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Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by huntaholic21, Sep 16, 2016.

  1. Albino Woodie

    Albino Woodie Senior Refuge Member

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    It can be asking a lot but depending on what your trying to control, but it can be done. If your talking about weeds, a good spraying can control them depending on the spot. Timing of draw down really helps me out and will suppress some species and weeds. I manage for smartweed in most of my spots with wild millet mixed in some of these areas along with a few other desirable species scattered through out some of these spots. So, i do an early slow draw down, this early slow draw down helps with this type of management and species control. Some spots i have wild rice which is an entirely different management practice.

    So, timing and speed of draw down combined with some spraying (if needed) on focused areas instead of spraying the entire area works for me. I like supplemental planting of Jap millet as well in areas where nothing is really growing like on mud flats where weeds or less desirable species may pop up. Jap millet it's self "can" be a weed control. I use it to keep less desirable species off these mud flats by planting Jap millet a more desirable species.

    It can get pretty detailed and varies depending on the area and species your managing for, but this is what works for me and has worked for many years. There's a lot of different management practices but knowing what you have, your area and growing season, and what your managing for will dictate which practices to use. Basically having a management plan figured out before jumping in will save a lot of time and money.
     
  2. Fowlballer

    Fowlballer Elite Refuge Member

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    What about the plant density for subsequent years, seems like the more we disc the more grows.
     
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  3. Duckdstroyer

    Duckdstroyer Refuge Member

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    I understand why the timing of a draw down is important for managing SW, but what is the significance of the "slow" part?
     
  4. Albino Woodie

    Albino Woodie Senior Refuge Member

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    The slow part of a draw down in my area aids in suppressing weeds that can't grow in water and aids in suppressing other less desirable species due to timing and the slow process. Draw down fast and early, certain weeds/species could over run smartweed and other species me and the birds prefer. A slow draw down helps suppress them and keeps them from taking over.

    Smartweed and other early species can handle a "little" water. Basically using water to control weeds and other species. I spray a lot less this way. How fast or slow an area is allowed to draw down is just as important as the timing of the draw down. But, once again it goes back to what species are in the area and what your managing for that will dictate this and it's effectiveness. I hope i answered the question.
     
  5. Fowlballer

    Fowlballer Elite Refuge Member

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    A slow draw down just delays us from getting a disc in the fields.
     
  6. Albino Woodie

    Albino Woodie Senior Refuge Member

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    Once again, it depends on what kind of area you are managing and what your managing for. Obviously a slow draw down doesn't work for you. It works for me and we obviously have different management objectives and goals, so our practices will differ. I don't manage every area the same, i let what species are there and the goals i'm trying to achieve dictate how i manage an area. Some areas i can't get a tractor or a four wheeler in. So, an early, slow draw down is extremely effective.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2016
  7. DisplacedDuck

    DisplacedDuck Senior Refuge Member

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    I apologize in advance for the question that is probably a bit naive, but I've always been curious as to the possibility of an early draw down and a discing shortly thereafter to increase yield of moist soil plants.

    I've read a lot of literature that states that disc-ing a field in the summer will pretty much negate that field's natural seed production for the year, but what if the disc-ing were to take place after an early, fast drawdown? Or what if the field was drawn down immediately following the season, disked when dry, then reflooded for an appropriate 'drawdown' schedule?
     
  8. Fowlballer

    Fowlballer Elite Refuge Member

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    We've had a ton of success with our indigenous millet and smartweed with an early draw down and discing as soon as possible. You need weeks to get soil dry enough to get a disc in there and are area floods easily so you have to take what mother nature will give you. The areas we can't get dry is very susceptible to cattail and worthless dense cover the ducks never use.
     
  9. DisplacedDuck

    DisplacedDuck Senior Refuge Member

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    Will you put a shallow flood back on the field after the disking or just let it be?
     
  10. Fowlballer

    Fowlballer Elite Refuge Member

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    Let it be, it will hold water for a week every time we get a few inches. We leave the boards out until Sept 1
     

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