Questions about cork...

Discussion in 'Duck & Goose Calling Forum' started by Paul Tidwell, Dec 11, 2018.

  1. freefall

    freefall Elite Refuge Member

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    Lodi, CA

    Not true at all.

    Buy a reed kit through Upperduck and find the reed that best fits your style or air presentation.

    The added back pressure makes it a dream to use & I pull ducks just as far as other guys.

    The tone on it is a clear rasp with more built in whine on the end if you want it.

    It's my #1 call for now backed up by a bored XR2. Until I get my Alpha....
     
  2. California Flyway

    California Flyway Elite Refuge Member

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    Totally agree and support Lares calls for a number of reasons, they are very stick resistant, and no cork to worry about. I personally think the Hybrid is the most versatile call to have in their lineup.

    The wine industry is responsible for scooping up the best grade cork.

    You do not even need a jig, just take a single edge razor blade and cut down to size. Cut them a little thick and sand down to size. As has been stated, do not try to force a cork that is too thick into the wedge as you can break the insert. That is the most expensive part of the call to replace.
     
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  3. callinfowl

    callinfowl Kalifornia Forum Moderator

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    "tone is somewhat tinny or thin sounding."
    Stick a longer reed in it and put a little more @zz into it. No way is a Lares tinny or thin sounding if you're blowing it right.
     
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  4. Paul Tidwell

    Paul Tidwell Refuge Member

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    Dec 5, 2018
    Sounds good... is that a T1? I am running the longest reed that came in the Lares tuning kit, but tried them all.

    I didn't mean to imply that it wasn't meaty and powerful. And again, I really do like it. Thin was mostly meant to describe tonal range (it's all on top) And perhaps "glassy" is a better word than tinny. Are you a musician? Think carbon fiber body guitar v. spruce and rosewood.
     

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