Canadian Hunters Forum Sponsors

saskatchewan situational hunting status..

Discussion in 'Canadian Hunters Forum' started by ALLSTAR 1, Oct 22, 2012.

  1. mrmallerd

    mrmallerd Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    6,621
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2002
    Location:
    southern illinois

    How true, but if it were not for the chance of a hunt of a lifetime, I doubt many would drive 24 hours for a sunset, watching a friend miss or a dog retrieve. Most can experinence this in their backyard. They can also witness the slob hunter, the greedy guide, etc at home. Canada is a beautiful vast country, I find myself driving farther, working harder, and learning from others mistakes.
     
  2. Biggar2000

    Biggar2000 Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    261
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Louisiana
    I have had these in the prairies of Saskatchewan:

    Watch a big Golden Eagle come in and take a goose right out of the decoys you just shot.

    Watch a buddy make a triple on three different species, canvasback, mallard, pintail.

    See the Northern Lights while you are putting out the dekes in a pea field.

    Watch a hawk for 20 minutes eye your 4 mallards sitting at your side on a little pothole, that you just shot. He sits and bobs on an old fence post, wanting those ducks, but there is some blob sitting by them that seems out of place. The hawk makes noises I have never heard straining to look and I grin behind my face mask, finally all I do is lift a finger and he is gone.

    Eat some of the best fried rice you have ever had in a cafe at a Shell station run by a nice family, same goes for barley soup.

    Drink a cold Labatts Lite in the field after the hunt and stir fry a bunch of specklebelly breast in the fryer you brought up with onions and peppers and Cajun seasoning.

    Cook a ton of ducks and geese at the little hotel you stay at and the whole town turns out to eat and drink, cook turns over his kitchen to the Cajun boys.

    Get stuck so bad it takes a pile of Hutterites and a BIG OL tractor to get the truck and trailer out.

    Walk thru old barns and houses at old home places, think man it is desolate out here on the prairie.

    Blank some days, then set up in the snow, silos only, freeze!!! Use sheets from the hotel to cover blinds, wind blowing 30 mph plus, bout to give up everybody says this is where they were last nite feeding, they are late coming back if at all, then somebodys says get in the blinds, they are coming.
    They are heading in 6 feet off the ground, hour or so later, blood everywhere in the snow on you. Dog went nuts. Birds everywhere, they kept coming.
     
  3. rdj.olympia

    rdj.olympia Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    621
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Location:
    washington
    It is sad to see the transformation we have seen in the past 10 years in Canada. I have always been of the opinion that water fowling in Canada is something that all waterfowl hunters have to experience at least once in their lifetime and I have taken other hunters there to give them their once in a lifetime experience. I am blessed that I am able to hunt in the same areas my grandfather hunted in the 50's & 60's so when I drive those dirt roads I see something different than a pile of birds or pictures on the internet, or leg bands or any other trophy we might equate to a successful hunt. To me it is about the time spent with farmers, hunter & huets. I don't know if these experiences give me a different perspective than those that have hunted as a guest of a guide or other hunter. I think having worked as hard as I have to be successful gives me a more appreciation for what Canada has to offer. I predicted about 8 years ago that things were going to change and for the worse. You have more and more guides now than we did before and a bunch of American hunters who pay $3,000 for a few days of hunting and when they are done think "hell for $3,000 I can buy a bunch of decoys & trailer and I can do this." Unfortunately we are seeing more and more people that expect that money buys them privilege and access and have little concern for anyone other than themselves first and foremost before other hunters and farmers. In their mind it is their ?right? to be able to hunt in Canada because they have spent a little money. I have had a couple of experience where one guy said ?you can?t tie up that field, I have $10,000 worth of decoys in this trailer and I plan on using them.? He hoped out of his truck and asked the guy on the combine if it was ok to hunt after I had spoken with the farmer. We had another encounter where we had a discussion with another hunter and he wanted to know ?who makes up these rules that if you have permission to hunt it and the farmer expects you to be there or give him a call?? Common courtesy was not in his vocabulary for sure. What is sad is that there are lots of birds and lots of opportunity for EVERYONE. Just try to be a little more considerate of others and we can all have a good time. If someone is on a hot field drive 5 miles and find another field. All you have to do is look, there are lots of opportunities for all. Don?t try so hard to figure out how you are going to pinch the other hunter or be there before them in the morning just work a little harder. Canada is a huge place with lots and lots of room for everyone if you try to play nice. In my humble opinion. Rdj
     
