SWLA marsh plant ID help

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by DuxSausage, Sep 25, 2017.

  1. DuxSausage

    DuxSausage New Member

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    Can anyone help me ID this plant??

    Its in the marsh in SWLA. The water is usually about knee high but is almost 2 ft high from all the rain we got from Hurricane Harvey. A few years ago it was full of widgeon grass but dried up during the summer and hasn't had any grass in it until now.

    Not sure it's widgeon grass b/c of how brown it is...maybe it turned brown from being completely submerged for a few weeks? Thoughts?

    DJI_0117.JPG DJI_0120.JPG
     
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  2. boatdriver

    boatdriver Refuge Member

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    What type of marsh are you in? Better yet, what's your general location? Not needing specific locations, but it looks like I can see a little bit of wiregrass (Spartina patens), but I can't tell exactly. More than likely, it's either wigeongrass or southern Naiad. Gonna depend on the salinity of your marsh.
     
  3. DuxSausage

    DuxSausage New Member

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    Cameron parish. Its a brackish marsh but has stayed pretty fresh with all the rain we've had the last couple years.

    This pond is landlocked but we have a couple other blinds in the area where the ponds all connect and those have had a lot of widgeon grass around them the last 2-3 years.

    2 weeks ago we flew the drone over to look and couldn't see any grass bc of how high the water was but it has dropped around a foot since then.
     
  4. boatdriver

    boatdriver Refuge Member

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    It looks to me like it could be sago pondweed, Potamogeton pectinatus, or wigoen grass, Ruppia maritima. Sago will likely not grow in areas above a 4 ppt salinity, where as the wigeon grass has been seen in areas of upwards of 15 ppt salinities. Very different ranges. Wigeon grass seeds (fruits) will be individuals instead of a cluster of seeds (fruits) on the sago. Hope that helps. Either way, both good for canards!
     
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  5. DuxSausage

    DuxSausage New Member

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    Thanks for the help!

    Im not sure why it wouldn't be widgeon grass as ive not seen any other kind in the area but the brown color and some of it looks like it has broader leaves/stems threw me off.
     
  6. boatdriver

    boatdriver Refuge Member

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    It may be "brown" in color, but that is likely due to algal blooms and/ or sediment deposits. You should be able to pinch the grass slightly and "wipe off" the gunk as you run it through your fingers. Should be bright green in color after that. Meaning---alive and well!!
     
  7. Tomball Tiger

    Tomball Tiger New Member

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    Attached is a better close up of the grass. Hopefully the resolution is improved....
    I thought it might be algae, but not so sure about that.......Thanks for the input More SW La Duck Pond grass.jpg
     
  8. boatdriver

    boatdriver Refuge Member

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    Looking at this closer photo, it's real tough to say, but now I am leaning more toward Southern Naiad. How "fresh" is the marsh? If you are able to grab a sample, you will notice that the leaves are opposite one another for Naiad. The wigeon grass will have substantially longer leaves in relative to this plant. These leaves will be about 1/2" long. Wish I could get my hands on it to actually be 100% sure. Naiad usually grows in fresher zones, BUT it can still tolerate salinity up to 3.5 ppt.
     

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