'Mobile' or 'Sit n Wait'?

Discussion in 'Turkey Hunters Forum' started by HunterRed, Mar 18, 2016.

  1. HunterRed

    HunterRed New Member

    Messages:
    10
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2016
    Location:
    Missouri
    Im pretty new to turkey hunting, last season was my first. Loved every minute of it, saw some birds but didn't get any shots off. My question for those of you who have done it a while, is your preferred method of hunting gobblers to call and move closer to them and be more mobile or to squat and find your tree and call and let them come all the way to you? I'm sure all kinds of factors play into your decision, just wanting to hear some of your opinions. Good luck to you all this season and shoot straight!
     
  2. marsh-mello

    marsh-mello Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,689
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2003
    Location:
    Ca
    Being where they are is #1...then calling sparingly and having limitless patience has put more birds in the dirt for me and my kids than anything else. Don't be afraid to take a nap, and rest your mind while becoming a stone. If you are just walking around without a plan hoping to get a bird to respond IMHO you are committing a cardinal sin which most inexperienced hunters do. If you have other hunters walking around then accept they probably have already blown it for you and time to get up and find unmolested territory, or accept waiting even longer for things to "return to nature." I have moved on a few but usually after a whole day of nothing coming in and only as a last resort and have a intimate understanding of the lay of the land and the birds locations. Countless birds will come in without a sound and every single person here probably without exception has got up only to spook a bird or two.

    That's the best advice I can give to someone starting out and it's the benefit of years of myself doing it wrong and finally sort of figuring out how to do it right. I would say good luck, but luck is for those without skill...you just upped your skill level if you can understand how to apply those principles! Now go get'em and post up some of this seasons success for us to enjoy vicariously.
     
  3. redjones

    redjones Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    866
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Location:
    Hobart,Indiana
    Normal day for me,if I have a bird roosted (have a game plan).
    Set up where I think I'll have the best chance to kill him when he flies down (try to be where you think he'll want to be).
    That didn't work because he flew down the opposite direction and followed the three hens he was roosted with (don't make a mistake thinking you can sneak up on him,because he's just over the hill,wrong).
    Depending on if there are other tom's in the area and how much property there is helps me decide my next move,small farm and few birds hold tight and call very little,see what unfolds (especially later in the morning).
    Bigger property and birds in different areas I will usually stay put for a little while then go searching for more workable birds (toms that aren't with hens,birds that jakes have beat up etc. )
    Still no luck,now I set up in places that I have seen toms strutting later in the mornings usually after the hens are going back to sit on their nest, calling very little (I have killed a lot of birds during this time 10:00 - 2:00).
    Afternoons can be good too you just have stay in the game and not get discouraged (take a cat nap,get something to eat,think about your next move).
    Try and roost a couple of different birds,give yourself options,don't try to kill the same bird every day you hunt,mix it up (try sleeping in and getting started midmorning,a lot of guys quit hunting to early).
    If your serious about turkeys then like anything else try to learn from your mistakes and capitalize on your strong points,if you suck on a mouth call but are pretty good on a friction call then don't blow birds out trying to use a mouth call.(there will time to practice on using a mouth call,you know the farm like the back of your hand use that to your advantage).
    Decoys,buy the best you can afford,usually a jake and a hen,if you are only buying one I would go with the hen,learn how to use them Safely(dave smith and avian x seem to be top of the line right now).
    Calls,there are a few choices box calls,pot calls,scratch boxes,nail calls etc. are friction calls,mouth calls,trumpet calls,tube calls etc. are air operated and for most harder to learn.(I recommend a good box call to start or maybe a good pot call).
    Guns,I am a firm believer in using any shotgun you want as long as it shoots a decent pattern,most guys have a choice of 2-3 shotguns to hunt with these days.(Buy a few different shells and try them in different guns till you get a winner, pattern,pattern pattern,I like hevi-13-2oz. 7 shot,thats what my gun shoots best).
    Camo,any pattern you have will probably work,the main thing is to hold still,its been said lots ,if turkeys could smell you would probably never kill one.(their eyes and ears are unbelievable).
    Gear,some guys like vests some don't,I am a vest guy always have been for good reasons,to carry stuff,a good seat,baseball style hat,a face mask,gloves,pruners,calls,chalk,strikers,decoys,shells,bug and tick spray,toilet paper,snacks,water,license,bino's etc.(the list is endless depending on your needs).
    Anyway I know I have been long winded but hopefully something in here might help you out,enjoy it all Spring is a great time to be out in the woods.


    Good Luck………..Greg
     
  4. Squaller

    Squaller Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    18,784
    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Location:
    Fresno, California
    Some great advice given...

    Another piece of advice is to get a good box call (or two). There is not an easier call to use that sounds more realistic and still has good versatility. Box calls are loud, but can be used quietly as well, and there are no spring sounds a hen makes that cannot be made on a box call.

