Jonh Deere 7000 Planter??

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by GooseNukem, Aug 30, 2017.

  1. GooseNukem

    GooseNukem Refuge Member

    Messages:
    32
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2017
    Location:
    Western Lake Erie Basin
    The last two years I've been planting with a John Deere 7000 six row planter and each year there has been some spots where it looks like it wasn't putting the correct population down for the corn is quite thin. Now the more I think about it, both spots would have been at a point in the field where the seed in the bins would have been getting quite low. Its a finger pickup but my question is, does the amount of seed in the bins effect how the machine is putting the seed down?
     
  2. HOLYSTEEL

    HOLYSTEEL Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    104
    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2004
    Location:
    NW IN
    Haven't seen that being a problem. What you need to do is have your meters calibrated. It's amazing how things can change. Parts get worn out, the nut is too tight, the adjustable brush is on the wrong setting, the meter wasn't cleaned out properly, don't have the correct plate in, etc... When they are calibrating them, all these things are taken into account and can be dialed in for the seed that you will be planting. So make sure that you have the seed that you'll be planting with you. While they are calibrating them, you can watch on the monitor and see all the skips and doubles. The reason I'm thinking it's not a problem is because, when they are being calibrated, there is usually only a small amout of seed being used. If the bins are getting low and the planter is bouncing around, that could create issues. Does the grade change in these locations? If the planter isn't level, you could be burying the seeds too deep. Finger pickups are great, but depending on the seed, they don't always work great. It's worth having them calibrated, especially if you don't have a monitor on your planter. You also need to get off the tractor and dig up some seeds, to verify seed planting depth and spacing. There are alot of factors that influence a good stand and your planter has control over alot of them. There are a bunch of planters out there for sale with new paint jobs on them with a bunch of worn out parts. Take a look at Youtube on planter adjustments, they have been extremely helpful. Another thing to be mindful of is your planting speed. When they calibrate the meters, you'll beable to see what the best planting speeds are for the different combinations you'll be using. Also, DOCUMENT what you do so you can repeat what works. Just remember, parts wear out and things change. The winter is when to start getting your planter ready for the next season. Good luck!
     
    jzoo and WHUP ! Hen like this.
  3. WHUP ! Hen

    WHUP ! Hen Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,183
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2007
    Location:
    Northeast Missouri
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    Good farmer......knows JD 7000. Good advise.
     
  4. HOLYSTEEL

    HOLYSTEEL Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    104
    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2004
    Location:
    NW IN
    Learned the hard way. Brought one that was modified for food plots and "ready to go". Well I really didn't know any better. Most of the pulleys were worn out, some of the chains had bound up links, the opening disks were worn down beyond their tolerances, the meters were pieced together with worn parts, etc. I've spent a lot of time and money replacing and upgrading my planter. It's a lot more consistent, but still needs a few more items. I plant in pretty difficult conditions, as do most guys planting food plots for waterfowl. Even though I don't harvest anything, I still want the best yield I can get. It costs too much too put this stuff in the ground not to (seed, herbicide, fertilizer, fuel, equipment, repairs, etc.) want the best yield that's reasonable. I know it's difficult but you have to tune your planter in the off season before you need it, your window for planting is extremely tight, not a good time to be working on equipment. Always get off the tractor and see where those seeds are and how deep they are. Nothing worse then planting a field and coming back in a week or so and, nothing. Plant a row or portion of it, if something is wrong you can correct it. Have an idea about how much seed you should use for that field and check it periodically.
     
  5. HuntTilDusk

    HuntTilDusk New Member

    Messages:
    23
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2014
    Location:
    Iowa
    I have had problems when I get low on my JD 7000 4 row monitor will go off here and there. its like sometimes the seed wont fall to the cups. I wonder if you spray graphite the inside of the hopper or just add talc. I did have some seed that a farmer gave to me and had too much talc added and it played hell with my monitor so I think if I were to try something ill spray graphite my hopper
     

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