Size of impoundment

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by thatguy2, Nov 10, 2013.

  1. mister gadwall

    mister gadwall Senior Refuge Member

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    our place has a water control device and is planted annually with sorghum, corn, millet etc. DRAINED POST SEASON EACH YEAR. we did soil tests and added clay to areas that needed less porous bottom, otherwise rich bottomland dirt. After decades of same plants the seed production is declining, even with fertilizer. Area is fed by a small year round spring system and rainwater....dyke was cut in a key trench then filled with rock compacted to make it water tight. HAD access to good construction and earthmoving equipment at the time and "did it right'. Have tried to use the gobbler oak or sawtooth oak early acorn trees but may be too far north to get the acorn production proponents of those trees claim in deep south. All of this was done prior to wetland permitting requirements that may now affect where and how such a area can be built.
     
  2. KAHunter

    KAHunter Senior Refuge Member

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    If you are going to do four acres and you are mostly concerned with hunting results, I would highly recommend planting it all in corn. Ours is 6 acres and we messed with sorghum and then corn natural then corn jap millet buckwheat, etc and we now do all corn.
     
  3. thatguy2

    thatguy2 Senior Refuge Member

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    Round these parts when milo has been flooded to the heads you damn near can't shoot the ducks out of it.
     
  4. jasonb

    jasonb Senior Refuge Member

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    If I'm only planning to flood it to about knee high, is corn still the best option? Is there a good variety of corn that doesn't grow as tall?
     
  5. Drake11

    Drake11 Senior Refuge Member

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    At knee depth I would look at a combination of different millets. Not saying corn wouldn't work but millet is a favorite of mine.

    Sorghum/Milo is another option (as mentioned above) but again, getting the water as close to the heads as possible is a huge plus.

    Smartweed would do the trick as well!

    RLM
     
  6. MAJ MALFUNCTION

    MAJ MALFUNCTION Senior Refuge Member

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    Something I don't see mentioned that often (when talking about what to plant) is how much of what you plant might get wiped out by other critters. On our place the deer will really put the hurt on sorghum/milo and also are pretty hard on jap millet. The deer literally bite the seed heads off and we can be left with a pretty barren marsh.

    Corn does not work at all for us - the pigs will tear it up well before any ducks have a chance at it.

    We seem to have the best luck with Chufa, Browntop Millet and moist soil (as far as groceries that the other critters will leave for the ducks). I would also like to try rice next year - can't imagine the deer or pigs being interested in rice.
     
  7. Clayton

    Clayton Elite Refuge Member

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    You must have one hell of a deer population as I have never heard of issues with deer eating milo or millet around here despite them being pretty common. Now the difference may be the abundance of corn and soybeans in the immediate area so they have plenty of other choices.
     
  8. MAJ MALFUNCTION

    MAJ MALFUNCTION Senior Refuge Member

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    Yes sir, we do have a very healthy deer population.

    I think you hit the nail on the head, though - there is NO agriculture in our immediate area (just lots of wooded land and cattle ranches).
     
  9. mister gadwall

    mister gadwall Senior Refuge Member

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    we literally cannot keep deer from destroying corn or milo in our impoundment plantings. tried everything from mule tape, human excrement fertilizer spread throughout fields, irish spirng soap bars hung throughout field...you name it. this yr they ate 75 % of corn stalks down to a foot high stub before the ears ever formed.
     
  10. Clayton

    Clayton Elite Refuge Member

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    Sounds like both of you need to take up deer (doe) hunting!
     

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