Pit Blind made out of wood question

Discussion in 'Boats, Blinds, & Gadgets Forum' started by bbfky, Apr 17, 2018.

  1. 2WIDGN

    2WIDGN Senior Refuge Member

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    @bbfky thank you. We use stalk bundles. 5 corn stalks zip tied in three places in each bundle. 8 bundles per shooting hole. I've hunted a couple pits in grass with bundles also. Each shooting hole has a sliding plywood lid to keep out blowing snow and to hold heat in when we have heaters running.
     
  2. bbfky

    bbfky Elite Refuge Member

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    Thanks guys, Yes the wrap is used to protect and prolong the wood from rotting over the years, not trying to waterproof it just prolonging it. Got some Ice guard roof wrap yesterday was planning on wrapping it with that. The pit will be at the edge of a soybean/corn field next to our pond assuming we can get it buried deep enough without hitting rock really shallow, will know in the next couple of days. Don't have a plan B LOL maybe make it shorter if we hit rock. Here is hoping and praying we can get it in the ground far enough it doesn't look like a grave site.

    2WIDGN,
    so do the pieces of plywood go up when you aren't hunting and the bundles stay on while you are hunting ? If so do you just store then in the pit during a hunt. There are so many types of doors/openings that sounds like you wouldn't flare the birds when you come out as bad as say flip lids.

    We mainly hunt geese but shoot ducks if they come in. Had good success hunting the ducks in the fields over mojos this past years from layouts.
     
  3. Waterdog Trainer

    Waterdog Trainer Senior Refuge Member

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    Here is a previous thread on the lids we use. I have been using this design for over 25 years. We've never have any issues with flaring. Most time birds don't even see them open. I use them in corn, beans and pasture grass. With corn you just staple the husks to the lids. With beans you place stubble on the lids and staple bird netting over it to hold it on. Pasture grass is a little more difficult. I use killer weed or raffia grass on the lids which works well. I usually use a mixture or all terrain color. Pasture grass is green at the beginning of the season and is brown by the end so this usually covers the range. The advantages of this style of lid are almost total concealment, 360* visibility with minimal movement, keeps weather out, easy simple design that is trouble free.

    http://www.refugeforums.com/posts/10511288/
     
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  4. bbfky

    bbfky Elite Refuge Member

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    Waterdog,
    that looks Awesome! are the lids made of steel or plywood, when they are closed are you getting 360 visibility by looking out of the small cutout lid or looking underneath, the pic of the corn field was amazing complete concealment
     
  5. Waterdog Trainer

    Waterdog Trainer Senior Refuge Member

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    Yes, they are plywood. I've found 5/8" seems to work best. Looking out of the cutout. It is large enough to call and turn around. There is nothing set in stone on the size of lid or cutout. I use the 24"x32" so you get six lids with no waste and are large enough for a big guy. The cutout is something like 16"wide x 10" deep. I take the lids off after season and store them flat which makes them last many years.
     
  6. 2WIDGN

    2WIDGN Senior Refuge Member

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    The plywood lids are on a sliding track system. They slide under the roof when not in use. I'll see if I can find a picture.
     
  7. 2WIDGN

    2WIDGN Senior Refuge Member

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    This was this spring when I was getting things opened up for summer. Plywood lids are slid back underneath the roof. You can kind of see the track system. Sorry I don't have a better picture. KIMG0144.JPG
     
  8. Tailfeathers

    Tailfeathers Elite Refuge Member

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    I've hunted wood pits and cement pits. The wood ones eventually got weak over the years with rot and the sides started to bulge inward. The cement ones are there forever. If I were building one, I'd forget the wood idea and get / rent forms or make forms, get a cement mixer and tank water into the field a case or so of beer and fire up that mixermatic up and get your friends in on it. Gas mixer rented for the day, a wheel barrel, some rebar and some muscle. Most farms have a water tank you could probably borrow. If not, you can pick up truck/5 gallon pail it (with covers) from the farm's water source.
    On the inside of the cement blind, I would add plywood to the front and half side walls so guys guns are protected when leaning them or moving them around , to prevent them from scuffing those abrasive walls with their beloved shotguns. I'd also design in a sump in the floor for a pump. Easy to do.
    One misconception is that a wood blind is warmer than a cement blind. Not so. 20 degree wood is just as cold as 20 degree cement, and the wood is not going to warm up from body heat, or even a heater when the roof has big holes in it to look or shoot from.
     
  9. likesbigspreads

    likesbigspreads Elite Refuge Member

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    Funny how the dogs always go to their hole, even when not hunting. Bailey was in her hole the whole time we picked up our white spread. I think she was wondering what in the heck we were doing not hunting for once.
     
  10. 2WIDGN

    2WIDGN Senior Refuge Member

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    Yep, she knows her place...and she likes to pose for the camera.
     

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