The Basics

Discussion in 'Photography Forum' started by Wack, Jun 14, 2007.

  1. Wack

    Wack Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,431
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2000
    Location:
    Wackadonia, Arkansas
    COMPOSITION continued...

    Perspective - One last note:


    If you want to improve pictures of your children 100%...don't shoot pictures like a looming giant from above.

    It's as simple as getting down to their eye level with the camera. (And on this one, note again....'fill the frame')

    Here's a pic of my granddaughter....purty aint she?

    [​IMG]

    This is a great rule to adopt in your waterfowl and wildlife photos, too:

    [​IMG]
     
  2. GooseBustr

    GooseBustr Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    293
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2002
    Location:
    Ragalfart, IN
    Neat ideas, nicely done, thanks
     
  3. cmelik10

    cmelik10 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,473
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2005
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Wack,

    Thank you, thank you, thank you. I was just thinking the other day that a thread like this would be so helpful to me and other newbies to the DSLR camera area. I can't wait till I have some time to really sit down and study what you have written, thanks again.

    Scott
     
  4. Lame-Duck

    Lame-Duck Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    26,595
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2001
    Location:
    Central San Joaquin Valley, California
    Wack.....Great presentation. :clap :clap This post is really informative. Thanks for taking the time to put it together for all of us.
     
  5. Dizzy Duck

    Dizzy Duck Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    10,338
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2000
    Location:
    Gettysburg, Pa and Southern MD
    Nice Job James! I'd like to see this as a sticky and we could start one on PS and Elements as well. It would be nice to see this kept going so it doesn't get buried.

    I'd like to see the moderators make decisions as to which post would become stickies to not get lost, especially the ones we put hours of effort into. Possibly hold them for a month or so so every one could see them. I am adding to my MAAM post and will link back to the original and it will be on my website too. But a post like this is very helpful to the beginners who ask the same questions over and over. As professionals and advanced amatures we don't mind answering these but it would give the NewBies a nice starting point and help them understand some of the things they will read on here.
     
  6. Blue Moon

    Blue Moon Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    937
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2007
    Location:
    Republic of Texas
    Wack - Extremely well done. When I visit this forum I always have the feeling that I'm in the presence of greatness.

    Thanks for taking the time to share your knowledge. The content you and others add to this site always leads me to daydream that I'm in my favorite hunting lodge, hanging out with kindred spirits after a day afield, reading a classic or admiring a trophy in front of the warmth of the fire.

    Well done,

    Blue Moon
     
  7. Wack

    Wack Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,431
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2000
    Location:
    Wackadonia, Arkansas
    Thanks everybody for the kinds words. I'll keep adding to this as I have time. :tu

    Lets start taking control of the camera now:

    We started with the elements that make up exposure;
    * ISO
    * Shutter speed
    * Aperture
    .....

    Now we have to go deeper for a better understanding of how those three work together, and the influences they have on our photos.

    The first step is to settle on a MODE setting on the cameras selection wheel.

    These will appears as A, P, TV, AV, M....and several preset modes that I won't discuss, because they are basically point and shoot functions. (Sports, landscape, night, portrait, etc). These are designated by icons.

    Most pro and advanced photographers are very familiar with the more advanced MODES, and may use several depending on the desired effect and available light.

    So what is the function, or priority of these MODES?

    A - Auto: Pretty much what it says. The camera does it all...you just point and shoot.

    P - Program Mode: Even professionals will often switch to program mode so they can concentrate on getting the shot instead of worrying over exposure calculations.
    Unlike full auto mode, you can usually control flash and a few other VERY important camera settings. One of the most important being EXPOSURE COMPENSATION. (More on this later).

    AV - Aperture Priority: Photographer sets the aperture (f-stop) and the camera will couple that setting with a shutter speed to deliver a good exposure.

    TV - Shutter Priority: Photographer sets the shutter speed, and the camera will attempt to deliver a good exposure by selecting the appropriate aperture setting.

    I should mention...you choose the ISO setting in the P, AV, and TV modes.
     
  8. Fooshman

    Fooshman Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,384
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2006
    Location:
    Black Dog, Texas
  9. GUNDOG944

    GUNDOG944 Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    216
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2005
    Location:
    Florida
    Thank you Wack for the GREAT information, as someone new to photography this is the best info anyone could get for free. Please make this a sticky for future reference.
     
  10. Wack

    Wack Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,431
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2000
    Location:
    Wackadonia, Arkansas
    Taking control of the camera Part I:

    Were past some basics now, so lets delve into how and why we make certain decisions, and how you can begin to get the most out of your digital SLR, by making manual adjustments and choices.


    Choosing an ISO setting:

    This is one of the first things you should consider everytime you prepare to take a series of photographs. Evaluate the scene and determine the light conditions and the nature of the shot:

    Light - Is the subject well lit?
    Tripod - Am I use a tripod?
    Moving Subject - Is my subject moving or stationary?

    Always keeping in mind our original ISO discussion:

    * Lower ISO's will slow down your shutter speed, but give you better quality

    * Higher ISO's will allow you to shoot higher shutter speeds, but produce noise

    So knowing these things, choose the lowest ISO setting that will allow you to reasonably work with the given light.



    Along with the available light, you must consider the kind of shot you're taking, and determine if you need faster shutter speeds, or can you get away with slower shutter speeds. (Tripod photos, etc)

    The optimum choice is a low ISO setting at all times for better quality photos, but unfortunately we don't always have enough light.

    Summary -

    * You must always remember how ISO effects shutter speeds.
    * Lower light conditions usually call for higher ISO settings
    * Brighter scenes or a solid camera rest, will allow lower ISO settings that produce higher quality images.

    www.outdoorshooter.org
     

Share This Page