Ideas for Home Made Mud Motor

Discussion in 'Mud Motors' started by Flutterin'_Wings, Oct 8, 2008.

  1. baileydog

    baileydog Elite Refuge Member

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    Birmingham
    California Dreaming.

    I had a 9HP GD-Long tail. Then a 18HP MBhyer drive. It was no contest.
    The long tail is better in only about 2% of the most situations. I hunt hard clay bottoms, Milfoil choked flats, Big water and stumpy swamps/ creeks. A short tail is way better and easier to drive. Speed is not even close. A 9 HP longtail will throw you out of the boat if you can not drive it well. The Hyper drive my 10 year old daughter can drive with one hand.

    I have moved up to a 36HP Pro-Drive now. It is very nice too. I considered a 23 HP Mini hyper drive- long and hard.
     
  2. dukill

    dukill Refuge Member

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    South Dakota
    Chestdeep,

    If you still have that part list I wouldnt mind a copy of it. I am thinking about diving into this project in the next couple of weeks. Just shoot me a pm. Thanks.
     
  3. chestdeep

    chestdeep Refuge Member

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    Alabama
    I will sit down and make another one up.
     
  4. Rainman

    Rainman Senior Refuge Member

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    Minnesota
    Hey chest could I get a list as well? Thanks


    Rainman
     
  5. Raul G

    Raul G Elite Refuge Member

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    Must be fun tinkering making your own design and I support your efforts wholeheartedly- this was the same way the present mfg.'s got started so they should welcome some competition. Some years ago my wife was showing me her video of a river run in Thailand. I saw some excellent designs, podlike protrusion on some wooden hull transoms and lots of longtails hauling azz. I have not been able to see a closeup of their setups but I still think the longtail was too soon abandoned here at home. I have several friends who still run longtails, including me, for the reasons Ibifishin1 cited. The shortail mfg.'s have overcome a lot of the initial problems: clutches, power trims, etc. and are now really sound machines. Getting older and losing arm strength might be one good incentive to getting a shortie.:D That said, last season my friend's balanced 35 MB Hyper had difficulty running through some hard skinny; the longtail in that sitution would have fared nominally better, at that point you are talking "airboat country", but, like was said, a small niche of the market out there and I understand the mfg.'s pulling out their capital from the longtail enterprise, inclusing any R&D- I still have a hard time accepting the notion that you can't improve upon the longtail some more. The hard sand/marl here will shred props in no time, shortail or longtail, no matter what Rockwell hardness. Though my friend's 24 Honda runs really smooth, he's had a host of problems with it unlike the Briggs or Kohler power plants.
     
  6. mallard79

    mallard79 Refuge Member

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    Washington
    Any chance I could get a copy of the list as well?

    Thanks!
     
  7. ALMODUX

    ALMODUX Elite Refuge Member

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    Hard bottom or soft, all of the shorttails I've owned and run ( three of the four main brands) will outperform all of the longtails I've owned and run. The only place where a longtail does better is when the transom leaves the water completely, such as high and dry on hard bottom, or stuck on a beaverdam because you decided to stop there in a shorttail (for some reason) or got stuck there because your longtail was too slow to begin with. In either case, the longer tail allows you to reach water, soft mud, etc. that's away from the transom, or to leverage yourself out with the tail. The skeg has beans to do with it. Shorttails have props that only need about 1/2 in the water to get at least some bite. They all have their place, and I'm, not being brand specific, either. IF you happen to add a rock guard to either type, you open up shallow water issues in hard bottom, but it's the same problem with either type: If you can't get the prop in it far enough, you can't go.:)
    There are also boat types/sizes and motor types and sizes that work better in combination. That also has beans to do with one being better than the other, but merely the combination working better TOGETHER.

    BTW:

    Chestdeep's plans work pretty good. His 5hp Honda longtail I bought was a screamer on my four rivers and pretty much bullet proof. Some fella in Gadsden has it now.
     
  8. Raul G

    Raul G Elite Refuge Member

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    Absolutely right, Almodux! We have skinny with hard bottom and at the end of winter, with water receding it becomes real tricky and then only airboats will do and I've been on several of those that got stuck- no picnic there. That is why for our relatively short runs, hard bottoms, the longtail is a good viable powerplant versus the shorties. The other areas where they are still a good ticket is where there are h.p. restrictions and those mini-longtails are cool. Unlike your bayou deep mud with skim water, where the shorty shines, even atop a heavy .125 hull, that same rig here, when stuck, is real stuck and a liability. I enjoy those mud videos filmed in the real thick mud because we don't have that, and I go around the occasional mud rafts here because they tend to stop you since they tend to be like hardened glue.
     

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