    Spring Creek makes a custom call, and I recently had a good experience with him. Call him up, tell him what you want, and ask his advice. $35 puts one at your door.

    Lynch Fool Proof and/or Primos Heartbreaker are probably my top picks for name brand box calls… Opinions will vary.

    Mouth calls are great to have in the arsenal, but they take practice; it is really easy to do more harm than good with a mouth call. A mouth call can be used with no motion (which is the big advantage over friction calls). A good percentage of experienced turkey hunters prefer a mouth call to finish birds (that last 100 yards or so).

    Pot calls are another call that is fairly easy to learn (not as easy as a box). Very versatile call, and using different strikers on a given surface can produce different sounding calls… I keep losing the little sticks (strikers), and have gotten away from pot calls myself.

    Great to hear birds gobble, but often, they come in quietly, and it can take a while. I have flubbed a fair number of birds by giving up to early, only to stand up and see a bird booking out that had approached quietly. (As Marsh-Mello states, patience is truly a virtue for hunting turkeys)

    If I am in an area that had a lot of gobbling activity early in the morning, I am more apt to stay put. Often that submissive bird might try to sneak in (often quietly), or the hens will leave those toms, and they will come back lookin' for love.

    That being said, if I can cover some ground and try to raise a bird, I will do so, if things have been quiet for too long (or there was no gobbling at first light). Later in the morning, I will walk areas that allow me not to be seen, and try to raise a bird. Do not be in a hurry, and always, always when you call, make sure you are against a tree, or somewhere you can hide.

    As a general rule, call sparingly. The more you call, the more the tom expects you to go to him... There are times when aggressive calling can work, but most of the time, I try not to call more than every 5 or 10 minutes (which seems like an eternity), and if I can control myself, every 15-20 minutes. The closer they get, the less I call. And they can hear astoundingly well… You would be surprised at how far away a turkey can hear a quiet cluck or purr.

    In general, if I can see a bird, I do not call at him (as he is likely to spot me). If you need to call at a close bird, do so when he is behind a tree or bush and cannot see you.
     
  5. iawaterfowler

    iawaterfowler Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,637
    Joined:
    May 7, 2012
    Location:
    Iowa
  6. HunterRed

    HunterRed New Member

    Messages:
    10
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2016
    Location:
    Missouri
    Wow, these are the best responses to my question. Very informative and very helpful!! Thank you for all of them. And that video is pretty sweet... Looks like it definitely works
     
  7. Squaller

    Squaller Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    18,784
    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Location:
    Fresno, California
    The video iawaterfowler posted is using a method called "turkey reaping." Plenty of videos on youtube.

    Quite a few discussions in the turkey hunting world about this method as far as ethics and safety. The ethics come in, cause it is extremely productive and takes little skill.

    Having watched some of these videos out of curiosity myself, I am always surprised at how often the shooter misses, or cripples birds (even at close ranges). There are decoys made that actually attach to the gun, and other decoys such as this where you need to drop the decoy to shoot. I suppose the missing is due to a poor sight picture in the former, and a moving/running target away from the shooter in the latter.

    The safety issue is self explanatory, and there is little doubt that someone is going to take a shot at someone else.

    Personally, I would like to see such methods restricted on public ground, and let the land-owners decide the rules for such on their own property. To me, the exciting part about spring turkey hunting is calling the bird in. Shooting a turkey on the ground takes little shooting skill and is somewhat anti-climatic... It is the whole process of getting to the point of taking the shot that is fun.
     
    Yellow Pup and stevena198301 like this.
  8. redjones

    redjones Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    866
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Location:
    Hobart,Indiana
    Why do people always want to take something that is steeped in tradition & heritage and turn it into a circus act.
    Maybe its because I am getting a little older,but I just don't understand.
    Why not just shoot them off the roost and be done with it,that way you can get back to your video games and rap music.


    Greg
     
    Jawbreaker and stevena198301 like this.
  9. widgeon

    widgeon Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    8,833
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Location:
    Ga
    The answer is, it depends, and sometimes you'll be wrong. That;s what makes it fun!

    I used to try to get within 200 yds of a gobbling bird. Now that my knees are giving me trouble, I sit and wait most of the time.

    I bumped a lot of birds by moving, and sometimes they just won't come in if I don't.

    Every way is fun!
     
  10. 10GAGENUT

    10GAGENUT Elite Refuge Member Flyway Manager

    Messages:
    11,313
    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2003
    Location:
    JeffcoMO
    My old joints couldn't crawl that far anymore.:l
    Last year opening day was a prime example of who knows what's right for Turkey. In my favorite spot before the sun came up, public land that I have killed plenty of turkeys on in the past. Just before shooting time another guy comes along, see's me there and says Oh didn't know you were here I'll go hunt in back of you a few hundred yards, 10 minutes later I here boom and here he comes a while later with a nice gobbler. He kicked the bird up walking back to another spot, the way it goes.
     

Share This Page