It appears the Senate just passed a two year budget for the USA.

Discussion in 'Political Action Forum' started by Bear, Feb 7, 2018.

  1. Bear

    Bear Elite Refuge Member

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    God Bless Texas!!!
  2. widgeon

    widgeon Elite Refuge Member

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    Schumer likes it. We're doomed.
     
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  3. pointblind

    pointblind Elite Refuge Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  4. hartfish

    hartfish Elite Refuge Member

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    At least a few Republicans get it.
    Will Trump confirm that he has no interest in controlling spending by signing this bill?

    Conservatives slam budget deal
    "This budget deal is a betrayal of everything limited government conservatism stands for and I will be voting no,” said Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah).
    A slew of House conservatives stood up in a closed-door Republican Conference meeting Wednesday to chide Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and his team on the package, which would increase spending on defense and domestic programs. One of those was House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-Texas), a longtime Ryan ally, who argued that the plan would balloon the nation’s more than $20 trillion debt.
    Hensarling was far from alone. As Republicans exited the meeting, many decried the proposal as a betrayal of the party's commitment to fiscal responsibility. House Freedom Caucus member Dave Brat (R-Va.) called it “a Christmas tree on steroids.” And group leader Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) called the agreement a “monstrosity.”
    Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) called it “a terrible, no good, rotten way to run your government.”
    “It’s a really bad idea to blow through the budget caps," Paul said. "It’s bad for the country.”
    https://www.politico.com/story/2018/02/07/conservatives-slam-budget-deal-397452
     
    The_Duck_Master and pintail2222 like this.
  5. KENNEDY63

    KENNEDY63 Elite Refuge Member

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    What’s in the Bipartisan Spending Deal
    Details on what leaders have agreed to fund

    By Kristina Peterson and
    Natalie Andrews
    Feb. 7, 2018 11:20 p.m. ET

    The two-year budget deal unveiled Wednesday will provide the parameters for more detailed spending legislation lawmakers will write in the coming weeks. Here are details on what the deal directs lawmakers to include. The plan:

    •Increases military spending by $80 billion in this fiscal year and $85 billion in fiscal year 2019, plus $140 billion over two years for an emergency war fund.

    •Increases domestic spending by $63 billion this fiscal year and $68 billion the following year.

    Some of those domestic funds are targeted for specific needs, including:

    •$6 billion over two years to fight the opioid epidemic and for mental-health issues.

    •$4 billion over two years to rebuild and improve veterans’ hospitals and clinics.

    •$2 billion over two years for National Institutes of Health research.

    •$20 billion over two years for infrastructure improvements including rural broadband, roads and highways, and drinking water.

    •$4 billion for programs to make college more affordable and help people graduate.

    In addition, the agreement:

    •Boosts funding for community health centers for two years.

    •Lengthens the reauthorization of the Children’s Health Insurance Program to 10 years from six.

    The deal also:

    •Suspends the debt ceiling through March 1, 2019.

    •Directs almost $90 billion to help states affected by hurricanes and wildfires last year, including $23.5 billion into Federal Emergency Management Agency’s disaster-relief fund for recovery, repairs and future mitigation of disasters. The disaster aid includes $28 billion in community development block grants for housing and infrastructure repairs. Of that, $2 billion is specifically for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands’ electrical grids.

    •Is expected to extend some tax breaks that expired at the end of 2016. The extensions would go only through tax year 2017.

    •Sets up joint committees to hash out some thorny problems, including multiemployer pension problems and changes to the congressional budget process.

    Write to Kristina Peterson at kristina.peterson@wsj.com and Natalie Andrews at Natalie.Andrews@wsj.com
     
  6. KENNEDY63

    KENNEDY63 Elite Refuge Member

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    Not directed at you, but - do any Dems or moderates "get it"? Or do they just appear to "get it" when trolling the PAF?:l

    My guess is that, IF a bill of this nature is presented to Trump in the next few weeks - he will sign it.

    He built his empire on debt.
     
  7. KENNEDY63

    KENNEDY63 Elite Refuge Member

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    Another take. I love the last line......

    The Guns and Butter Budget
    Democrats exact a high price for agreeing to boost the military.

    By The Editorial Board
    Feb. 7, 2018 7:09 p.m. ET

    Congress announced the outline of a two-year bipartisan budget deal on Wednesday, and no doubt Members want to avoid another pointless government shutdown. The deal has the virtue of starting to fix a weakening military. But the delusion is that the U.S. can continue to deny the trade-off between guns and butter, or defense and the entitlement state.

    ***
    First, the good news: The budget outline would lift defense spending by $80 billion in fiscal 2018 and $85 billion in 2019, honoring a central GOP campaign promise. This busts the “sequester caps” that forced useful restraint on domestic accounts for a few years but damaged the military and did nothing on entitlements.

