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Discussion in 'Alabama Flyway Forum' started by oltcutdown, Apr 27, 2004.

  1. PintailAle

    PintailAle Elite Refuge Member

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    I am trying to understand. You are saying that the goose release could work just like the duck release but all you can say about the goose release is I know "enough"?? We have a resident goose season just like alot of the states but we didn't release any to get our resident popluation.
    I am not trying to bust your $@!!&. Believe it or not some people do like to learn. :confused: But we can't learn without having information on how it works. Was hoping since you "know enough" you could tell us some information on it. Where do they get the geese?? How are they raised?? Where are they raised?? How many at one time?? Where are they released?? Etc, etc....... Get the drift??

    PintailAle

    P.S. Thanks for telling me what triple BB's are. I have never seen one of those. I guess only big boys can see or shoot those. :rolleyes: :h
     
  2. markethunter

    markethunter Elite Refuge Member

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    Fact of the matter is you ain't never hear of it till now, which exposes you in the worst way.

    Man, give it up while you still have some dignity and head back on over to the NC forum :yes

    Your cooked over here.;)

    Probably 90% of the people on this forum have quit reading this. Let it die and you might not look like an idiot in front of everyone else.:tu
     
  3. CutTheDrake

    CutTheDrake Elite Refuge Member

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    :confused: :z
     
  4. markethunter

    markethunter Elite Refuge Member

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    I got bored and changed my mind.

    It's like he's a fox caught in a trap. He just won't chew through his foot that's caught and run off.:D

    I'm gonna let him drag this on till he has to change his screen name before anyone else give him the time of day.


    Not to get this started again but it makes for good reading..........


    Waterfowler.com
     
  5. PintailAle

    PintailAle Elite Refuge Member

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    OK MH. Let's recap what has happened here. There was a discussion thread about releasing waterfowl. I did a search to find a thread about it on the NC forum and ended up here. Added my two cents with all the research I had done over the past few years. You kinda disagreed but kinda didn't. Finally you admitted you agreed that releasing waterfowl from Frost was not a smart idea. Now you are changing your mind and say you think it is a great program and that I am some kind of fox in a trap. :l You have been asked two to three times to provide information on the goose release program since you think it is so much like the Mallard Release program while only providing "I know enough about it." I assure you they are not the same. Seems like a dead horse to me. I am good with assuming you are wishy washy about the Mallard Release program while I am completely against it after doing extensive research and having a Biology background. Also good with the fact that our state is doing something about the problem as Florida has already done. Yes we should have stopped when you said I agree with you but I am very hard headed just as you are. :l Mix two hard headed people and a long thread and it becomes impossible to stop. You can really have the last word because it is well past the point of being productive. Good luck to you. And I am not kidding when I say you are welcome to hunt with me in NC anytime. Will gladly take you to shoot some resident :l NC geese and some "wild":l Mallards.

    PintailAle
     
  6. markethunter

    markethunter Elite Refuge Member

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    The artice I made a link to in my last post shoots down every theory you've got. You should read it and put that in your memory bank.

    You still convinced me that the Frost Mallards used in the ways that they are currently used are not advantageous to the ultimate goal. Never said you didn't. There are obvious problems, like in Florida. That cannot be denied.

    Some good did come of this.

    It's just obvious you need to learn more, because Frost Mallards getting released and Duck Releases, and Goose Releases are all intertwined and are NOT mutually exclusive. You can't just pinpoint 1 area and agrue against it without getting into the other stuff. You gotta know about all of cause the argument is gonna swing like a kid back and forth across all these topics.

    Resident Geese got problems too.

    Ultimately it comes down to there are two many of them..............

    We ever get the populations up like some dang deer, I guess we'll have to start doing the early goose season limits and lengths by county.

    Sure would hate for that to happen.:dv
     
  7. Alabama Woody

    Alabama Woody Senior Refuge Member

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    Pintail Ail .....the geese were brought down from up north by a bunch of avid waterfowl hunters who asked and received the needed permits.......the geese have bred like rabbits and do not migrate other than to and from ponds, refuges, and local lakes.........often they visit cut fields in the fall........where we enjoy hunting them due to an early goose season to keep the populations in check. Pretty much that is about it....not to difficult.......Gary B. could add more probably if deemed needed...........YOU and MH can NOW free up some internet band width....because 4 or 5 pages of bull**** is a little much ........go fishing! I do respect your search for information on the matter but no need in stepping down to a lower level and bickering with a smart *** over and over and over and over. Good day. P.S. if your invite to hunt in your area stands....... I will take MH's place and come hunt with ya........of course we need to be able to hunt the "hot spots in your area" :)
     
  8. PintailAle

    PintailAle Elite Refuge Member

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    Statement of Ducks Unlimited, Inc regarding Disease-testing of Imported Waterfowl

    Submitted to the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission
    Waterfowl Committee

    May 13, 2004

    Prepared and Presented by Ross Melinchuk- Director of Public Policy Southern Regional Office- Ducks Unlimited, Inc.


