Quick question

Discussion in 'Gun Dog Forum' started by Redlabhunter, Nov 7, 2017.

  1. Redlabhunter

    Redlabhunter New Member

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    I have a male lab that is slightly over a year old, and this season will be his first in the field. I have sent him to a trainer and also worked with him myself. My questions are 1. while dove hunting and during teal season he gets really excited while sitting next to me and any move i make after the shot or sometimes if a dove passes a little out of range and i put my gun down he runs out (breaks). Note this is not an every bird occurrence and when it happens i use the e collar and call him back. is there anything i can be doing besides this? and also when i work on blind retrieves he runs about 10 feet and stops and looks to me for further instructions, so how would one fix this? this is my first retriever so all tips are appreciated.
     
  2. stevena198301

    stevena198301 Elite Refuge Member

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    Some say they tether their dogs.
     
  3. bullpinnie

    bullpinnie Elite Refuge Member

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    train, train,train.......
    and then train some more!

    Have reasonable expectations for your dog.

    tie him up if you have to, but don't be surprised if other guys don't want to hunt over your dog.
     
  4. KwickLabs

    KwickLabs Elite Refuge Member

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    "I have a male lab......this season will be his first in the field........he runs out (breaks)......when I work on blind retrieves he runs about
    10 feet and stops and looks to me for further instructions, so how would one fix this? this is my first retriever so all tips are appreciated."

    If it were my dog, they would not be hunting. My dogs must be steady, be able to pick up a simple double and run a blind before they do any hunting.
    Given that, my advice would be to forget about this hunting season and train for next year. Do what the dog needs. :reader
     
  5. ABREOJOS

    ABREOJOS Elite Refuge Member

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    One year old is very young. As you probably realize, a dog coming back from a trainer after a few months is a work in progress, not a machine. I have always spent the first few hunts with a young dog concentrating on the dog not shooting at the birds. I let my buddies do most of shooting and I correct him on steadiness with the ecollar.

    It would be highly unusual for a dog to be proficient at blind retrieves at such an early age. You need to train some more. At the end of the morning shoot do some sight blinds to help make the transition from training to a hunting situation.
     
  6. teul2

    teul2 Senior Refuge Member

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    It sounds like you have a lot more training than a "quick question" can answer.
    All responses above are correct. Taking a young dog hunting with the deficiencies mentioned is only going to compound them. You need to train in a controlled environment where you can focus on each individual issue separately. Hunting is anything but a controlled environment.

    Start with the breaking. This really sounds to me like the dog has never had any denials. Every bumper thrown, he has been able to go get. So start there. Tie the dog to a tree or hold him on a lead rope. Have someone throw marks for you while you are there with the dog. Let him go get the first one. Then you go and pick up the next 3 while he stays in his place. If he breaks for the bumper, "No, nick, no" with the e-collar and jerk the lead rope. This is something that is a good thing to do even to older, well experienced dogs. They have to remember that they don't always get to go get the birds.

    The "popping" is another issue all together. It is going to require pile work, that I am probably not able to communicate correctly here. So I'll abstain from explanation on that.
     
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  7. Redlabhunter

    Redlabhunter New Member

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    The statement made about him going get every bumper ever thrown is correct. I am going to try not letting him go get every bumper. As far as pile work. Do you have any drills on that? The videos on YouTube and stuff in movies just show finished dogs doing the drills so can’t learn how to correct while doing the drills. Thanks
     
  8. KwickLabs

    KwickLabs Elite Refuge Member

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    Here is a link to a great deal of free information on just about any segment of training one could need
    (maybe, too much). Advanced skills are accomplished by building on simpler skills. It is a gradual process
    done in a seamless sequence.

    A steady dog needs basic skills which must be taught before asking a retriever to be steady to marks.
    Done seamlessly and gradually, correcting is not a major component of training. If a dog is not doing
    the right thing often. then teaching is the problem.

    A major part of successful training consists of regularly asking "What does my dog need to know (in
    place, known skills) before attempting to do what is presently being taught?"

    You want a steady dog? What must he know before that becomes a reality? Keep in mind he will not
    become steady by correcting him mostly because 1) he has no reason to, 2 a correction only works
    when the dog has been taught the correct behavior and 3) when done correctly many times it is a
    conditioned response that is rewarding (dog wants to do it).

    Just saying "sit" is not enough and it won't be until that skill becomes important to the dog. Like in
    "When I sit good things happen." This must be repeated correctly many, many times. Your dog should
    be excited and having fun. Start teaching.

    https://web.archive.org/web/20031202021121/http:/www.arhrc.com/Library.html
     
  9. duck dawg

    duck dawg Senior Refuge Member

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    Take a look at the Smartwork DVD's by Evan Graham.
     
  10. Redlabhunter

    Redlabhunter New Member

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    Thanks I’ll give them a look!
     

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