Lead shot ban for dove hunting

Discussion in 'Hunters Rights Forum' started by lanthanide, Dec 11, 2014.

  1. Redhead78

    Redhead78 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,537
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2007
    Location:
    Mexican on his way to Oklahoma
    I have not been involved in this discussion, and have not read every post on the thread. However, I will say that my experience with lead and wildlife has not been laced with toxicity.

    I have a good friend that owns a sporting clay range and gun shop. Last year his club held the state sporting clay championship with nearly 300 shooters. He has had a public course for nearly 30 years and I'd hate to guess how many pounds of lead lie on the ground. Anyway, about 7-8 years ago, my good friend decided to build a wetland on his property. He floods about 10-12 acres annually and holds a decent number of ducks and geese. There are typically 25-50 shooters on the property daily during most months of the year. NEVER, not once has anyone ever seen a bird or animal suffering from lead poisoning. I'm not saying this constitutes a scientific study, but one would think on an area that littered with lead pellets, that some of these birds would ingest enough lead to get sick.

    Like Cooksey, I'm just not convinced the risk of toxicity exists across the board. In some areas, perhaps but lead (in the form of shotgun pellets) is not the evil villian the EPA and liberal states have made it out to be.
     
  2. tcc

    tcc Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    7,164
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2006
    Location:
    Louisiana
    If you'd read all of the thread you'd know the poisoned ones aren't as wary and are the ones the hunters shot. The rest just hide real good so you'll never see them. :rolleyes:
     
  3. Redhead78

    Redhead78 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,537
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2007
    Location:
    Mexican on his way to Oklahoma
    I know you are simply being sarcastic, but if you ever saw this area you'd know that is not very realistic. First of all, he doesn't hunt this wetland. It is simply used for a refuge/sactuary. Second, the area in question does not offer much in the way of cover. Hiding places for sick birds would be virtually non-existent. If lead poisoning is/was taking place in this area, somebody would find a sick bird here or there.
     
  4. tcc

    tcc Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    7,164
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2006
    Location:
    Louisiana
    Haha, I'm just relaying what the thread experts have told us.:tu
     
  5. marsh fox

    marsh fox Banned

    Messages:
    6,323
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2005
    Location:
    New Zealand
    With reference to your coment, it may be prudent if you read this interesting file.
    http://www.countryside-alliance.org/ca/file/CaseForLead2013.pdf
     
  6. marsh fox

    marsh fox Banned

    Messages:
    6,323
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2005
    Location:
    New Zealand
  7. Kemo Sabe

    Kemo Sabe Refuge Member

    Messages:
    67
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2014
    Location:
    California
    http://bangordailynews.com/2014/11/13/outdoors/bald-eagle-found-in-howland-dies-of-lead-poisoning/
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2014
  8. hartfish

    hartfish Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,596
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2005
    Location:
    virginia
  9. Kemo Sabe

    Kemo Sabe Refuge Member

    Messages:
    67
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2014
    Location:
    California
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2014
  10. hartfish

    hartfish Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,596
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2005
    Location:
    virginia
    http://www.nawindpower.com/e107_plugins/content/content.php?content.13781

    According to the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), the charges stem from the discovery of the carcasses of 38 golden eagles and 336 other protected birds, including hawks, blackbirds, larks, wrens and sparrows, by the company at its Seven Mile Hill and Glenrock/Rolling Hills wind projects, located in Wyoming's Carbon and Converse counties between 2009 and the present.
     

Share This Page