  4. Biggar2000

    Biggar2000 Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    261
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Louisiana
    Big Country with plenty of room for everyone just have to leave the masses and go strike out and find your spot or spots. Good advice we took it in the early 2000s and left the populated areas and had to put some drive time in and it pays off. No outfitters and only a hunter or two. Old couple with a Subaru Forester from California I think and their lab, freelancing the prairies, we laughed at em, man you are going to stick that thing and wind up walking for miles. Saw them 2001 and 2002, it rained we got stuck they laughed and the little Subaru just kept on chugging thru the junk. They had a few dekes their guns, the dog and their stuff. They joined us for the week lost track of them now, lost his email and have not seen them since 02.

    A few klicks down the road may just be the field or pothole for you, go explore
     
  5. theduckguru

    theduckguru Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,195
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2003
    Location:
    ohio
    I think this year was extremely rough for snow goose hunting. I did not see a fraction of the snow geese I normally see in one large geographic area of 4500 sq miles. This likely crowded hunters into various pockets. I heard reports that some of the guides were not getting along with each other this year with some stretching their territories and causing bad blood. SK has also been relatively wet the last 7 years, if SK is entering a dry period, things are really going to get interesting.

    Maybe SK should reduce the limit to 10 snow geese a day, go back to 2 days possession for all waterfowl, and reduce the number of outfitter licenses to resolve the issue and bring back some quality hunting. I know I would support it over the manditory guided hunting for non-residents or the 1 week license initiatives the guides have supported the last several years.

    I sometimes wonder what waterfowl hunting in SK will look like when snow geese return to historic populations. Eventually they will and the dark geese and ducks won't support all the hunters currently going to SK. The positive is you will be able to buy really cheap snow geese decoys.
     
  6. kaiserduckhelm

    kaiserduckhelm Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    794
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2007
    Location:
    Nebraska
    Lots more hunters this year for us to. In years past we were able to watch mutiple fields and discuss a gameplan at dinner on what field to ask on. We could call the landowner after we ate and get on it no problem. It was very relaxing and took alot of stress off our shoulders knowing this. This year if you didnt call the landowners cell the second the birds hit the field you were S.O.L. And if you did get on a hot field someone was setting up under the flightline towards your field or trying to pass shoot the flightline sending most of the birds in another direction. Lots of newer snow hunters this year also. Most had a coulple hundred rags and 5-6 hunters in layouts tring to hunt lentils and wondering why they couldnt break single digits on the mornings hunt. Ross and speck numbers were down in our area considerable this year compared to the last 5. As always though it was great seeing our friends up there and the beer always tastes better north of the border.
     
  7. Geese Police

    Geese Police Refuge Member

    Messages:
    85
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2005
    Location:
    Riverside Illinois

    Where can I find that law? Been hunting Sask for years and thought permission was a must.
     
  8. bang you'r dead

    bang you'r dead Canada Forum Mod. Eh! Moderator Flyway Manager

    Messages:
    9,820
    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2003
    Location:
    The Pas Manitoba
    Permission required only if land is posted. Common courtesy dictates you should ask anyway.
     
  9. Geese Police

    Geese Police Refuge Member

    Messages:
    85
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2005
    Location:
    Riverside Illinois
    Always have, always will, but I was unaware that the law says only if posted. This years regulation guide instructs hunters to always ask permission (page 10 or 11 I think).
     
  10. theduckguru

    theduckguru Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,195
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2003
    Location:
    ohio
    The proper answer is there is no law stating you don't have to ask permission. The law states you must ask permission if the land is posted in contrast to many states in the US where you must ask permission before hunting.
     

Share This Page