    Mr. Chairman, Members of the Waterfowl Committee:

    Thank you for the invitation to appear before this Committee to offer Ducks Unlimited’s perspective on the subject of disease-testing of waterfowl imported to the State of North Carolina.

    Ducks Unlimited is a not-for-profit waterfowl and wetlands conservation organization headquartered in Memphis, Tennessee. The mission of Ducks Unlimited is to conserve, restore and manage wetlands and associated habitats for North America’s waterfowl. These habitats also benefit other wildlife and people. We have 640,000 members and over 1 million supporters representing every state in the United States, including approximately 18,000 members in North Carolina. We also have sister organizations in Canada and Mexico.

    I would like to preface my remarks by saying that I am neither a veterinarian nor a waterfowl disease specialist and for that reason I do not intend to delve into the epizootiology or zoonoses of waterfowl diseases. I leave those statements and opinions to others more qualified than I, some of who are present in the room today. Instead, I will focus my remarks on the potential implications of inappropriate or ill-advised public policy relative to waterfowl disease-testing protocols on the well-being of continental waterfowl populations.

    All three of the avian diseases under consideration today, as well as other diseases, have the potential to cause significant local, regional and continental declines in waterfowl populations should an outbreak occur and go undetected or uncontrolled for any length of time. History has demonstrated that waterfowl deaths in the hundreds of thousands are possible under certain environmental conditions. Some of these diseases also have the potential for transmission to other wildlife, domestic poultry or livestock and humans. For these reasons, a uniform, science-based disease-testing protocol is advisable for any importations of wild, domestic or semi-wild fish and wildlife into a state.

    In recent years, populations of many North American duck species reached 50-year highs, while others such as northern pintail and lesser scaup, hit all-time lows. Waterfowl habitually congregate in large numbers in relatively tight quarters during the spring, fall and winter months at traditional stopovers up and down the flyway. Ironically, the area immediately surrounding Corolla and the Outer Banks is one such area that has a strong and storied tradition of waterfowl use and hunting. It is at locations such as this that outbreaks of waterfowl disease can have catastrophic effects upon concentrations of waterfowl. Most waterfowl species are highly migratory, and many traverse the length of this continent twice annually as part of their life cycle. It is entirely possible for a duck to be in one state on Wednesday and in another state or Canadian province a thousand miles away on Saturday during the fall or spring migration period. It has been demonstrated through banding and radio-telemetry studies that ducks, geese and swans frequenting North Carolina travel through more than ½ the states, 9 Canadian provinces, Central and South America, the Caribbean, and Greenland. As a result, the environmental conditions, or in this case, the disease agents, these wild populations are exposed to in North Carolina have the potential to adversely affect other individuals, populations, species, or domestic poultry many miles away. The biological and public relations implications of an outbreak of avian influenza or Exotic Newcastle Disease in Arkansas or Ontario that is traceable to un-tested mallards released in North Carolina is ominous, potentially embarrassing, and may even have legal implications for a wildlife or agricultural agency.

    One need only read any of the newspaper headlines, legislative records or scientific journals regarding Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) or brucellosis to get a sense of what is possible should one of these epizootics occur among this nation’s wildlife and/or domestic livestock. Waterfowl diseases such as DVE and Avian Influenza (AI) have the potential to infect large numbers and a diversity of species of waterfowl and/or domestic poultry. Redheads, blue-winged teal and wood ducks are relatively more susceptible to DVE than are mallards, pintails or Canada geese; however, in the only major recorded outbreak of DVE in migratory waterfowl at Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge in South Dakota in 1973, more than 40,000 mallards and smaller numbers of Canada geese died. All confirmed outbreaks of the disease have involved commercial, avicultural, feral or captive-reared waterfowl. The fact that waterfowl exposed to DVE or AI can survive and exhibit no outward signs of the disease yet be responsible for disease outbreaks among other waterfowl or poultry under certain environmental conditions is of added concern. A disease-testing protocol applicable to any waterfowl proposed for importation from an avicultural facility or other source outside the state would alert officials to any potential source of the disease.

