Lab prices

Discussion in 'Gun Dog Forum' started by XtremaGoose, Dec 26, 2016.

  1. XtremaGoose

    XtremaGoose Senior Refuge Member

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    Have Lab prices gone up that much? My dog was put down last week due to cancer, and I have been looking for a replacement but notice how much money everyone wants. I bread my dogs a few times and sold them for 400 to 500 a piece didn't seem to have any problem getting that. But I have not seen anything around that price range. I had paid 450 for my other lab which was the pick of the litter but that was 10 years ago, I paid 350 for my female and they have both been wonderful dogs but now I need to dog for my other one and to get trained up for the other is 9 and I know her days hunting are getting numbered.
     
  2. FieldLabLover

    FieldLabLover Elite Refuge Member

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    Food has doubled or maybe more, vets maybe more than doubled, and there are more health certs needed. How many things cost the same as 10 years ago? I sold my first pups for $350....35 years ago, with health certs. You can always go to the local newspaper and take your chances
     
  3. Timber Hole

    Timber Hole Senior Refuge Member

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    I got my pup off craigslist. Probably not the smartest way to go but being new I didn't know what I didn't know. Pup is great so far.....still paid $300.00.
     
  4. CA Birdman

    CA Birdman Elite Refuge Member

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    The price for the pup is the cheapest part of the equation. What you are buying is a pedigree with health clearances. You are just tilting the odds in your favor that your pup will turn out to be a decent dog in the field versus a crap shoot taking a puppy from the pound and you reduce chance of hereditary diseases like hip, EIC, etc.
     
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  5. ABREOJOS

    ABREOJOS Elite Refuge Member

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    it comes down to the expectations of the dog. If you are only looking for a dog that can keep your feet dry by going out retrieving birds that splash down in open water in the vicinity of the dekes, then you are probably OK with a cheaper breeding. You still have to worry about health clearances from the sire and dam. The trend is - The better the breeding, the easier the training. The market for Labs took a big increase in prices when the U.S. Military started buying up the a lot of the decent breedings for bomb dogs. It never fell back down to the old levels.

    You need some objective evidence that the dog comes from stock that still has the retriever instincts. Performance titles are the best way to determine this unless you are very familiar with both the parents. Do not take the word of the owners. People love their dogs and very often attribute abilities to them well beyond reality.

    If cost of the pup is a big factor, take your time. It would be a real crap shoot to buy a $400 dog off of Craig's List. Go to a hunt test in the area and ask about upcoming litters. Follow retriever ads in RTF and other forums. Utah is a good place to for pup hunting if you are willing to travel in a few hundred mile radius to pick up the pup. If the cheap dog does not work out, then it will cost more when you buy a second pup.

    If you can afford $800 for a pup you should not have a problem getting a good one. I have a friend that is selling his pups for $800 and they sired by an FC. This is one of those deals that comes along from time to time where the breeder is not that interested in maximizing profit.
     
  6. WHUP ! Hen

    WHUP ! Hen Elite Refuge Member

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    A good dog doesn't eat any more than a knot head, make your choice wisely. Very tough.
     
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  7. montana bound

    montana bound Senior Refuge Member

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    What do you call high priced?
    The 2 males we have in our kennel for breeding, cost $1000 each.
    The oldest is 4 he has OFFA normal elbows and Excellent hips, also EIC , CNM and PRA clear.
    The other male will have his OFFA done this summer, but is EIC, CNM and PRA clear.
    They have hunt tests in their back ground .
    Our females all have their elbow and hip certs and been tested for EIC , CNM and PRA. Our females are all 2nd and 3rd generation dogs here.
    These tests cost Money as does raising the dogs. Our kennels with dog box cost me $2000 each and I built them myself. We have ten of those , plus a building and about a acer fenced in for them to air out in.
    If you think $800 - $1000 for a dog with this kind of work done to the parents is high, then I don't know what to tell someone looking for a dog. We hunt our dogs hard, mostly upland with some waterfowl and so do most of the people who have our dogs.
    you will get what you pay for.
    The price of the dog is a drop in the bucket in the life of the dog.
    You can go cheap and get a dog with nothing done health wise, you may luck out and get a good dog or you may get a bad apple and then wish you had put out a little more.
     
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  8. Timber Hole

    Timber Hole Senior Refuge Member

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    So here is my question. If you spend the money to get a pup with health clearances, what are the odds that you end up with a dog without health problems? I do understand that the work and money to breed out the health issues makes sense but how much does it improve the odds? I have read multiple posts on this forum about registered dogs that had health issues.
     
  9. ABREOJOS

    ABREOJOS Elite Refuge Member

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    Testing greatly increases the odds of avoiding the diseases such as EIC, dysplasia & severe eye problems. The EIC threat is eliminated by testing. The odds of getting hip dysplasia is exponentially reduced when breeding excellent to excellent versus good to good. The odds get worse when breeding dysplastic to good. While OFA & CERF testing does not eliminate the threat of eye or hip and elbow problems, it tremendously decreases the chances of an occurrence.
     
  10. Hogleg

    Hogleg Senior Refuge Member

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    The odds are low, but it can happen. I have a one year old CBR with bad hips. Parents were both OFA good, she was $750. Just purchased another, she was $800 with all the clearances.

    It's the risk you run. The guarantees are great, just tell your wife and kids you're going to give the dog back and see how well that flies. Not knocking breeders, it's a live animal, you can't just trade it in, but it's not like a guarantee on a car.

    Had a good friend that is a vet fix my old labs knee this summer. Went great, he did it for cost. TPLO. Then she came down with bone cancer and had to be put down. I've had terrible luck lately. Hoping for the best with the new girl.

    Do your research, don't buy on price alone, give yourself the best chance for a healthy dog that has it in their genes to do the job you want done. That being said there are tons of great working dogs out there without a bunch of letters behind their parents name.
     

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