Suggestions for cooking wild turkey

Discussion in 'Cooking Forum' started by 3drahthaars, May 25, 2014.

  1. 3drahthaars

    3drahthaars Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,486
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2002
    Location:
    North Carolina
    I shot my first wild turkey this spring, and I was surprised at how mild the smell of it was from the gutting to just the smell of the flesh.

    Because of that I'm afraid of over powering it when i cook it.

    I waited too long to pluck... so I wound up breasting it out and cutting off the legs and thighs... saved the neck for sauerkraut.

    Any suggestions, grill, deep fry, etc.

    3ds
     
  2. Sasha and Abby

    Sasha and Abby Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    4,672
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2002
    Location:
    Columbia, SC.
    Soup:
    Wild Turkeys are such amazing birds, it is a crime to not utilized the legs just because they are a little tough. They have the BEST flavor though. Boil the legs/thighs on med for 3-5 hours covered until tender - old birds are tough. The longer the better. you will have to keep adding water. pick all meat from bones removing cartledge set aside. Start with a can of cream of chicken and can of water. add cup of frozen string beans, corn, butterbeans, celery, onions, okra. Add enough chicken stock to cover. Add a 28 oz can of diced tomatoes and cook for 90 minutes. salt/pepper(chicken stock has a LOT of salt already in it) to taste. Best soup ever.



    WildTurkey Breast With Basil and Sundried Tomatoes in a White Wine Cream Sauce over Egg Noodles:

    Take one side of breast and a fillet knife. Cut chunks out of it and slice very thin medallions. Thinner the better. (Throw away all silverskin, connecting tissue etc... chewy/tough) Brown all the cut turkey in a chunk of butter until ALMOST done. Remove. Clarify a cup or so of chopped shallots . Add a tablespoon of reg flour and stir until browned. Turn on HIGH and add a cup + of any white wine and deglaze the pan - stir. Add a 10-15 basil leaves (chopped) from your garden. Add 3/4 of a 16 oz jar of julienne cut sundried tomatos packed in olive oil. Try NOT to add anymore of the oil when adding the tomatoes - it will make it too greasy. Fold back in the turkey and add about 6/10 of a quart of Half and Half. Bring to boil and then cut back and let simmer for at least 50 minutes... Stir occasionally. It should be very thick when done. Serv over Wide Egg Noodles or dumplings.

    I eat a LOT of wild turkey and have done it every way imaginable. These two recipes are what I came up with and are far and away the BEST WILD TURKEY you will ever eat.
     
  3. duckblind

    duckblind Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    155
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2009
    Location:
    OH
    Slice thin. Lite breading in flour, salt and pepper. Fry in cast iron skillet for a few minutes each side!
     
  4. klitzy38

    klitzy38 Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    386
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2014
    Location:
    Kansas
    Cut into strips, marinate in Italian dressing over night, wrap in bacon, and grill.
     
  5. kjrice

    kjrice Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,297
    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2002
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
    I simply like sprinkling Slap Ya Mama on it. Wild turkey is so good!
     
  6. LiamSmith

    LiamSmith New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2015
    I'll definitely use all these recipes one by one! Sounds really tasty!
     
  7. 3drahthaars

    3drahthaars Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,486
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2002
    Location:
    North Carolina
    On our last trip to NOLA, a woman stopped us from picking up some Tony Chacherie's sp? and told us that SYM was her favorite... we got some.

    It was OK. I use them all, but I really like Tony's the best.

    3ds
     
  8. kjrice

    kjrice Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,297
    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2002
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
    TC spice and herbs is good but SYM is the one for me. Killer on pork chops, steak, chicken...
     
  9. tomturkey

    tomturkey Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,324
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2002
    Location:
    Oceana county Michigan
    I pluck all of my wild turkeys. The feathers come offreal easy if you scald them in boiling water.

    They are then roasted in a bag being careful to not over cook them. I generally roast them the day before I plan on serving them, carve them after they have cooled and pour a little of the liquid out of the bag on the meat to maintain the moisture in the meat.
     
  10. fowlwhacker

    fowlwhacker Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,807
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2003
    Location:
    Maryland Chesapeake Bay
    I like to breast them, butter the breast, season them and smoke them. I use an old charcoal brinkman smoker smoking over a water pan. My wife argued with me one Thanksgiving about cooking my first turkey and taking it to her parents house thinking no one would like it. I had it all sliced up nice and on a plate. Mother in-law cooked up some supersized butter ball along with a ham. some folks asked what the deal was with my bird and I told them it was a wild bird smoked fresh. A couple of folks tried it and before long the plate was empty. Everyone was pleasantly surprised and we all had a bunch of my mother in-laws butter ball to take home for left overs.

    Legs are always best for soup in my opinion due to them being a bit tough.
     

Share This Page