huge thank you to Native NV Ducker. Followed your guidelines on preparing the duck. Served it in a mushroom sauce with pasta. Only two things I will do differently next time. Less worcestershire in my mushroom sauce, and (I never thought I would say this) more duck! I loved it. The duck goes with this like no other meat could. Think I found a new favorite. Thanks man!
    20160922_193302.jpg
     
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  6. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator Flyway Manager

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    Glad you like it!!
    [​IMG]
     
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  7. snipe a duck

    snipe a duck Elite Refuge Member

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    This looks great do you mind sharing the recipe
     
  8. whitedice

    whitedice Refuge Member

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  9. gdluck

    gdluck Elite Refuge Member

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    I found that no matter the recipie I get the best results if the meat is bled thoroughly. I usually soak meat in plain water change water everyday until it's mostly clear after a 24 hour soak. You may want to turn the temp down on the fridge so it is about 37 degree.

    I use chunked meat in chili, stir fry etc. been getting into making sausage lately 70/30 mix with pork shoulder. also corning Canada breasts and making into pastrami.
     
  10. Squaller

    Squaller Elite Refuge Member

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    I really do believe there are regional differences...

    We call gadwall "gagwall," but in the Sacramento valley coming out of the rice fields, they were decent eating birds. Spoonies can go either way, but are "not bad" at best, and same with cinnamon teal. I have eaten birds of all three of the above species that were just plain awful. I know guys in other parts of the country consider scaup to be good birds on the table, but I consider eating them punishment for shooting them in my area.

    Pintail, gw teal, and canvasbacks make for excellent table fare in the valley with cans probably topping the list... In the coastal regions, my understanding is that canvasbacks are barely edible.

    Wood ducks in the foothills often are not that great eating (probably due to a diet made largely of acorns), but in the valley on the rivers, they are absolutely excellent on the table.
     

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