NWFL Duck Impoundment - Need Opinions /Help!!!

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by BULL SPRIG 88, Dec 23, 2016.

  1. KAHunter

    KAHunter Senior Refuge Member

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    Wood ducks will definetly hit a corn impoundment. Thats our number 1 duck. We have a similar size that you are looking at and I really enjoy hunting there. Its not the end all be all of impoundments but it gives us a decent to pretty good shoot atleast once a week throughout the season. If you can afford it it is totally worth it. With good management a small impoundment can be great.
     
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  2. bullpinnie

    bullpinnie Elite Refuge Member

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    The issue I can see with flooding corn specifically for wood ducks is that you'll nee to flood it to about 3 or 4 feet. Woodies will definitely come to flooded corn, but they prefer shallow water.....not to mention, it would be cheaper to flood 1 foot instead of 3+.

    you'd probably be better off with a moist soil unit, rather than just corn. you could plant a millet, milo, of buckwheat to keep it short.
     
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  3. KAHunter

    KAHunter Senior Refuge Member

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    You dont need to flood it to the ears. You are better off keeping it shallow. They will get to the corn
     
  4. xpress1650

    xpress1650 New Member

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    I believe there is a dwarf corn but I do not remember the name. You could pull levees and plant rice but would be labor intensive and water resource would have to be great. I have seen ducks climb corn stalks about a 12 inches to get to the corn. You can do it, you just have to do some more research. Try it this year and if it don't work disk it and make up another plan for next season.
     
  5. KAHunter

    KAHunter Senior Refuge Member

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    I would skip the dwarf corn. The yields are terrible. Go with whatever variety of field or dent corn the farmers use in you area. Plant when they plant and fertilize/spray just like they do. Flood and the ducks will get to it, even if the ears arent at the water. Wood ducks are our #1 duck and our ears are anywhere from chest to head high on average. Corn is close to 10' tall this year. They get to it.
     
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  6. BULL SPRIG 88

    BULL SPRIG 88 New Member

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    The Woods
    OK so now I am thinking I am going to go at it on my own. My father-in-law (who co-owns the farm with me) has a 34 hp Kubota tractor with front end loader and box blade. Here's my question... unfortunately the field has about 7' of fall from one side to the other. It sure doesn't look that significant when you're out there, but that is what Google Earth says. I would obviously shoot grades moving forward. Is it completely crazy to try and tackle a 3.5 acre impoundment with that equipment? I know a dozer and other heavy equipment would certainly make quicker work of it but I'd like to keep the costs down and I'm in no huge rush. The other option is to have a dozer come push the "main" dirt / rough grade, we then work a little while with the tractor, and then have the dozer come back and finish grade the bottoms and the berms. Would you attempt it with the tractor... or should I just hire someone with a dozer?
     
  7. STL11

    STL11 New Member

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    If you can run one i would say rent a dozer yourself. I did one myself about 3 acres and rented a dozer for a day for little under a grand and it worked great
     
  8. GLS

    GLS New Member

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    7' of vertical difference is quite a bit of dirt to move to make things relatively level. Maybe split the field into 2 or 3 smaller pools where you can step them? That way you can pump highest elevation pool and gravity drain into lower units. Hard to say without good elevation data and knowing the layout.
     
  9. xpress1650

    xpress1650 New Member

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    good advice. Could you do it with that particular tractor and box blade, yes. Would it take hundreds of man hours and abuse to your 34 tractor, yes. I personally would rent a dozer and cut it myself, then grade it with your tractor. I would think this would be your cheapest route without hiring it out. Im sure you could rent a dozer with lazer guided gps to save with the cut time. Make sure you cut your top soil and push to a pile, then spread onto levee for seeding, plus use some around your plot that you wish to plant corn on. Good Luck
     
  10. JFG

    JFG Elite Refuge Member

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    I'm with you guys on the dozer. Seven feet of elevation difference is a heck of a lot to try and grade out with a tractor and box blade. Terracing it however is an option that could work. But if you do the whole thing, you need to push the top soil to a pile(s) as mentioned, then grade out what hopefully is decent dirt, then reapply the top soil so that you can get something worthwhile to grow. My contractor did not do this, instead pushed everything into slash piles and left me with dirt that would barely grow weeds. Took several years to finally get that good soil back in place before we could grow something good.

    I would think NRCS should be able to help you with all the technical stuff, including taking random core samples to see what levels/types of soil you are dealing with.
     

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