Lining corrections

Discussion in 'Gun Dog Forum' started by UKlabman, Apr 6, 2011.

  1. UKlabman

    UKlabman Elite Refuge Member

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    At what point and with what method is best to correct lining errors. I am referring to cold blind lining. Pup (10 1/2 mo) is doing pretty well after lots of pattern blind work and wagon wheel drills, etc. and easily goes 200 yds on a pattern blind. She will however veer off course some on a true cold blind. Is it best to stop and re-direct as soon as she has gone a bit off course or wait until she is at the desired distance, then stop and give an "over"? Obviously I want her to get to the area of fall with as little handling as possible. No tests or trials intended, just lots of hunting.

    Thanks
     
  2. Long Shot

    Long Shot Senior Refuge Member

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    The longer you allow a dog to run off line the harder it is to change his line. Don't allow the dog to run off line & hope for a big correction to get back on line.
     
  3. dukdogz

    dukdogz Senior Refuge Member

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    Challenge the line always
     
  4. UKlabman

    UKlabman Elite Refuge Member

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    I understand the reasoning but not the cure. If for instance the cold blind os out there 80 yds and at 40 the pup has veered off 15-20 degrees. Stop her with whistle and handle back to the line?
     
  5. KwickLabs

    KwickLabs Elite Refuge Member

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    For me with a pup in transition (not thinking about age here), it is about maintaining balance between momentum and precision. The goal is to preserve "mo" and strive gradually for precision.

    My favorite practice at this stage (200 yards) is to set out a "wide" fan of at least six cold blinds. The pup is "lined up" for the middle one and whichever way he goes, "mo" is the focus. He will probably end up near one (unless he really goes astray) and you then handle him to it (whichever one it is). It probably won't be the one in the middle, but if it is all the better.

    Then I would send at least one more time because there are still a lot of cold blinds left. Repeat with the same focus......."GO and I don't care which way". Then handle near the end. During this time you should be able to observe just how well his body position (aim) is progressing.

    Early on, I pick up the remaining bumpers. From my experience, it won't be long before you will have sessions where you won't have to retrieve leftovers. Of course this is only one of many things you might be doing in training. Balance between lining drills, lots of marking and maintaining OB would be called for. I don't do this lesson multiple days in a row.

    I do this in different areas everytime and avoid as many factors as possible for awhile. Each new setup has the same focus "mo" first and precision gradually. After "reps", the dog's initial lines will improve (some faster than others). Momentum is maintained and confidence soars because it's very difficult for him to be wrong and easier for you to not be too "picky"....too soon.

    The key to this process is to know when to increase your demands for more precision. If he is confident, stopping sooner to ask for more precision will not make you out to be such a "wet blanket".
     
  6. UKlabman

    UKlabman Elite Refuge Member

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    That makes a lot of sense. Just so I am really on the same page, to be a "cold" blind the pup can not see the bumpers placed at all, or even the general area, correct?
     
  7. dukdogz

    dukdogz Senior Refuge Member

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    When I am running blinds while training I usually will not even let them get 20 degrees of, I will correct the line very very early. Now I give them a little more when running a hunt test but in training I think to many people call it "good enough" training is where you tune everything it. What we don't correct when training only gets magnified 2 fold when hunting or running tests.
     
  8. KwickLabs

    KwickLabs Elite Refuge Member

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    What is heard often is "challenge the blind". However, this is the "mantra" for a fully trained dog (not a pup). Precision is a gradually developed skill when fairly taught. The best way to have a finished dog that can capably
    "challenge the blind" with style is to teach first and then test. I don't
    know how many times I've told training partners to "let the (insert choice word) pup roll some before you blow the whistle". Retriever trainers have a penchant to be labeled "control freaks". If some pups could respond to that issue, they'd agree.

    There's an old saying "If you teach a child to always color inside the lines, he'll have a much more difficult time becoming an artist." :yes
     
  9. UKlabman

    UKlabman Elite Refuge Member

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    That gives me a lot of comfort, knowing I don't need to slow down her mojo. Busy times these days-dog training, turkey scouting, fishing. My what a dilemma.
     
  10. DeWayne Knight

    DeWayne Knight Elite Refuge Member

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    I'm gonna have to remember that last remark...:tu
     

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