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Paint - Varnish - Tools - Flocking etc...

Discussion in 'Decoy Forum' started by sdkidaho, Dec 28, 2018.

  1. Mean Gene

    Mean Gene Moderator Moderator Flyway Manager

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    Does that stuff truly dry dead flat? I have wondered about that, but have not tried it. Also, do you spray your on, or use a brush?


    Tube oils? What I am using is simply oil based paint out of cans.
     
  2. slough hunter

    slough hunter New Member

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    Gene I use modern masters dead flat varnish. In a nutshell no it does not dry perfectly dead flat. It leaves a slight sheen. I brush it on so I'm sure I'm putting it on a bit thick. I have thought about using an airbrush to get a thinner coat to see if that will take away the sheen. The year I painted in oils I used tube oils and I told myself I would never do that again. My painting techniques are better suited for acrylics since I like to paint in layers and I use more scrubbing techniques than wet on wet blending.
     
  3. Winchester 1897

    Winchester 1897 Elite Refuge Member

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    It's an entirely different process for sure.
     
  4. Mean Gene

    Mean Gene Moderator Moderator Flyway Manager

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    Gotcha, thanks. I have never used tube oils, so I can't even make up a good lie about using those. I do use some blending/shading with my oil based paint, I just have to use a bit of thinner like I'm guessing you are using water. I do like using water to clean up better than thinner though.
     
  5. WHUP ! Hen

    WHUP ! Hen Elite Refuge Member

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    For those of you that use a rasp when carving, I use a cabinet makers rasp. They are relatively expensive, years ago I think I paid $50 each for the 2 rasps. They are numbered 49 and 50. An old carver gave me one that he said was worn out but that rasp was the best I had ever used. You wonder where those rasps been all my life.
     
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  6. SWAMPLVR

    SWAMPLVR Elite Refuge Member

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    Those would be Nicholson rasps that were USA made. I believe the quality has faltered when they started making them in South America.

    Luckily I have a #49 US made.

    Currently my favorite is a rasp made in France. At least double cost, but cuts very clean. Makes sanding easy
     
  7. Neighbor Guy

    Neighbor Guy New Member

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    I think I find our differences to be much more interesting than our similarities. It’s nice to see how we have all found our route to the end location on slightly different paths. I tell the kids in my carving class it’s not that anyone here is doing it the wrong way. It’s that they get to the destination.

    For me, I carve a few every year in high density tan cork, it’s also what my daughter carves most of her birds out of. The rest on done in cedar. I prefer white, but will carve red as long as the grain is tight and fairly straight. Heads are mostly all done out of cedar.

    I get all my lumber as true 2x8 or, 9/4 rough cut, as it takes less time to dry in the garage than full timbers. Then laminate boards together to build my blocks to the right thickness. Once my blocks are laminated I rough out the bodies with a hatchet, draw knife, then work through the progression from Farriers rasp to cabinet rasp to file. Then finish by adding the chip carving g back to make it look like the entire bird was chipped out from the start. I don’t sand anything anymore.

    I use 2-coats of kilz as a primer and do all my painting with acrylic paint. One cheat I have found works for me is latex house paint. I have several shades that I tend to use all the time. Almost on every bird, an off white, a black, two browns, two greys, and a tan. All other details are done with artist acrylics.

    If I want an antique look I use an antique wash of thinner, linseed oil, and tube oils. Similar to what Pat Gregory describes on the u-tube.

    For a final finish I use Grumbacher Matte Final varnish. Couple coats from a few feet away. Gives a good seal without much sheen. There seems to be a push and drive to make your carvings finish “dead flat”. Not sure why that is? Every duck I have ever held in my hands has a slight sheen to them. Healthy hair has a sheen to it. In my eyes a decoy with just a slight matte finish sheen is not a bad thing.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2019
  8. Mean Gene

    Mean Gene Moderator Moderator Flyway Manager

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    I use 2 Foredoms, A Dremel, an angle grinder, hand rasps, a knife and forstner bits, lots of sand paper, a wood burner with pens and a drill. I also have various picks and small screwdrivers. For the big rasp I got a farrier's rasp at Tractor Supply. The small flat and round rasps I got at Harbor Freight. Works great.

    I think there's as many ways to make a bird as there are people making them. :l
     
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  9. creedsduckman

    creedsduckman Elite Refuge Member

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    Where are you guys buying your eyes from? I use to buy them from The Hummel Co but it doesn't look like they carry the ones I use to buy anymore. Nothing fancy just plain painted glass eyes. Just working decoys so that's all I need.
     
  10. WHUP ! Hen

    WHUP ! Hen Elite Refuge Member

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    Tom, the only difference between the 49 and 50 is that the 50 is less aggressive. I couldn’t get along without either one.
     

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