Lease prices

Discussion in 'Goose Hunting Forum' started by Rich5294p, Mar 5, 2016.

  1. Rich5294p

    Rich5294p Refuge Member

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    what would you say would be a fair price for the year for a goose lease. Also those of you that lease property to hunt, is it on a handshake or a contract?
     
  2. ED Vanderbeck

    ED Vanderbeck Senior Refuge Member

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    Where you at makes a little difference are you at squaw Creek or in the desert of Arizona or quivira that is pretty relevant to the cost in my mind
     
  3. Rich5294p

    Rich5294p Refuge Member

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  4. easternshorerednek

    easternshorerednek Elite Refuge Member

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    The Eastern Shore of Md has some of the most expensive goose leases in the entire country. A pit can go from anywhere between $2500-5000. A whole farm can go for much more depending on location and water such as ponds, streams, or shoreline. With these warmer winters and extreme hunting pressure I look for the leases to drop a little in the years to come.
     
  5. Rich5294p

    Rich5294p Refuge Member

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    Yeah I figured maybe $1000 to $2500 here but imo what I'm will ing to pay is depending on a lot of factors. Like if I can put a pit in.
     
  6. jjseman

    jjseman Senior Refuge Member

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    Zero $$$!!!!!
    You're just feeding the monster by leasing land to hunt. The more people leasing farms creates a market where one did not exist. Free access to hunt properties will/is becoming a thing of the past if hunters continue to lease out properties.
    Right now things may seem "affordable" (a subjective term), don't expect it to stay that way when the guy down the road offers the farmer more money to hunt "your lease".
    Look at the once famous Pike County in Illinois. It was argueably the white tail capital of the US. Word got out of the quality bucks that were on every hunting show/magazine article. The resident hunters soon were displaced by non resident lessees from out of state.
    What happened to establishing a relationship with property owners/farmers who's land you hunt? I have properties that I've hunted for 10+ years that I cherish each of them for the many memories. I have fostered good friendships with the landowners. It's not a seasonal contract that I need to renew for access.
    Land access is one of the primary reasons for the decline in hunter's numbers. I can afford to lease some good looking properties, but I refuse to, on principle.
     
  7. Rich5294p

    Rich5294p Refuge Member

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    Unfortunately here on Long Island that's about the only way to get a field.
     
  8. Waterdog Trainer

    Waterdog Trainer Senior Refuge Member

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    Sadly, that ship has already set sail many years ago in our area.

    I am familiar with leases but not in NY so I can't comment on value. There are many contributing factors to the cost of a lease. I'm sure there is a certain amount of disparity in cost depending on geographical location. You need to research your area and see what others are paying on the high and low end. Do your homework before you approach the landowner.
     
  9. Rich5294p

    Rich5294p Refuge Member

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    Yeah most properties seem to be "bought " up by guides. Everyone I've talked to has been hush hush on what they pay. Guess they are afraid of a bidding war
     
    Bruno1 likes this.
  10. jjseman

    jjseman Senior Refuge Member

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    That's what is going to happen whether they like it or not. A bidding war among the guides will ensue. Groups of hunters will form small "co-opps" or throw together some crappy "hunter group LLC" and out bid individuals for choice properties. The average Joe Hunter is going to get the scraps or congest the already crowded public lands further. I'm not going to join the "can't beat 'em, join 'em" band wagon. I urge others to do the same. I understand leasing has already began to show its ugly face in our sport. At least we can try to slow down the cancer.
     
    SmokinGreen and twild like this.

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