Slow Growth

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by Jawhawk, Oct 2, 2017.

  1. hhpage

    hhpage Senior Refuge Member

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    I would agree with JFG. Japanese millet tolerates flooding; that doesn't necessarily mean that it performs best when flooded. As long as the millet is not drought stressed it should produce just fine. I doubt you have time for the milo to make. Several years ago I planted jap millet, Egyptian wheat (essentially a tall sorghum/sudan grass variety) and WGF sorghum on July 7th. It grew extremely well (picture taken 10/2 of that year) until we had a killing frost on 10/31. It had fully headed out but did not make hard seed.

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  2. thatguy2

    thatguy2 Senior Refuge Member

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    IMG_2848.JPG IMG_2847.JPG IMG_2846.JPG Mixture of Egyptian wheat and a Sudan grass hybrid I am using as a shield from the road. The others are my quail foodplot mix the state gives out. Forage sorghum, grain sorghum, proso millet.
     
  3. Hunter/Gather

    Hunter/Gather Elite Refuge Member

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    Man I'd love to have habitat like that and grassland quail that go with it. Our quail thrive on steep and dense, but at least our ducks have better sense. :l
     
  4. thatguy2

    thatguy2 Senior Refuge Member

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    I am trying. Quail population is low here so the state has an initiative to try and bring them back. Habitat has really become an issue. Fescue encroachment and woody invasion being big ones. I am seeing a lot more native grasses since I put fire back. The state is also giving me native grass seed to help me tackle a brome and fescue problem I am solving. I'm out building brush piles today. There is a huge one right on the west edge of that food plot. And a smaller one on the south side. Putting one on the north side out of the wind today. Havent shot a quail off my place yet.
     
  5. hhpage

    hhpage Senior Refuge Member

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    I am also working hard on quail habitat, though I'm not sure I ever will be able to make myself shoot any of them. In four years I have seen a dramatic increase in my quail population. The first two years I rarely saw or heard birds; the past two years I have routinely seen singles and pairs during nesting season and rarely go out without hearing multiple bobs whistle during spring and summer.

    I try to burn half of my place each year in 10-20 acre blocks that are separated by unburned blocks. I have done a lot of strip disking and I plant firebreaks and other linear food plots in egyptian wheat and partridge pea to create better brood habitat and winter cover. I have also sprayed a ton of imazapyr to get rid of sweetgum and bermuda grass and stimulate forb production. It's been a lot of work, but it's also been a lot of fun and very rewarding. My place will never be premium duck hunting, but the duck hunting is solid and I also have excellent deer and turkey populations. I guess I have reached that point where habitat improvement is more fulfilling than killing?
     
  6. thatguy2

    thatguy2 Senior Refuge Member

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    I am currently that way. Kill turkeys every year off my small place. 163" whitetail last fall. I think I'll have duck hunting if the pond ever fills, and I had a couple good dove shoots in Sept. I've tried for quail a couple times but only once saw them and it was thick cover. I do see woodcocks on a regular basis spring and fall.
    The state quail biologist for this area was a year younger than me and graduated in my wife's class. He has been out several times advising me.
     
  7. Albino Woodie

    Albino Woodie Senior Refuge Member

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    Quail can be tough, i wish you good luck in managing for them. I used to help with the CURE program when i worked for the NCWRC. I was just an extra hand when it came time for big burns or projects. It really takes a lot of hard work and a lot of land owners and agencies applying the same management practices and goals to be successful at restoring or developing early-successional habitats.
     
  8. Timber Hole

    Timber Hole Senior Refuge Member

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    In the last couple of years I've come to realize that the habitat projects are more fun than the hunting..........and that's saying a lot. I have plans for everything from wood duck boxes to bees to milkweed for the butterfly's. I'm currently overhauling tractors so I'll have the equipment I need for these projects. The habitat projects also provide for enjoyment of the land year round.
     
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  9. thatguy2

    thatguy2 Senior Refuge Member

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    This was my first year for bees. Ended up with a gallon of honey. Made some mistakes and next year will be better. Planning on adding another hive or two. Hive beetles drove me crazy this year. Buddy lost a whole hive to them.
     
  10. Timber Hole

    Timber Hole Senior Refuge Member

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    I have a buddy that's a bee keeper so I'll be relying on him to point me in the right direction. The honey will be a nice bonus but I also like promoting pollination.
     

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