    Military leaders have all but invaded Capitol Hill to say that unreliable and lower funding has eroded readiness in every area from aircraft to munitions. Some of this is not a matter of fixing old equipment: Training delayed by shutdowns or other shortfalls leads to personnel who miss opportunities to build proficiency and skill, which Defense Secretary Jim Mattis explained to reporters at the White House Wednesday. Training accidents and deaths have increased in recent years well above the normal risks of service.

    This renovation is sorely needed, though it comes at a high price. Democrats backed up the truck for funding on everything from community health centers to billions on child-care grants to $20 billion for infrastructure. The tally comes to $131 billion more in discretionary spending over the next two years. Democrats wanted dollar for dollar parity with defense spending. So in the silver-lining department the GOP at least managed to get more for the Pentagon, where cuts have been harsher.

    On the long list of the Democratic haul: An additional four-year extension for the children’s health insurance program, or CHIP, which was recently extended for six years. That means 10 more years of a separate health program for children, though many Democrats said that ObamaCare would provide affordable coverage that would make the CHIP program unnecessary. Now we get both for the long run.

    Speaker Paul Ryan noted in a press-release pitch that the GOP steered some of the funding toward Republican priorities, including maintenance backlogs at veterans hospitals. Also $2 billion for research at the National Institutes of Health, and a better flu vaccine is looking like a good idea this month. Add to this about $90 billion in disaster relief. That money to rebuild Texas, Florida and other areas would have been whooped through Congress sooner or later, even if plenty of it is sure to be wasted.

    The deal also includes $6 billion for the opioid crisis, though it’s hardly clear that communities or the health-care system are prepared to absorb more cash. Congress allocated $1 billion for state grants in a 2016 law, and little is understood about what this funding has accomplished. For now this spending is a bipartisan hall pass for not having to think about tougher problems like why so many Americans are declining treatment and overdosing multiple times.

    One good development is that Republicans managed to include the repeal of ObamaCare’s Independent Advisory Payment Board, known as IPAB. The Obama central planners created this panel of bureaucrats to impose price controls on Medicare and it represents everything Americans hate about the Affordable Care Act: political rationing over individual choice.

    IPAB was designed so its decisions would be nearly impossible for Congress to overrule. Repeal gives Republicans another health-care achievement to tout in the 2018 midterms, in addition to zeroing out the law’s penalty for declining to buy insurance as part of tax reform. Oh, and the deal raises the debt limit into 2019, which avoids another useless melodrama.

    The politics of passing this deal could nonetheless get ugly. The Freedom Caucus is already squawking, and they have a point. The id of their membership is less spending, whether on defense or food stamps makes little difference. The problem is that their opposition hands leverage to Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who is trying to blow it up because it doesn’t include an immigration deal over the young adult “Dreamers” brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

    ***
    The larger fiscal reality is the continuing failure to reform entitlements, which absorb an ever-rising share of GDP and federal budget and present the true threat to national defense. President Obama blocked reform, and then the GOP missed the best chance in a generation to fix Medicaid by replacing the Affordable Care Act. The politics of reforming that entitlement is easy compared with Medicare and Social Security.

    The annual budget deficit is cruising toward a cool $1 trillion, yet some Republicans are flirting with adding another new entitlement called paid family leave. The GOP’s best hope is that tax reform can deliver at least 3% growth and delay the fiscal reckoning. Republicans have to handle the urgent task of rebuilding the military in a dangerous world, but one certainty: Entitlement reform must happen, or we’ll be defending ourselves against Kim Jong Un’s nuclear missiles with Medicare checks.

    Appeared in the February 8, 2018, print edition.
     
  8. buck_master_2001

    buck_master_2001 Elite Refuge Member

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    It looks like both sides voted to continue to flush our nation down the crapper. They keep proving the point that in the end there’s very little difference between the two sides.
     
  9. Ron Gilmore

    Ron Gilmore Elite Refuge Member

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    So let me get this straight?? We have a Congress who since Newt left has shown no willingness to control spending and people are surprised with this budget??? Even more surprised that Trump would sign it???


    I never expected anything less and it is because the majority of voters don't see debt and the problems it brings as an issue. There is no stomach for hard cuts and choices as was discussed in another thread. REP Freedom Caucus is a very minority group, correct but minority and will become an even smaller minority if they cause a shutdown. So they are doing what they always do, caterwaul, puff out the chest but when nut cutting time comes some will fold to allow it to move forward!

    They cant lay this on Trump so self preservation will kick in!!!!
     
  10. buck_master_2001

    buck_master_2001 Elite Refuge Member

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    Not blaming trump. I’m blaming both sides. You’re right. Nobody wants to make the sacrifices needed to control the debt. Whats good for one person is bad for another. Truly eliminating our debt would be political suicide.
     

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