Put and take hunting...

Discussion in 'Upland Game Forum' started by Bryan Pettet, Jan 30, 2003.

  1. Bryan Pettet

    Bryan Pettet Refuge Member

    Messages:
    81
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Location:
    Alaska
    How many have hunted a preserve or something similar? I have not and often wondered what the attraction was in paying $20 a bird. It's not hard to pay that much by the time you add up a season's expenses but why add to the expense? I grew up in KS and never understood why out of staters would drive to KS to shoot in a preserve when there were birds all over...just knock on somebody's door, be polite, pick up your trash and close the gates.

    I understand if that's the easiest place to access in a given area and I understand how this would be good gun dog training. Any other thoughts from those who have done it?
     
  2. chow

    chow Refuge Member

    Messages:
    83
    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2002
    Location:
    Stacy MN
    My opinion is that I would never drive out of state to go hunting on a preserve or pay per bird. However our season in MN has been over now for quite awhile, and durring this time I have made it to a "game farm" several times. It is still fun to get out, give the dog some work and exersice, and put up a few birds. After all it's a LONG time till next fall...

    chow
     
  3. Bryan Pettet

    Bryan Pettet Refuge Member

    Messages:
    81
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Location:
    Alaska
    Getting a workout when the season is not open...that makes sense. Thanks for the reply.
     
  4. wingsnpaws

    wingsnpaws Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    221
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2002
    Location:
    Kansas
    I guide on a preserve and most of the people that go are there to have a good time with their friends. They don't want the hassle of walking miles to get some birds they just want to relax. Some are there to work their dogs and others come to learn. Preserves are a good controlled area to teach a new hunter how the dogs work, how the birds will react and how to be safe in the field. They are a good place to take a kid or a lady. They will be more likely to continue hunting if they have a good hunt when they begin. A preserve might not be for everyone but they do have their place. And if wild populations keep going down you will be seeing a lot more people turning to preserves.
     
  5. Woodstock

    Woodstock Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,305
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2002
    Location:
    Rockford, Kent County, MI
    In my part of the state of Michigan the hunters far outnumber the Pheasant population, as well as the available land to hunt them. (or so it seems) :mad: The regular season is quite short as well.

    A couple of years ago I broke down, opened the piggy bank, and joind a hunt club, when my labs were young and needing work. It was the best decision I've made in their training. I'll hunt every weekend this Feb. and part of March. :D

    My club offers a "scratch" hunting option which basically means that if there are open fields (not reserved) I'm welcome to hunt them for the day. And if I'm lucky enough to find some "left over" birds that I can successfully bag, they are only 1/2 the reg. price.

    I don't like that I have to pay at all, but I justify it that I get the benefit of lots of fresh air and many more days afield with the dogs that I would not otherwise have to enjoy. :cool:
     
  6. lookingforducks

    lookingforducks Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    334
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2000
    Location:
    Alabama
    It's a sad, but true commentary when you have to resort to this. In Alabama, an area that used to covered in quail, this is becoming the only way to get your dogs some work. I resisted, but now I enjoy it. Can't do it everytime out, but I try to go to one about every 6 weeks during the season. My setter doesn't seem to mind, and they taste just as good as a wild bird.
     
  7. lookingforducks

    lookingforducks Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    334
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2000
    Location:
    Alabama
    It's a sad, but true commentary when you have to resort to this. In Alabama, an area that used to be covered in quail, this is becoming the only way to get your dogs some work. I resisted, but now I enjoy it. Can't do it everytime out, but I try to go to one about every 6 weeks during the season. My setter doesn't seem to mind, and they taste just as good as a wild bird.
     
  8. Serial Killer

    Serial Killer Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    371
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2002
    Location:
    So close to Hell you can see sparks!
    Been getting in some put and take Quail hunting this year. In my case we buy the birds from a quail breeder. GO to a friends hunting club that has a lot of acreage in clear cut. It is about 2-3 years old. Now I have never done any other kind of quail hunting so I really don't know what I am missing. However, my boykin spaniel has been getting in plenty of work. On just about ever trip we bump the one or two local coveys while hunting the liberated birds. In this part of the country this is the only way to hunt them now days. The down side is the cost. Wish I could afford to hunt them every day.:cool:
     
  9. lad52

    lad52 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,527
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2002
    Location:
    Castle Rock, CO
    I won't do it here or in any other state. Half the fun is walking with the dog and the not knowing. I'd rather walk fields all day for 0 or 1 bird than hunt planted birds.
     
  10. Waders

    Waders Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    7,429
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2000
    Location:
    East River, SD
    Some guys drive hundreds and hundreds of miles to shoot pen raised pheasants. It's funny to see them with highly trained bird dogs and new filson gear and then they get all excited about shooting a bird that was just released. I don't mind them doing it but don't understand why all the hassle when they could be going after real birds.
     

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