    Of additional concern to waterfowl managers in the Atlantic Flyway is possible hybridization between released mallards, whether disease-free or not, and American black ducks. Male mallards tend to be more aggressive and more frequently successful in pairing with female American black ducks in the northeastern U.S. and Canada. A similar concern exists for mottled ducks in Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission has banned the release of mallards in their state for this reason. There are numerous reports in literature from around the world where mallards have been released and subsequently paired and bred with native species. This has led to genetic swamping (technically referred to as genetic introgression), and in some cases, steep declines of native species. Genetic swamping occurs when the hybrid offspring are fertile and they ultimately cause the native species to be diluted or lost as a unique and distinct component of an area’s biodiversity. Examples of genetic introgression involving mallards include hybridization with American Black Ducks in northeastern North America, Australian Black Ducks in Australia, the Pacific Grey Duck in New Zealand and Australia, Koloa Duck in Hawaii, and the Mexican Duck in southwestern North America. In each of these cases, there are similarities in courtship behavior and females of the native species in question more often than not select the more aggressive male mallard during pair formation. It would be regrettable indeed if American black duck populations were further jeopardized within their range in Eastern North America as a result of something as preventable as the release of pen-reared mallards.

    Ducks Unlimited has spent the last 67 years doing all it can to protect, restore and enhance habitat for North America’s waterfowl. Most of our members are hunters who support waterfowl conservation through purchases of hunting licenses, permits and stamps, hunting equipment and other hunting-related expenditures. We support professional, responsible wildlife management as carried out by state and federal fish and wildlife agencies, other non-government organizations and landowners. It is the opinion of Ducks Unlimited that it would be counter to this philosophy and professionally irresponsible, for the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, or any other state fish and wildlife agency for that matter, to abandon their current policy of mandatory disease-testing of any waterfowl proposed for importation to the state for propagation, shooting or other non-consumptive purposes. We strongly encourage the Commission’s enforcement of existing laws relative to disease-testing and importation of waterfowl and applaud your efforts to establish a more definitive protocol in this regard. We support the Division of Wildlife Management staff recommendation as presented here today. The old adage “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” seems appropriate in the case of waterfowl disease testing!

    Thank you for the opportunity to appear before this Committee and present our perspective on this matter of continental importance to North American waterfowl. I have submitted a copy of my statement for the written record and will gladly entertain any questions, time permitting.

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    I'm not going to comment. Just wanted to provide the information to those interested.

    PintailAle
     
  9. oltcutdown

    oltcutdown Elite Refuge Member

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    Good info Pintail. No bs, just facts.
     
  10. PintailAle

    PintailAle Elite Refuge Member

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    Taken from North Carolin Wildlife Resources Commission :
    From the page above go to "Press Releases/What' New" near the bottom right. You will see the article listed there.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Wildlife Commission Requires Disease Testing for Captive-Reared Mallards
    RALEIGH, N.C. (May 21) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commissioners voted at their May 14 meeting to require disease testing of commercially raised waterfowl intended for release into the wild. Specific testing requirements will become part of the Commission’s rules during the 2004 regulations cycle and will, if given final approval by the Commission, become effective July 1, 2005.

    Breeders and importers of pen-raised mallards, and other domestically raised waterfowl to be released into the wild, must demonstrate that their flocks are free from avian influenza and exotic Newcastle disease before they can import or release birds in North Carolina.

    “Protection of wildlife resources is our primary mission,” said Dick Hamilton, deputy director of the wildlife commission. “These two diseases are highly contagious to waterfowl and could imperil our wild flocks. We want to take precautions to ensure the health of wild ducks and geese.”

    Only a portion of a domestically raised flock needs to be tested, according to flock size and other factors. Testing is a two-part process, starting with collection of blood samples from the test portion of the flock. If the blood samples are negative, the flock is given a clean bill of health. If samples from a flock are positive for avian influenza or exotic Newcastle disease, additional virus isolation tests must be conducted. No importation permit or propagation license will be issued until all virus isolation tests are negative for avian influenza and exotic Newcastle disease.

    The Commission also is concerned about duck virus enteritis. This disease is also highly contagious in waterfowl and can have a high mortality rate in both wild and penned flocks. Although the Commission does not require testing for duck virus enteritis at this time, biologists and other staff will continue to explore issues related to testing for this disease.

    Avian influenza is a viral infection of wild birds. The symptoms vary from a mild disease with little or no mortality to a highly fatal, rapidly spreading epidemic depending on the infecting virus strain, host factors and environmental stressors. Waterfowl act as a reservoir of avian influenza virus by carrying the virus in their intestinal tracts and shedding it in their feces. More avian influenza viruses have been isolated from ducks than any other species. Viruses that cause no obvious disease in waterfowl can quickly kill domestic poultry.

    Exotic Newcastle disease infects both domestic and wild birds. More than 250 species of birds are susceptible to exotic Newcastle disease virus, including mallards and other captive-reared game birds. Exotic Newcastle disease is highly infectious and contagious with its most dramatic impacts on poultry. Exotic Newcastle disease is so virulent that infected birds may die without showing symptoms and death rates of close to 100 percent may occur in infected poultry.
     

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