Mud Motor Recommendation

Discussion in 'Mud Motors' started by bang you'r dead, Jan 19, 2013.

  1. Glades Ranger

    Glades Ranger Elite Refuge Member

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    Good deal, A5Mag12! You've made a good investment. I think PD is among the best of SD's for sure. Looking back at the initial post, that transom is 21" so he best go with a SD (PD, GT, etc.) I don't see many PD's down here; don't think they have a dealer anymore- like I said, our conditions merit an LT vs. a SD. but many have morphed from an LT to a SD for good reasons. Most SD's bought are for single use (duck hunting) and only a few run the salt water, so that is an expensive buy but bang could probably use for both ducking and fishing fresh water up there. I use mine for both ducking and fresh water fishing and some of the rigors of driving an LT are offset by less expense, simpler design reliability....I get there early and it is fast enough for me.
     
  2. duckkillerclyde

    duckkillerclyde Banned

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  3. bang you'r dead

    bang you'r dead Canada Forum Mod. Eh! Moderator Flyway Manager

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    I ended up buying the Beavertail. My son drove it home for me and I gave it a good look over. Other than a little rubbing where the blind goes on and off, the boat looks minty, as in new. Motor is spotless, prop is spotless and blind still smells like new. I priced it out with the exact options and it came out to a little over 16K, plus taxes, so I picked it up for less than 1/2 of that, so I think I did OK. Now if the ice finally goes on the river, I can take it for a spin.

    It looks identical to this one.

    [​IMG]

    My wife says I have to sell one of my boats. I don't know why, I have 4 parked on my front lawn, and two canoes and two kayaks in the back garage. Women....
     
  4. Glades Ranger

    Glades Ranger Elite Refuge Member

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    Nice pic and rig, bang you'r dead! That open floor plan is great and the simplicity of the LT is great. I don't care about speed, just getting there and back and I've gotten used to the rigor of the tiller which is not so bad and you sure hear a lot of people whining about that- there's a fellow well into his seventies that runs a 14' jon with an LT down here and he's my role model.:tu
     
  5. Glades Ranger

    Glades Ranger Elite Refuge Member

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    As I posted elsewhere, longtail users do not have attention deficit disorder, we're just SLOW.:no
     
  6. bang you'r dead

    bang you'r dead Canada Forum Mod. Eh! Moderator Flyway Manager

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    I took it out on the lake behind my house yesterday. About an 18" chop on the water and thick heavy matted old cattails and marsh muck. It went through it like a champ. A couple things I found out about mud motors.

    1. You can't drive them sitting down.

    2. Balance the boat. If off center, you have to bear down on the handle all the time.

    3. It is easier to drive when leaning against the handle and keeping both hands on the handle at the same time.


    The thing runs over 15 mph in the crud, so I am very happy. Two 10 foot lock boxes on each side to keep your stuff dry, and good anchor points. The boat is heavy , but I am sure it adds to stability. Well designed. Very stable in all conditions.

    I didn't know how much muscle it takes to steer this thing along. It will take a little practice to get used to it. The whole point is I cruised the entire marsh, muck , and open water with zero problems, and only in the heaviest stuff did I slow down at all. Just lifting the motor out of the water cleared any garbage off the prop and away I went. I am impressed. Why didn't I buy one of these years ago.
     
  7. Glades Ranger

    Glades Ranger Elite Refuge Member

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    Enjoy! I made my first purchase back in '89 and never looked back...very minor repairs since then- well worth it for this application. The conventional outboard was a nightmare and expensive. The speed loss is more than made up for being able to go most places in a straight line- and this means to where the ducks are! If you were looking for a way to exercise your left arm this is it! I paid around $8K for the boat (Grizzly 1648), motor (27 HP MB LT), and trailer, all back in 2004. It would be a bit more today, granted, but with proper maintenance, the motor should last another 6-7 years...a good friend has a 15 year old Kohler 25 GD LT that runs like a top. I agree, in the marsh I am usually standing up when running, much better visibility and for turning- when I run the canals or open water on a big lake I sit down mostly.
     
  8. HaydenHunter

    HaydenHunter Elite Refuge Member

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    bang,

    Congratulations on your boat and motor purchase. It appears that you got a smoking deal relative to the condition of the boat and what you got.

    You might now formulate a plan to sell the longtail and get into a shorttail mud motor, a.k.a., Mudbuddy Hyperdrive, Prodrive, Gatortail, GoDevil Surface Drive, Copperhead.

    Shorttails go faster...considerably faster. When you fill that boat with the weight of your hunting load you are gonna notice it really slows down. Shorttails can be driven like an outboard, standing or sitting, with one hand.

    Like you, I am operating my duck boat in very cold conditions and falling out of the boat is a bad deal. My preference is to drive standing with one hand on the tiller and one hand on my stand-up grab bar. You never know when the motor is gonna hit something and transfer the movement up the tiller, which on a longtail you are holding on to and wrestling with two hands. Yet in the light of day when you wanna sit and drive you can do it on a shorttail. Finally, the shorttails do not require you to pull up on the tiller handle to keep the prop in the water.

    Look, longtails are better at a couple of things than shorttails. But I have run shorttails for the last 9 years over a variety of conditions and I have never been dissatisfied or stuck. And shorttails are better than longtails for all the reasons I have mentioned above.

    My prediction is that with major new models coming from Mudbuddy and Prodrive there is going to be a lot of good quality shorttails on the used market very soon.

    Just my .02
     
  9. Glades Ranger

    Glades Ranger Elite Refuge Member

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    Hayden, probably 8/10 marshes a shortail would shine. My area is usually shallow, the bottom has very little mud and underneath that is hard coral rock or sand/marl, both of which can shear props or reduce them quickly. I've gotten stuck worse in a shortail (35 HP MB Hyper) because you can get into less water quicker and then when you stop you are big time stuck and reverse or winches are useless. In my longtail rig, I will bottom out faster and thus extrication becomes a lot easier and less prop wear. Apart from any HP restrictions, the extra weight of the big block shortail becomes a liability. For all the cogent reasons: long runs in big water, carrying load, more speed, easier turning radius, easier trailering, reverse option in several models, stand/sit drivability, available mods for more speed (albeit costly), better fit for both duck hunting and fishing, the shortail shines. I took a run in the marsh last weekend and the conditions were as described so that to run a shortail I would have had to trim up the drive to the point where I could not run as fast, to avoid excessive prop wear. My costs for maintenance and repair over the years are way less than several shortail owners' I know and their record in the same period. The shortail has taken over what was once a longtail market and for all very good reasons but thankfully mfg.'s like GD, MB, and BackH2O still make them for an important niche market.
     
  10. HaydenHunter

    HaydenHunter Elite Refuge Member

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    Glades, you are right about your application. For shallow hard bottoms the longtail shines. I have owned balanced Hyperdrives, where it is easy to lift the prop, like a longtail, and Sport Hyperdrives and my current Prodrive, which are quite weighted back. Sometimes (thankfully not that often for me) when I run extended periods over shallow rocky river channels, I wish I had a light longtail. Similar to you running over coral.

    I have found, however, that if you don't encounter hard shallows, the shorttail is pretty sweet. We can have 4 to 10 mile one way runs to get in and out of our hunt spots. Too tedious for me going slow and wrestling with a longtail. Heck, half the time I wish I still had an outboard for long run speed, but I would never really go back to one.

    The other application I think the longtail shines in is stump fields and when you get hung up on obstacles like beaver dams and humps. Being able to get the prop in water when the back of the boat is high and dry and possibly use the motor to push off is increased with the longer drive.
     

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