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Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by huntaholic21, Sep 16, 2016.

  1. Albino Woodie

    Albino Woodie Senior Refuge Member

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    Fowlballer is right, I'd let it be, especially if you are disking or mowing. You want the soil to dry out so you can get in and do work because you never know what the weather will throw at you. I wouldn't add water right after disking, most management areas will hold some water from rain fall. Now, if it's an extremely dry year you could add a little water "if" you have access to it to help things a long and keep the soil moist so you don't lose anything and help with growth, but that something you would need to gauge and time correctly.

    Some places i don't mow or disk every year either because of access or they because don't need it and i have them on a rotation which is why a like an early slow draw down in these areas which is beneficial for them.
     
  2. Fowlballer

    Fowlballer Elite Refuge Member

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    Any thoughts on early fall discing for future development?
     
  3. DisplacedDuck

    DisplacedDuck Senior Refuge Member

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    Unless I'm mistaken, discing in the summer or early fall is the recommended strategy for future development.

    The only downside to it is that the field in question will not have much, if any, waterfowl value until the NEXT growing season. So you would essentially 'bench' that field/area for a season. That is why some people who disc do so as early as possible, so they can get a planting of jap millet in to still utilize the field after a discing. It's sort of a two-for-one: the discing will aid in future yield of moist soil plants and planting the jap millet will still encourage waterfowl use.

    It could even lead to a three-for-one if lucky, as jap millet will volunteer in later seasons in some situations!
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2016
  4. Fowlballer

    Fowlballer Elite Refuge Member

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    We pounded the soil this spring until it was black powder, it was worth every hot miserable day.
     
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  5. Albino Woodie

    Albino Woodie Senior Refuge Member

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    Majority of the places i manage i do not get to fall disk much, just how landowners are due to hunting. They want some flooding for September goose and Teal seasons.

    Working with land owners trying to get them a good area established in the begining most will agree with a fall disking. Especially when it's explained to them it will help provide more food the next year and help control less desirable plants, but they hate the fact that it could reduce the amount of food available during hunting season. Once they see good establishment they want to stop fall disking and start flooding for September seasons.

    I like fall disking for developing an area, it's very beneficial. Depending on the area i prefer a to disk lightly in the fall compared to disking during the spring or summer.
     
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  6. DisplacedDuck

    DisplacedDuck Senior Refuge Member

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    Just for clarification, the indigenous millet and smartweed yield you're seeing is during the same year as the discing correct?
     
  7. Timber Hole

    Timber Hole Senior Refuge Member

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    I manage a small timber pool. The smartweed in the shallow end gets so thick it isn't even huntable. I don't do anything to it. It just happens naturally. Anyone else have this problem? Is there such a thing as too much of a good thing?
     
  8. DisplacedDuck

    DisplacedDuck Senior Refuge Member

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    Is there any way you could get in there and mow it? Mowing is a pretty common practice within moist soil management.
     
  9. Timber Hole

    Timber Hole Senior Refuge Member

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    I built a mower specifically for this purpose but it feels wrong to mow such a good food source. Is mowing SW a common practice for the purpose of showing more water?
     
  10. DisplacedDuck

    DisplacedDuck Senior Refuge Member

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    I would start a new thread pertaining to the topic as to attract the attention of some of the resident experts. But as far as my limited knowledge goes-the answer is yes. Mowing is most definitely utilized in the management of SW to both show water and manipulate seed abundance to wildlife.
     

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