Targets going right to left vs left to right...

Discussion in 'Shooting - Reloading Forum' started by DtSB, Oct 6, 2017.

  1. Ravenanme

    Ravenanme Elite Refuge Member

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    That Double was a Dandy Pair , almost out of your right to left move ? By the way you setup ,as a leftie, you have a full range of motion to the right
    in your swing ( that shows , the movement in your swing of experience ) . I question the distance of your loads pattern with the loads you're shooting in
    this video ? The shot when it hits the birds seems to not have the energy upon impact , is it on the small side ,or is that Skt choke at the end of its ability ?
    I know what #1's and BB's do when they hit home .
     
  2. bang you'r dead

    bang you'r dead Canada Forum Mod. Eh! Moderator Flyway Manager

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    I have been shooting that choke for 3 seasons now. I do a quick "necroscopy" on the birds when I get home to take a lot at how I killed them, ie, head and neck pellets/holes vs chest vs gut shot vs wing shot. Most of my birds have 2-4 pellets in the chest area and some evidence of head/neck, especially with smaller shot (#3). With the #1 shot and BB, usually getting chest kills. We did lose a couple of birds this day, probably from making a shot a little too far away on going away birds. My fault for not getting on them a little quicker I guess. I miss them just like anybody else as well. Still have to get that pattern on the bird. Sometimes it takes 2 or even 3 shots for me, but that is the challenge of bird hunting.
     
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  3. Ravenanme

    Ravenanme Elite Refuge Member

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    Oh it's fun when you raise up and push the barrel through a bird flying and touch the trigger and ...wait a minute... nothing happened ! As you go into
    warp speed thinking , calm down , find the line , BBB.....see a little more gap and touch the trigger .....success ! What the heck was that all about , you ask
    yourself . Mechanics is a large part of successful wing shooting , oh yeah , we've all ,out of reaction been surprised by a bird sneaking in the back door and
    just waved the gun at it , and , smoked the sucker . BUT , when a freebee comes floating in or a flock decides to totally commit , you , had better revert to
    a good gun mount with keeping you cheek down tight along with a hard focus on the lead-edge of your intended target . A experienced waterfowler will
    have made a plan as to his second bird to shoot or even his 3rd bird if it's in range but make no mistake about it , he knows if his mechanics are up to par ,
    he can adjust if he doesn't have enough lead and has to double shoot a crippled bird before it hits the ground .
    These videos sure are fun to watch as , you can see , there's no rush to another bird but a nice smooth move to "fine the line" and "see the Gap" before the shot . The interesting part is , how Bang positions himself to take more Left to Right shots , which does show his experience !
     
  4. bang you'r dead

    bang you'r dead Canada Forum Mod. Eh! Moderator Flyway Manager

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    As a leftie, I think the left to right shots feel more natural and are easier, so you are correct. The most important fact in good wing shooting is the gun mount, which most people don't put enough emphasis on. Without a good mount, everything else is meaningless. I can remember a couple of years ago I had a flock of about 10 mallards come directly into the blocks, and I had my triple set up and I stood up and mounted and swung on the first bird. My jacket had bunched up a bit, and the gun didn't come as high as normal, and I had to bring my face down to the stock and it canted a bit. Pulled through the first bird, slapped the trigger and started moving up for the second....except the first didn't fall. Surprised, stopped my swing and went back to the first bird and panic shot as it flared and turned....second miss. Picked a third bird quartering away, and I am pretty sure I lifted my head off the stock and tried to reset my gun into the shoulder properly, but too late, and I missed the quartering shot away. I nearly tossed my gun into the lake. My hunting parter didn't miss a beat, leaned over at said "What happened....you have a stroke? " It took the edge off. There are always times you won't have a good gun mount and it becomes very easy to miss a bird. Good discipline and technique and practice can make it a lot easier.
     
  5. Ravenanme

    Ravenanme Elite Refuge Member

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    With nether of us trying to sound like "We know it all" , we do have some experience to share with others !
    Like what you're saying , about your stock hanging-up on your Jacket , a lot of BAD mounts of the gun come from the forward hand position on the forearm
    of the gun , as we raise the gun up to Port Arms for the ready to mount , the forward hand is to far forward to allow us to push the gun out away from our
    body giving more room for the stock to clear our clothes . By doing this , we are able to bring the comb of the stock up to our cheek and pull the gun back
    into the pocket of the shoulder making a solid Gun Mount , All the while with keeping a hard focus on the front of our intended target with our head firmly down
    on the stock . Our experience tell us to try and see where the hand needs to be each time we go hunting , that's why it's important to do a practice run of
    mounting the gun before the action begins , allowing us the muscle memory so it becomes a natural move and mount .
     
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  6. bang you'r dead

    bang you'r dead Canada Forum Mod. Eh! Moderator Flyway Manager

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    I also practice the gun mount in the blind/layout to make sure that the gun isn't going to hang up on anything, and that muscle memory takes over as it should. Some guys may look at my funny as I snap the gun up a few times in the blind during the hunt, but its a good place to get some practice in.
     
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  7. Billy Bob

    Billy Bob Elite Refuge Member

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    I do this every time I get back in my layout to be sure everything is just right for the next up. If I'm having an off day of shooting I will throw the gun up to my shoulder to check my mount several times before the next flock. I am a right handed shooter and always try to set my layout so I am facing 30-45 degrees to the right of the kill hole. I must admit that I am the odd duck because I am a right hand shooter that prefers left to right crossing shots and always try to set up for that shot.
     
  8. Ravenanme

    Ravenanme Elite Refuge Member

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    That's interesting , do you find yourself spot shooting those "right to left" birds ?
    Being right-handed myself I'll take the farthest bird , to the right , with a Spotshot/maintained lead that still allows me rotational movement in that
    direction with my hips . I try not to allow my swing to be ARM related as ( we all know ) this just pushes the stock away from the face !
     
  9. bang you'r dead

    bang you'r dead Canada Forum Mod. Eh! Moderator Flyway Manager

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    If we are in layouts, I am usually the guy on the far right (looking into the decoys). I normally angle my layout 30-45 degrees towards the centre, so that I can have easier shots from the centre and out to my right a full 180 degrees, and I usually cover that right side . One advantage of being a leftie.
     
  10. Ravenanme

    Ravenanme Elite Refuge Member

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    Bang , The Pull through method you use , from what I see in your video's , is a "fine the line" match the speed of the bird , then maintain a estimated gap
    between the bird and barrel before the shot , not necessarily a pull through method (am I seeing that right ?) . As a teenager (back in the day) I had the
    honor to hunt with a Real Waterfowler who was a true Pass-through shooter , this Old Fella was a legend in these parts as a shooter who seldom missed a
    bird in flight . I sat in the blind , next to him and watched him center-punch birds with the pattern as they were dead in the air upon the report . He in a
    smooth move (not in a hurry) would raise up in one motion , snap the Mod 12 to his cheek and find the line of flight of the bird with the barrel , never
    stopping , but go right through its path and pull the trigger as the barrel passed the bird , continuing a very pronounced follow through . On many hunts
    I had with him , he would shoot his limit with (maybe) one or two shells more than his limit of birds . He only would shoot one bird out of a bunch , one
    shot , one dead bird , unless he didn't feel the bird was dead in the air , at that with lightning speed , he would pump that Mod 12 and shoot the bird
    again as it was dropping and it hadn't dropped very far with a puff of feathers before the second shot rang out , killing it ! He told me he was very content ,
    if he did everything right with his shooting mechanics , in making one good shot each and every time !
     

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