question about snowgoose decoys

Discussion in 'Decoy Forum' started by Pastor, Oct 15, 2017.

  1. Pastor

    Pastor Senior Refuge Member

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    Snows fly over us but rarely ever show any interest in landing and seem to always just fly high and keep going. I've never successfully pulled them down in our area but I've never had snow decoys. And before last year I had never decoyed Canada's or had any Canada decoys. While Canada goose hunting and a small spread of Canada decoys out I would blow my Canada call at the snows with no luck. I understand that there is always the chance that a bird will just commit suicide but I would it be worth my time to and money to invest in a few snowgoose decoys and if I do will the Canada's shy away from them. I figure the ducks might like them but not sure about how the canadas will react.

    Let's say I'm setting up for ducks and geese on the pond I normally hunt. Would I mix them with my Canada decoys or make a separate group of them off to the side. Maybe mix them in the ducks or maybe put the ducks between the Canada's and the snows. And how few could I get away with. Would they even respond to a Canada call or am I dreaming.

    Hope all this rambling makes since.
     
  2. goosenazi

    goosenazi Elite Refuge Member

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    Snow decoys will improve your odds. As will a snow call provided you learn how to blow it well. I’d try separating the snows and canadas first. Try different stuff until something works. Then keep changing until you find something that works better
     
  3. GUNNERX2

    GUNNERX2 Elite Refuge Member

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    Pastor, I will share this.
    My son & I hunt a 2 acre pasture pond and is very good for Canadas. Occasionally, a snow goose would be in with a flock of Canadas and they would be the first to fall in the ensuing volley. We purchased a half dozen snow decoys and would set them off to the side. The Canadas absolutely refused to come into the set. Took down the snows and the Canadas worked the set as normal (we never tried mixing them in).
    On that same pond, I was hunting alone on a bright and very windy day (25-30 mph) when I noticed pairs of snows traveling from east to west very high and silent. It was always a pair and they were spaced out about 10 minutes apart, 3 or 4 pairs. To my amazement, one pair locked up and sailed down to the pond. They circled the pond several times, never uttering a sound. I kept silent as well. Finally, they swung within 25 yards of me and I hauled down on the left bird only to cripple the right bird. The wind had blown my pattern to the right. The cripple sailed to the opposite side of the pond but I was able to chase it down after a couple hundred yards and bagged his buddy as well when it tried to set down next to him. I had the second bird mounted and the taxi said it was a greater snow from the east coast.
     
  4. Juvie Juke Box

    Juvie Juke Box Senior Refuge Member Sponsor

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    Where are you hunting? Hunting snows over just water is typically tougher than hunting them in a field or a field/water combo. Ducks probably won't mind the snow floaters but honkers may not want anything to do with them. Realistically adding only a few dozen probably won't result in bagging very many snows, but give it a shot and see what happens!
     
  5. Pastor

    Pastor Senior Refuge Member

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    It's basically just a 1 acre pond surrounded by several ponds. Some smaller and some bigger. I hunt the most ducky pond if that makes since. It's in a vineyard and there is a couple ponds I won't hunt that the Canada's roost on. But I've been pretty successful pulling Canada's down as they travel back and fourth. There are corn fields close but I don't have permission to hunt them. The ducks seem to always pick the pond I hunt I think because of the lay of the land. Just seems more inviting to them I guess. I can hunt any of the ponds but being a working vineyard the one I always hunt has the least amount of disturbance from everyday farming. Most of the Canada's are local birds but these aren't park birds. The public is not allowed in the vineyard and they get hunted on surrounding farms as well.

    It's pretty common to have high flying snows pass over while hunting but sometimes when the ceiling is low they are plenty low enough to see the decoys and hear the call but always just keep going. There are headed a hundred miles south of us to one of Missouri's big refuges called otter slough.

    I guess they know where their going and we are to close ro the refuge for them to want to stop but to far away to benefit from them wintering there.

    Sorry for the babbling but I am a pastor lol
     
  6. Rick Hall

    Rick Hall Elite Refuge Member

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    Might be different where you are, but a few dozen snow goose decoys is a giant flashing "HUNTERS HERE" sign in my part of the country.

    Unless they're crippled or otherwise desperate to be down, and likely tollable by calling alone, snows and blues are looking for the security of thousands of their kin on the ground, and unless you can replicate that, I'd think your spread more apt to look like a lot of other spots with hopeful guns, which many otherwise workable Canadas may have learned to avoid, as well.
     
    GUNNERX2 likes this.
  7. wtrfwlr43

    wtrfwlr43 Elite Refuge Member

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    Snows and Canadas. Pastor I don't know what type Canadas you are hunting but my experience is that Big Canadas totally avoid a decoy spread with snows. Little Canadas do not mind the snows at all, they will decoy to a spread with both Canada and snow decoys.
     
    Ringbill likes this.
  8. Pastor

    Pastor Senior Refuge Member

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    They are the giant canadas. Really big birds. I've never seen the small variety. I don't think we get them here
     
  9. Ringbill

    Ringbill Elite Refuge Member Flyway Manager

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    In my experience, I'd leave the snows alone, to do their thing. They surely are a whole different bird.
    Stick with your spread of Honkers & ducks. The snows aren't worth any effort there IMO, until you hunt them with an all out effort geared just for snows.

    Ringbill
     

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