Canadian Hunters Forum Sponsors

Peas,,, Peas,,, And More Peas!!!

Discussion in 'Canadian Hunters Forum' started by 870, Jul 16, 2016.

  1. KID CREOLE

    KID CREOLE Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,299
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2002
    Location:
    San Pedro, Ca.
    Peas are easy to hide in, it just takes some work

    We grab a seed bag fill it up with the dry stubble, the stubble is grabbed far away from the blinds so as not to leave a bunch of fresh damp dirt patches near the blinds

    We bring the blinds in closer fill in all gaps a feather out the edges to remove corners and shadows.
     
  2. GUNNERX2

    GUNNERX2 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,766
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2007
    Location:
    TENNESSEE
    When you speak of peas, what type are they? Green peas, chick peas, crowder peas?
     
  3. 870

    870 Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    435
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2000
    Location:
    Waterfowl Heaven Alberta Canada
    Field peas, can be either yellow or green, harvested as dry hard seeds. Similar to chick peas and can used as a chick pea substitute. Peas are often split as well and then sold as as such for split pea soup or lentil substitute. Poorer quality peas often end up in hog rations.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2016
  4. GUNNERX2

    GUNNERX2 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,766
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2007
    Location:
    TENNESSEE
    Thanks for clarification.
     
  5. theduckguru

    theduckguru Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,281
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2003
    Location:
    ohio
    I have a pea ghille blind.
     
  6. Slick

    Slick Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    637
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2013
    Location:
    Rocklin, CA
    I second the willow blind. Have frequently used it especially before the onset of laydown blinds. Whole lot easier to shoot out of. Remember one memorable hunt in SK where 4 of us hunted out of a willow blind. In no time we killed 32 geese, stacked them behind the blind and as we were picking up the dekes the geese kept coming in....amazing!

    The following year we made individual above ground willow blinds....short ones like '4 tall and '3 diameter out of tubular steel and mesh wire w' a circular sliding roof......pretty Slick! Brushed the blinds w/ willows and ground straw and set the 4 blinds like '40-50 apart. We killed geese that were landing '6 in front of the blinds...remember having one goose walk right up to my blind as if peering inside.
     
  7. 870

    870 Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    435
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2000
    Location:
    Waterfowl Heaven Alberta Canada
    More and more guys are trying the old fashioned willow blinds again up here. Seem to be working decent enough on ducks, early season geese and flocks with lots of juvies. You do seem to need to be out of the decoys and get a bit more creative with your set in the later season if you want to shoot decoying birds as opposed to passing birds.

    At any rate, having hunted out of willow blinds for 30 years prior to making the switch to layouts around the year 2000. I will say the stand up willow blinds are nicer to shoot out of, but I do prefer the ease of just throwing out a ghillied up layout blind and gathering up bit of straw vs setting up a willow blind and hauling a bunch of willows around.
     
  8. GUNNERX2

    GUNNERX2 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,766
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2007
    Location:
    TENNESSEE
    I don't know if this was a local thing, but when hunting SK years ago with a local, we went out into the field at night with his '54 Chevy pickup with a hydraulic auger mounted in the back. We drilled holes about 3 1/2' - 4' deep, spread the dirt around the holes and covered the dirt with stubble gathered elsewhere. Come time to hunt we dropped down in the holes, sat on buckets and covered up with huge shells that had holes cut out in the side and covered with black hardware cloth for viewing. The birds never knew we were there until we flipped off the shells and came up shooting. The down side of all that was filling the holes back up with shovels. This was in wheat not peas.
     

Share This Page