Is this anti-opiate pain pill prescription prohibition designed to kill the chronically ill?

Discussion in 'Political Action Forum' started by Bear, Aug 31, 2017.

  1. hobbydog

    hobbydog Elite Refuge Member

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    I know that is definitely not true. Living proof.
     
  2. Bear

    Bear Elite Refuge Member

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    :yes:yes:yes

    Makes some that shoots up that maijiawana Zcitsoid and stoopid. That's why they be callin its dope.
     
  3. Bear

    Bear Elite Refuge Member

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    The substance only matters if the substance has substance.
     
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  4. Bear

    Bear Elite Refuge Member

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    This discussion assumes that people prescribed opiods will abuse them and become addicts. Many don't even finish their prescriptions as the cause of their pain has ceased. (opinion based on personal experience and others) If the end result was always addiction and that were the case then it would be the case which clearly it is not.

    It also becomes a question of what is best for the patient. That also includes what they are most comfortable with.

    I am most comfortable with opiod (legally prescribed) because of experience. That and I am not entirely sure medical THC is even prescription available in Texas.

    When I've over exerted, as I have during Hurricane Harvey, my muscles near my spine start to start pulling and I find I can't sleep. The pain starts me to overcompensate my other movements resulting in further issues.

    Now, I can't find any relief and therefore can't sleep more than a few hours.

    Anyway...the original thesis of this thread was the question about the possible reason the government and insurance industry might be restricting opiod availability.
     
  5. 10GAGENUT

    10GAGENUT Elite Refuge Member Flyway Manager

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    Yes sir that was your original post and I think I gave the correct response. Your in pain right now because the police and medical industry can't do their jobs..simple I guess.
     
  6. H20DAD

    H20DAD Elite Refuge Member

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    Don't confuse the definitions of addiction, abuse, and dependency.

    Addiction is a physiological or psychological issue.

    Abuse is an act which can be based upon psychological issues (liberalism)

    Dependency is again a physical or psychological issue.

    Repeated use of opioids will lead to addiction or dependency by physiologic mechanisms. Overcoming these issues depends upon many factors. Some people can easily walk away and just deal with their body going through mild withdrawal symptoms. As an example, a little diarrhea. Other cannot.
     
  7. Bear

    Bear Elite Refuge Member

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    I started to reference your post as an example of the original thread thesis. I also don't want to make this about me. There are folks on this forum in far worse "condition". I have no status comparatively. I stated my case because it was the best reference I have.

    H2ODAD provided some excellent information. If I understand his definitions correctly many are opiate dependent to prevent/assuage a chronic condition. Is that a bad thing? If so insulin dependence for diabetics is also.

    Slimm21 mentioned medical THC. If it does work why is the government preventing access to it? He projected a sense of frustration over access blocking. I believe he has a legitimate concern. The government has no remedy to offer...they just restrict...that creates more tragic situations. He came very close to supporting my original thesis.

    H20DAD and others have shown the percentage of possible addiction. At what level of percentage are severe restrictions imposed? And is dependence necessarily a bad thing if it allows people to function and be productive.

    Footnote: People are using firearms to protect themselves and their property now in Houston from looters and robbers. Travel and curfews AKA Martial law, is being imposed. It's AR-15s and high capacity magazines for pistols now protecting lives and properties in many areas. That and Brycos and Jennings in some less economically fortunate areas.

    If this was a severely restricted gun control state flood victims would have no defense against the human rats Harvey drove out of the sewers.
     
  8. cootmeurer

    cootmeurer Elite Refuge Member

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    Bear, while I understand that these work for you - your above statement is quite true. Based on the data that is out there, and my second hand experience listening to my wife (a prescriber) on a daily basis, Opioid prescriptions do result in a fairly significant percentage of people that abuse and/or become addicted. As others have said, there are probably better pain management solutions out there, but Opioids are a quick and easy script to write.

    Now, that being said - there are also a small subset of people that react very negatively to opioids (my family are all this way - we all report sensations of skin crawling, sleeplessness, extreme constipation, etc...). However, even when we tell a Doctor to NOT PRESCRIBE, we often end up with a script "just in case". Until the knee jerk reaction on prescribers is changed, it will keep feeding the problem.
     
  9. slimm21

    slimm21 Elite Refuge Member

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    The answer to your thesis is what I and several others have argued in this thread. The gov't should have never been in bed with big pharma on Opioids and many of us (and the gov't is coming around to this) believe there is an Opioid epidemic. That is why they are starting to restrict access ----- the statistics and research are showing that as a whole Opioid RXs are a major problem.

    I can't imagine your pain management issues and wish you well, but the individual methodology of how Opioid pain management has been handled isn't working.

    To make your personal example more extreme, Morphine would no doubt give you relief as it would others with chronic pain --- that doesn't mean individuals should have/be access and use of it at their disposal with an RX from the Dr.
     
  10. stevena198301

    stevena198301 Elite Refuge Member

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    And in trying to "fix" this problem, we are now seeing a lot of heroine overdoses with the middle-class-stay-at-home-mom types, etc. They can't get their Oxys, so they find a dealer who gets them heroine. Teenage/young adults are following suit. I just saw it destroy two young sisters lives. They come from a decently wealthy family. Had zero reason to get into that kind of mess. Both have OD'd (at least once). Both have been in and out of rehab. One got hooked on Oxys in high school, and her sister followed suit shortly thereafter. A terrible situation for the whole family. They were some fiiine lookin' girls. The youngest (19) was supermodel gorgeous. Now she looks like a crackhead.

    These opioids are in every high school, of every state. When I went through in the late 90s-early 00s, they were everywhere. You folks who were not in high school at that time have no idea how easily they were to get, and how many in school were doing them. They were never my drug of choice (I get the same sensations @cootmeurer spoke of, plus nausea, and I hated it). These were coming from kids who were either selling them for their parents (seriously), or stealing them from their parents, who were too clueless to realize they were missing.

    One of my good friends in high school was doing 320mg/day of OC when we were in 11th grade. And he could still function... We stopped being friends when he stole all my money and my sisters engagement ring one night. I haven't seen him since.

    Sorry to go off on a tangent... But this is a serious issue that should be addressed, and any option (whether it be medical MJ, or whatever else) is better than what we have now.
     

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