Plant Id help!

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by notnarbt, Aug 29, 2011.

  1. smashdn

    smashdn Elite Refuge Member

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    My opinion, only an opinion, but I would smoke all that stuff and go back with some stuff that I knew ducks would eat.

    If you look around now you can find smartweed growing in the ditches. Snip it off and dry it out on a cookie sheet at the house. Same thing with barnyard grass and all the other free duck foods. Get a decent amount of seed stock-piled and throw it out next summer on the wet mud as the water falls out of your spot.

    No real need in buying stuff when the good natural stuff is most often free for the taking.
     
  2. Super Swamper

    Super Swamper Moderator Moderator

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    They'll eat the nuts off of the roots prior to the really cold weather. It's OK - high in carbs like a potato. Not great though. I wouldn't waste too much time or money encouraging it or getting rid of it.

    The other thing with the whitish pink flowers...????...I can't imagine it has nutritional value for birds. Maybe somebody can prove me wrong.
     
  3. notnarbt

    notnarbt Senior Refuge Member

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    It actually has these small green "beans" a little smaller then a pea growing on the ends in pods. You can see some of them in the pic.
     
  4. Rob Robertson

    Rob Robertson Elite Refuge Member

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    Never seen that plant before.
     
  5. Super Swamper

    Super Swamper Moderator Moderator

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    Grows in the woods in the eastern US. Deer resistant (poisonous). Native americans used it to treat cuts. Close relative of "lily of the valley" that your grandmother likely had in her flower garden.
     
  6. Clayton

    Clayton Moderator Moderator

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    "They'll eat the nuts off of the roots prior to the really cold weather. It's OK - high in carbs like a potato. Not great though. I wouldn't waste too much time or money encouraging it or getting rid of it."

    Are you talking about yellow-nut sedge???? If so, I disagree about it not being great and not trying to encourage it.
     
  7. notnarbt

    notnarbt Senior Refuge Member

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    why do you say that clayton
     
  8. Clayton

    Clayton Moderator Moderator

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    Yellow-nut sedge is an excellent waterfowl food. I would put it in my top three waterfowl foods. I might even prefer to have it over a flooded corn field if it was in as solid of a stand as corn. It is often in scattered clumps and varying levels of tuber production so it can be hard to pinpoint to what level they are feeding on it versus the other plants present. Several years ago we had a near solid 5 acre stand with excellent tuber production that supported 20,000 - 25,000 mallards and black ducks for 6 weeks. They hit it the second there was a skim of water on it. I have observed waterfowl dig up tubers on "dry" yet soupy ground. I have watched ducks dig up tubers right beside a pile of corn on a rocket net site.
     
  9. barbelly

    barbelly Senior Refuge Member

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    I agree, duck will root the tubers like pigs. specks will do the same late season. I actually manage for the plant, I usually get millet and sprangletop along with it, so you have good producers with the chufa (yellow nutsedge), along with tubers is a great combo. Something to watch out for is to make sure it's chufa and not rusty sedge, which looks a lot like chufa, and doesn't have tubers.
     
  10. Matt P

    Matt P Elite Refuge Member

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    These pics look like Hydrolea, either H. ovata or H. uniflora. Notnbart did the plants have a thorn? They are not good food for much if this is them?
     

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