Manipulating jap millett

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by Happy First Timer, Sep 21, 2017.

  1. Happy First Timer

    Happy First Timer Elite Refuge Member

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    I have about 4 acres of really good jap millet that came up volunteer this spring that was left over seed from last year's food plot. Since it is volunteer, the rules allow for it to be manipulated for waterfowl this year.

    What are some ways to manipulate jap millet to make it more attractive to ducks? We have never had a volunteer crop that was good enough to do anything with so this is a first for us. Any suggestions?
     
  2. Porter Bayou

    Porter Bayou Senior Refuge Member

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    Let it be
     
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  3. hannibal

    hannibal Senior Refuge Member

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    I would mow it at some point prior to season. At least 2/3 of it and put shallow water on it. Ducks will find it and may prevent the blackbirds from eating 95% of it if you get it down and watwr on it.
     
  4. JFG

    JFG Elite Refuge Member

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    My first thought was to do nothing also. But I don't know the particulars of your area and the pond so hard to say what's "best". But if b birds are a past problem, not a bad idea at all to "get it down" before they rape it. On the other hand if you're in a fairly warm climate such as I am, putting it in water early can cause unwanted germination of a significant portion, especially of the seed heads that remain intact. That's been my experience anyway.
     
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  5. Happy First Timer

    Happy First Timer Elite Refuge Member

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    I have left it so far. There have been a few small birds in it, but not any back birds yet. There is some taller grass and some cockle burrs mixed in it that may help shield it from any black birds that show up. I had milo in there a few years ago and they ate every piece of grain off of it before the first of november. It was a total waste. I haven't planted any more of it.

    Corn is my favorite. I planted some in there mid July when it finally dried out. However, I don't think it will make it any where close to black layer. It all depends on how warm we stay in October and early November.
     
  6. S.King28

    S.King28 New Member

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    I have found that when you plant corn late in the year it matures much faster. I've read up on it and they say the plant instinctually knows the length of day and knows "it needs to produce fast" so to speak. It might compensate on yield but if you planted mid July you should be fine.. I have a refuge located on the other side of the river from my farm and they planted corn august the 5th.. it's already tasseled out with ears.
     
  7. bullpinnie

    bullpinnie Elite Refuge Member

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    that is certainly not my experience. In Missouri , the earliest that corn would be ready is about Nov 5. ....and that is if your have normal rain, and way above average temps. add another week to flood it, and you've still missed the first week of duck season.


    As to the millet, I'd shred 1/2 to 2/3 of it. The seed will sink, and ducks will find it where the blackbirds can't.
    millet.jpg

    I like to have plenty of open water showing.......this is a before pic. we mow at least half. I'll try to get you the after pic.
     
  8. hannibal

    hannibal Senior Refuge Member

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    Wow, we have experienced planting in July a few times before and the results are NOT GOOD in NW Missouri. It either makes very weak corn or no corn at all in some cases. You can help it a little with fertilizer etc. but corn, in our experience, needs to have a good 100 days before it really produces a good crop for the ducks. We mow the majority of our non-corn crop prior to putting water on. We have already done that and have water on the majority of our pool area. We do not flood up to the corn ears this early and will not start to do that until we get closer to big duck season in early November.

    Good luck
     
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  9. S.King28

    S.King28 New Member

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    Yea maybe Tennessee weather makes that big of a difference? I wouldn't think so but I've seen it many times down here. I've planted corn myself about 5 years ago about mid July and could have cropped it by late October.. I planted just a normal pioneer round up ready seed.. the guys I was talking about in my earlier post could have planted a hybrid. You might want to try that for future reference. They make a corn that supposedly matures in 80-90 days even planted in normal dates. If planted late it prolly would make in 70 days.
     
  10. S.King28

    S.King28 New Member

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    you're nitrogen levels might be low?
     

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