Preparing a Goose for Training

Discussion in 'Gun Dog Forum' started by Doc E, Nov 3, 2009.

  1. bandcollector

    bandcollector Elite Refuge Member

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    Well maybe so. Personally I used fresh geese and a dokken goose. It didn't take much to train them on those when they were already solid on ducks. We've used duct taped ducks and I figured it would be a good training tool with geese as well. But that was on more seasoned dogs. Freeze a whole bird and forget it!
     
  2. Doc E

    Doc E Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    If you use a whole unprocessed (still has breast meat) it can be considered "waste of game".
    That's why we gut them and breast them out.
    For an inexperienced dog, they need to not only where to take ahold of a goose, but also where not to take ahold of a goose. Using duct tape doesn't teach them where to not take ahold of a bird.

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  3. Call Turner

    Call Turner Senior Refuge Member

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    A couple of weeks ago,still in season. I was working my then 7 mo old chessie pup out front of my place with a semi frozen whole goose. WDFW drove up and stopped . I kept doing what I was doing and he watched from his truck. I waved and he pleasantly said hello. After a few minutes he asked if it was a fresh or frozen bird and I replied frozen . He watched for a while longer and asked about the pups age, then said have a nice day and drove off. Kinda weird having him in the area but oh well. No problems.
     
  4. Doc E

    Doc E Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    Good thing it was a State Warden and not a Fed.

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  5. Blackduck

    Blackduck Senior Refuge Member

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    It has been stated numerous times in this thread that freezing a whole bird for dog training is not wanton waste at the federal level.

    I know a lot of people who shoot "trash" ducks like buffleheads, mergansers, coots, sea ducks, etc with no purpose other than freezing them for dog training.

    In fact, I shoot a couple hooded mergansers each year for no purpose other than to give my friend some feathers for fly tying. The bird is otherwise worthless to me. I'm happy to save some minnows(future bass), and to give him the materials he needs to tie flies to catch the fish that I saved by killing the duck. Funny how it comes full circle.

    It seems to be a west coast/western part of the country thing to require you to take all the meat. When I was in Alaska I found out how anal that they are up there about not wasting a scrap of meat and writing BIG tickets if you don't scrape the ribs clean and get all other meat from the carcass. That's NUTS! The guys at the hunting store took great offense when I informed them that back home, east coast, we have so many deer that we only take the tenderloins and hindquarters, and the rest is for the buzzards. And we get unlimited doe tags. Shoot all you want. Then, to really top it off in their eyes, we get permits to shoot does all summer, and the permits require that you leave them lay and prohibit you from moving or using the animal. On one farm, 1000 acres, we get 70 summer doe permits. Shoot them and let them rot. Protects the crops. The state won't let you use the deer because then that might motivate someone to apply for the permits in order to "deer hunt" when the season is closed. The rationale being that if they've got to waste it, they'll only shoot it if it really is causing problems. But most rationale people will know that your true "killers" who have no sporting interests love the idea of shooting it and leaving it lay- it takes the guilt off the slob. Most guys would like to salvage the meat, and some do anyway. Oh, on the same farm, and others, there are also goose kill permits with the same rules. It's funny, if you shoot one out of season or one over the limit then it's big fines, big trouble, but if you wait until the breeding/raising season when they really should be protected then they'll hand out permits to anyone complaining to massacre them.
     
  6. Jay Mo 37

    Jay Mo 37 New Member

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    I'm not sure if it's legal or illegal here? But I've used frozen ducks & frozen snow geese to train my Lab. I've used the Doken goose, but now I will try this. Thanks for the info..
     
  7. DuckB

    DuckB Refuge Member

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    If you have your dog with you at the field, why not to train with the fresh goose? The plumage gets ugly looking but the meat is still fine to eat.
     
  8. bruce

    bruce Elite Refuge Member

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    GPS coordinates? Thanks, Fed waterfowl agent Bob.
     
  9. Doc E

    Doc E Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    Kind of depends on the age and size of the dog. I start training for geese when the pup is still too small to pick up a full bodied goose.
    I want my dog ready for geese before we go to the field.
    IMO, when you're hunting is not the time to train.

    A kid needs to learn how to spell before they go to the spelling bee.

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  10. DuckB

    DuckB Refuge Member

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    If you believe dog trainers, it is always training as there is no learning on-off switch. It really doesn't even matter that are you training during hunting or not unless it ruins the hunting for you and your buddies, but for the dog it doesn't matter.

    We don't have that many geese as you have, so you can't train your dog with real geese in off-hunting situations. Of course there is the option to use bumpers.
     

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