Need advice on builidng a floodable field

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by schmidty3, Aug 23, 2017.

  1. schmidty3

    schmidty3 New Member

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    Nov 9, 2015
    I'm not really sure how it would all react to a big rain. The main feeder creek to the lake is right next to this area. So I'm not sure if the lake would fill up before my plot, and equalize over the back of the levee or what. Or i may make a spilway aimed to the east toward the creek.

    The finger of trees is definitely the lowest part of the area. I think plugging the drainage would end up with a 6 ft deep low spot. But the average depth across the whole area would be more like 2 ft.

    My biggest fear is the soils ability to hold water. But if it's a good indication the spot on the 2nd pic that reads "okfuskee" usually is pretty damp. Also the terraces further west up the hill hold water for a good period of time. I've watched mallards fly by my dekes on the lake and land in those potholes!

    As far as draining goes. I'm not terrible worried about it. The average height of the lake would be below the drain pipe. Pulling the boards out should drain it right out.

    Also... I'm hoping this is a pretty easy project actually. My Grandma has dozer work done at least once a year anyway. I'm pretty sure the dozer guy could fill in gap in question in a few hours.

    So I could have then do that with a pipe. Put the flash board riser on. Then see what happens. Might be less then $1000 to try it.
     
  2. STL11

    STL11 New Member

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    Aug 14, 2017
    Location:
    NE NC

    My opinion i would go for it especially if its low cost to you what could it hurt. I built 2 small impoundments in eastern nc last yr 1 of which is on land behind my house and had ducks using it just a few days after flooding and i'm not on a major flyway here. Have some ag fields around the area that get minor flooding and some canals they use but thats it. Hoping this yr is even better they say it takes time to get them "right" i used to have a small swamp spot no bigger than an acre or 2 that held anywhere from 2-4k ducks during peak migration so size is definitely not too much of an issue from my experience. Good luck and keep us posted on how it goes
     
  3. bullpinnie

    bullpinnie Elite Refuge Member

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    the first thing you need to do is have your soil tested to make sure it will hold water (semi-permanently).
     
  4. nick b

    nick b Senior Refuge Member

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    KS
    How tall are the trees? I've had some excellent hunts in moist soil units where a handful of trees are left intact and flooded and can be hunted from under them.
     
  5. schmidty3

    schmidty3 New Member

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    Nov 9, 2015
    The trees in the center of the floodable area are mostly fairly young 20-30 ft tall willows. The problem is that they are right in the deepest part. So when its flooded they may be 4 ft deep. So that won't be fun. I've thought about pushing dirt up the base but I don't think the cover is quite good enough. I figured I'd try to at least get one good year in (crops+standing water And figure out how the ducks want to use the area), then Maybe build a more permanent blind.

    The trees on the east side are all mature trees. Easy to hunt out of most likely.

    Thanks for the responses.

    What's the best way to check the soil?
    I looked into thus a while back and I think I read somewhere that you cut a hole in a t gal bucket dig it into the ground and fill it with water. But my memory is rusty
     
  6. bullpinnie

    bullpinnie Elite Refuge Member

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    St. Louis
    Call or state Department of Natural resources ( conservation department), or local university, or NRCS.

    A word of caution, if you call state or NRCS, they could possibly make you have to pull permits for what you are doing.
     

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