Painting Used Silhouettes

Discussion in 'Goose Hunting Forum' started by BTK, Nov 5, 2017.

  1. BTK

    BTK New Member

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    Has anyone here ever painted over older silhouettes?

    I just bought 120 used silhouettes for $120. 3 dozen of them are Realgeese and look pretty decent (besides a few scratches). The rest are outlaws and appear to be dulled and faded a bit by the sun. I was thinking of just touching up the blacks and whites with some flat rustoleum paint. Thoughts? Should I mess with the brown body too or just leave it? If I do paint it I will lose much of the detail and am a bit afraid I will make it look ugly! I just want to make sure that I eliminate any shine. I don't think that it appears glossy, but thought that a flat paint job would help that out a bit.

    I also bought some flocking and was halfway considering flocking the head/neck. Is that overkill?

    Thanks for your input!
     
  2. mpkowal

    mpkowal Senior Refuge Member

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    NvNativeDucker flocks the black and maybe white on his and they look great,do a search or Pm Bill
     
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  3. negooseman

    negooseman Senior Refuge Member

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    Make sure the outlaws are worth doing. After mine aged a few years, they literally cracked/****tered in the cold.
     
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  4. gary s.

    gary s. Elite Refuge Member

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    FLOCKING IS THE RIGHT ANSWER. B.O.L.
     
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  5. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator Flyway Manager

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    Yes. Flock the black, head/neck AND the tails. Follow the black all the way into the body. Makes em pop.

    You got some advice on the Outlaws, which is solid. I started with Outlaws, and I killed geese over them. However, they DO crack very easily. I still have some Snow outlaws, only because I never hunt snows, but if I do, I have 'something' to throw out there. A fair number of them have cracked tails, beaks, etc. Really, this is all fluff, since you have them, and know what kind of condition they are in. I would not throw the broken ones away, unless you can't get a stake into them. Advice on ugly decoys follows below.

    Now, the problem with the Outlaws is, that plastic does not hold paint very well. The normal scrubbing with a green pad is not enough to rough them up to hold. You need to get a sanding sponge, 80-100 grit, or just take a sander to them. Since you are flocking over it anyway, you don't have to worry about ruining the finish. Just leave the body and white areas alone. If the white is too faded, you can paint that (scuff up first) but don't bother flocking them in white. This isn't going to be fun, but the old saying, 'Do it right, and only do it once' comes into play.

    This is the only situation I don't recommend 2 coats of flocking. It will just make it peel quicker. RG, especially Pro's, hold the glue (paint) much better. Outlaws, not so much. Just a different kind of plastic. Do your one coat and call it a day.

    Faded is not all that bad. Sure, we like pretty distinct colors, cuz they are nicer to look at. With 10 doz silos, you can put out a pretty good sized set. Go through them, and sort out the worst looking ones. Bag them separate, and set them on the edges. Put your best looking ones in your 'kill hole', or where you want them to set. If conditions allow, you could also put your nasty ones behind you. (depending on the wind).

    You are going to hear that Outlaws shine too much. While I agree they do shine more than other types, shine is over-rated. Think in terms of a signaling mirror. You have to line that mirror up exactly with the sun and your target to get a reflection. If the dekes are straight up and down, and the sun is up, and the geese are up, shine doesn't happen. Now, sunrise, and birds coming out of the sun, sure, could be a problem. Set up accordingly. But, don't overly worry about it. Always look at your set from the viewpoint of the geese, not your blind. It pays to walk out 50 yards, even in the dark, and look back at the set (with a good light). You might be surprised how the 'look' changes. You can create 'lanes' for the birds to come into that might not appear from the viewpoint of the blind, but will from where you expect the birds to set up for landing.
    Last advice: Silos need to be set fairly far apart. At LEAST 3 steps in between any two decoys. I learned this from the creator of Real Geese, Darryl Wise. He taught me about the 'goose perspective', and spacing. We only put out about 4 doz, in a sod field, and it looked HUGE from the blind. We were in a fence line, and the set spread out probably 120 degrees left to right, almost all of them within 40 yards. You can 'black hole' full bodies, or shells, but keep the silos spread out.

    There, that is my 50+ years of experience, in one post. :l
     
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  6. ArmChair Biologist

    ArmChair Biologist Senior Refuge Member

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    If you don't want to work that hard you could just paint them black and white. You'll shoot more geese over them that way. Just make sure you don't put your black and white's too far behind your blinds. Geese like to land in them.

    Obviously keep the real geese natural color. Just paint the faded ones.
     
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  7. BTK

    BTK New Member

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    Awesome detailed response! I really appreciate you taking the time to give me this much detail!
     
  8. BTK

    BTK New Member

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    Thanks for all the responses, guys! This is awesome info. I am new to the silhouette world but am eager to learn. Thanks again!
     
  9. goosenazi

    goosenazi Elite Refuge Member

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    @ArmChair Biologist answered the best. Paint them as b&w’s. Flocking is a waste of time. The key with silos is not realism, it’s baffling them with bs.
     
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  10. ArmChair Biologist

    ArmChair Biologist Senior Refuge Member

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    Don't confuse people. Realism is number one. :no
     
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