Remove Gamey Taste/This is How I Age Duck

Discussion in 'Cooking Forum' started by ValleyFlak, Dec 26, 2011.

  1. ValleyFlak

    ValleyFlak Elite Refuge Member

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    Well, that's another reason a long salt water soak might not be a good idea. Thanks for posting this. Eventually I may get that man-fridge going in the garage too!
     
  2. Texans84

    Texans84 Senior Refuge Member

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    Ok here's an update. I started the process on 11-7. On day 3 I padded them dry again and flipped them. I did it again on day 4 and there was not much moisture/blood left. Both the salt and non-salted seem to be aging at the same rate. A few of the smaller teal breasts are starting to get dark/harder with some being very hard on the edges that will have to be cut off. The meat is definitely starting to break down. I may go ahead and cook a single breast from each tray and get a feel for what the taste is like so far. I'm thinking just a little salt and pepper on each one and cook it in olive oil in a pan to try to get a good base for what each tastes like. Here are a few more pics:

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    I think all of the little tenderloin pieces are done so I will cook them up too.
     
  3. ValleyFlak

    ValleyFlak Elite Refuge Member

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    Did you try any yet? Just wondering how they tasted.
     
  4. Texans84

    Texans84 Senior Refuge Member

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    Ok the results are in. There appeared to be zero difference between the ones that soaked in salt water vs. the ones that soaked in just tap water. I honestly think the Scaup I did (salt water) whole was better than the teal (tap water) but I did just barely overcook the teal while the Scaup came out perfectly. The main thing I notices is that the meat was super tender, yet slightly springy so it wasn't mushy or anything. I only lightly salt & peppered one side of everything. I had some that I overcooked, some that came out perfectly, and some in between. All were very good and NONE were dry or livery like what usually happens when you overcook. Here are some pics:

    Cooked in a little bit of oil and onions in a skillet. To the left of the onions are the salt water side:

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    Some of the meat was done fajita style:

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    I trimmed off the hard pieces on the edge:

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    Lightly salt and peppered:

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    Smelled great! Something I noticed and I think you can see it in the picture; the teal breast on the right of this pic is showing several little blood spots. That was a result of the light salt and peppering; everywhere a grain of salt was produced this small amount of blood to pool at the surface. The left Scaup breast was soaked in salt water and looked normal when seasoned:

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    Cooked. They didn't seem to shrivel up quite as much as when you normally cook a whole breast:

    [​IMG]




    All in all the texture of the meat is pretty much a nice and tender filet. Aging them pretty much cancels out all the gamey flavor so they will take on seasoning or marinades really well. I froze some to see how they will hold up and I plan on bacon wrapping those. I probably wont do anymore small ducks, but it is a great option if you have the room in the fridge for some big ducks.
     
  5. duckblind

    duckblind Senior Refuge Member

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    Thanks again for the pics and info:tu Going to have to give this a try
     
  6. ValleyFlak

    ValleyFlak Elite Refuge Member

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    I still dry age teal but they are on a separate tray and very little ventilation, those get cooked between days 4, 5 and 6 and they don't have the dried out, shrunked look and no jerky edges.
     
  7. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator Flyway Manager

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    I just cooked up some duck breasts, on birds I let hang about 5 days. All I did was pound them about 1/2 way flat, bread, and fry to rare/med rare (chicken fry, in other words). Then, after they set for a while, I cut them into strips, then put in a couple spoons of Giardiniera - Marinated Pepper Mix - Mild
    http://peppers.com/cube/Peppers-Pic...talian-style-Three-Bottle-Pack/prod_3191.html

    IGO4DUX75 got to taste some today, and he asked me what cut of beef it was. He thought it was ribeye.
     
  8. ValleyFlak

    ValleyFlak Elite Refuge Member

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    No argument about how great hanging birds for days tastes. Aging works!:amen

    ps. post a pic of the finished product on a plate next time...probably looks as good as it reads.
     
  9. Texans84

    Texans84 Senior Refuge Member

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    Nice. I would be aging mine whole in my outside fridge but it crapped out on me right before duck season. It seems like the easiest way would be to hang them or in the fridge for the 5 days. Maybe I can talk my fiance into letting me keep them in our fridge.
     
  10. Coho

    Coho Moderator Emeritus Moderator

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    A old fridge is the garage or porch for game is a wise investment. Aging, brining, drying, etc..
    Kinda fun to watch my kids friends gab a pop and see 5-14 ducks aging..:l:l
     

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