My self experimant with the new Hevi-X and Federal Black Cloud

Discussion in 'Shooting - Reloading Forum' started by BAYDOG, Feb 25, 2018.

  1. BAYDOG

    BAYDOG Moderator- Diver, NY Forum, Refuge Classifieds Sponsor Moderator Flyway Manager

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    No huge chronographs, no paper at 40yard stuff, just a shell to shell, hunt to hunt comparison. My shots are never no further then 40 yards, most are 25-35 yards. Birds varied from mallards to Eider. Bought six boxes of #2 3" Hevi X and six boxes #2 3" BC, newer BC.
    I was not that impressed with the Hevi X, I flat out killed more ducks and crippled less ducks across the species with the BC. I had higher hopes of the Hevi X doing better. But even on the tougher Eider and Scoter, we had zero cripples with the BC, chased four cripples with the HX. I don't know why, my guess is the irregular shaped HX, there isn't one pellet round, some shaped like rice, some blobs with two or three nipples.
     
  2. Drakehammer

    Drakehammer Senior Refuge Member

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    Just a few considerations.
    Advertized muzzle velocity is the same @ 1450 fps (I think). Pure steel is considerably less dense so the Black Cloud will bleed fps faster. Are you used to shooting steel and do you shoot it well? Maybe there’s a slight difference in your on target pellet count due strictly to velocity?
    The irregular shapes of Hevi-Shot type tunsten offerings are not necessarily bad. In fact, most of the hevi shot shapes are more aerodynamic than plain spheres (Think about the airfoil airplane wing and think about a knuckle ball). The heavier weight and irregular shapes should work in favor of the Hevi X for tighter patterns.
    On another note, the ring around the Black Cloud Flightstopper pellets makes it less aerodynamic and may have actually worked in your favor for getting slightly bigger, more effective pattern. Won’t know for sure unless you put those loads on a pattern board. Just my thinking.
     
  3. jbrown

    jbrown Elite Refuge Member

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    Evidently, the HX is not what I was hoping it would be. I've got a buddy that loved HX on wide decoying mallards this past season in Ark.
     
  4. Ravenanme

    Ravenanme Elite Refuge Member

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    With a Hunter staying within himself ( shooting at birds inside the decoys ) Plain old steel shot does a fine job "if" you hit the bird with more the 20 %
    of the pattern ! The difficult tough birds like Eiders require larger shot sizes with more energy ( I've been told ) so why not use a higher density shot type
    in a smaller pellet size to improve your success ? I guess it all depends on , how good of shot you are ?
     
  5. jzoo

    jzoo Senior Refuge Member

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    :scratch
     
  6. Drakehammer

    Drakehammer Senior Refuge Member

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    64B79DB2-68F1-40F0-9E31-E928D93A1554.jpeg
    Visual explanation may be best. Streamlined may be a better description than aerodynamic. Those hevi pellets that have a little bump or smaller shot welded to a larger one actually have less drag than perfect spheres. Helps with retained velocity and straighter flight path.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2018
  7. Ravenanme

    Ravenanme Elite Refuge Member

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    I've always gone by the theory of shot performance as , you gotta hit'em first to understand their higher density benefits !
     
  8. jzoo

    jzoo Senior Refuge Member

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    That makes sense if the pieces of shot flew through the air in that position. But won't these pieces of welding slag spin through the air causing them to lose velocity faster (or maybe just at the rate of plain round steel) and fly crooked? Have you ever hit an old golf ball on the range that had a small piece of the cover torn and flapped? It don't go very far or straight.
    Even on the pic of your 5% shape, that projectile would tumble if shot through a smooth bore.
     
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  9. BAYDOG

    BAYDOG Moderator- Diver, NY Forum, Refuge Classifieds Sponsor Moderator Flyway Manager

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    I shoot better then most, not as good as some. I shoot sporting clays 5-6 times a year, average High 30's-low 40's. Skeet maybe 10 times a year(shot in a league as a kid), and average 23. And shoot trap at least once a week in the summer.
     
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  10. Drakehammer

    Drakehammer Senior Refuge Member

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    EBBB8355-545C-4BFB-AE40-DC7CF94C10E4.jpeg Jzoo...Good questions and your golfball example is valid. Indeed a golfball has a great deal of spin imparted to it purposely...thats how we control its flight path. If a golfball didn’t spin, its flight path would be rather unpredictable, like a knuckleball pitch in baseball. The dimples on the golfball reduce drag which helps with retained velocity. In your example, the old raggedy golfball flap interferes with the imparted spin which kills its flight path and slows it down due to air resistance. In fact, if the raggedy golfball could be hit with enough energy to make it travel a long, long, long distance, the spin of the raggedy golfball would be overcome in flight to assume the most streamlined orientation with the flap toward the rear, and its flight path would be straighter with more retained velocity.

    Shotgun pellets are protected and secured in position by the wad. There is generally no spin imparted to the pellets. When they separate from the wad, they tend to assume the most streamlined orientation (like a teardrop or airfoil), which gives the straightest flight path and least drag for better retained velocity. There is even evidence that pellets will draft each other. Sure, I believe some pellets will tumble but these are preferentially the round pellets, not the “teardrop” shaped ones. The smoothest roundest pellets experience higher drag than the “misshapen” ones, much like a smooth golfball would have much higher drag than the dimpled golfball.

    Now to compare low density, round steel pellets to the odd shaped, high density Hevi-shot, is like comparing a ping-pong ball to a golfball.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2018

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