If I should change question

Discussion in 'Shooting - Reloading Forum' started by WK2HNT, Nov 29, 2017.

  1. WK2HNT

    WK2HNT Senior Refuge Member

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    I have always shot Kent 3.5 1625fps 1 1/4 oz #1 for years and been pleased out of my Benelli factory mod choke. On our Alberta trips this year all I shot was what the outfitter had which were Kent 3 inch 1550fps 1 1/4 oz BB and they shot great so I shot a couple of boxes of 3.5 inch 1550fps 1 3/8 oz BB last weekend and had good shooting on ducks and some geese so. Any thoughts on going from #1 shot to BB with a little slower speed but larger payload? Any one have the number of pellets in each shell ?
     
  2. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator Flyway Manager

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    1 3/8 bb's is 99 pellets
    1 1/4 bb's is 90 pellets
    1 1/4 1's is 129 pellets
    (bookmark this site for future reference)
    http://shotshell.drundel.com/pelletcount.htm

    I happen to be a big believer in pellet count. I 'own' a LOT of BB's, but I have not shot any in probably a decade. 2's is as large as I go. While I have only used my 20ga the last 4 years, my pellet choice would not change even if I were shooting the 12.

    Remember, pellets don't kill by shock. They kill by hitting a vital. Head and neck are the easiest vital to hit. More pellets really help there. Heart and lung are also vitals, and harder to get to, but smaller targets.

    From your past pellet choices, I am going to assume you are a believer in big pellets. That is fine. Tighter chokes keep pellet percentage in the kill circle high. Of course, they also mangle birds in close.

    What you 'need' to do is figure out how far you are shooting, and see what your patterns are doing at those ranges. LOTS of guys talk about shooting birds at 50 yards and beyond. That is a LONG way, and you need a tight choke to put enough pellets on the bird. Remember most shooters (nobody on these forums, of course) can't reliably hit birds beyond 27 yards.

    If your birds are inside 45 yards, 2's are all you need. I kill geese at 40 yards with my 20ga and 3's. As an example, 1 1/4oz of 2's bumps up to 156 pellets. I hunted Canada last year, and killed all my geese with a 20ga, using 4's for the first barrel, 3's for the 2nd. 1oz loads.

    Here is a thread with lots of info on it. Changed the way I look at my shell choices.
    http://www.refugeforums.com/threads/patterning-a-shotgun-concepts.903250/
     
  3. Ravenanme

    Ravenanme Elite Refuge Member

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    I can also say you're punishing yourself with recoil for no reason !
    If you can hit birds with the 1 1/4 oz of 1's at inside of 45 yds , you can do the same with 3's and with a 1 1/16 oz load coming out of a 2 3/4" hull
    it will kill ducks just as dead . I will grant you , those heavy loads you talk about in steel shot , do have their place in a 3" hull for Geese and on windy
    days . By adjusting the pattern density with choke constriction is a far simpler way to eliminate some of the recoil as the payload ( pattern density ) gives
    you a greater percentage of "dead in the air" birds ! What you're doing is called Magnum-itis !

    I believe those 3" 1 1/4 oz of Kent BB's were 1425 fps loads !
     
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  4. baltz526

    baltz526 Senior Refuge Member

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    I shoot a 10ga. If you can shoot the 3 1/2" 12ga comfortably there is no reason not to. #1 steel is a good choice. BB is a good choice. Faster is a good choice as long as it patterns well.
     
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  5. 10GAGENUT

    10GAGENUT Elite Refuge Member Sponsor Flyway Manager

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    Drundels page is very informative, however keep in mind also weights for steel shot vary and do quite often.
    Average weight for steel BB's can vary from 6.07 grains per pellet to 6.25 grains per pellet depending on who made the shot, which complicates things even more a bit.
    At 6.25 grains per pellet 1 3/8 oz of Steel BB's would be 96 pellets
    At 6.25 grains per pellet 1 1/4 oz would be 87 pellets
    Doesn't seem like much but in a large shot load 3 pellets can make a difference.
     
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  6. WK2HNT

    WK2HNT Senior Refuge Member

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    Thanks for the feedback guys. I am a pretty good sized fellow so the recoil has never bothered me using 3.5 inch shells. I shot #3 shot on opening day in Arkansas a couple of weeks ago and it was super windy and after about 15 shells I switched to the 1's and could tell a difference but we were having to reach out on some longer shots at geese.
     
  7. Ravenanme

    Ravenanme Elite Refuge Member

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    On windy days those 1625 fps #1's can be the ticket ....IF , you're shooting beyond 40 yds . The same load in the 3" at 1425 fps , I see very little difference

    Try them and see !
     
  8. Tuleman

    Tuleman Elite Refuge Member

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    So am I.
    If two different shot sizes will work, always go with the smaller of the two.

    That said, you'll have to pattern both loads to see which one gives you the best patterns in your gun/choke. A patterns with more shot in it will be no good if it's uneven and splotchy. Better to have a pattern with less percentage if its is evenly-disbursed.
     
  9. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator Flyway Manager

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    As always, good advice
     

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