Too late for dove fields?

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by BobGlover, Jul 1, 2007.

  1. MALLARD MAGICIAN

    MALLARD MAGICIAN Elite Refuge Member

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    grnhd, IF you disked up the 4 acres behind your house and sowed in with a appropriate rates for wildlife food plot purposes....that is legal, and can be hunted.

    Guys there is a WIDE window allowed by the USF&WS when it comes to this issue, but there are limits & regulations you have to follow...typed out in black and white. IF you can't read that stuff and figure it out for yourself....it is better you stay safe rather the sorry.

    What I have mentioned has been done TIME & TIME again, check by wardens TIME & TIME again, and as long as you don't get stupid and sow 5-6bu/ac or sow it 2 or 3 times....you will not be ticketed for it IN ARKANSAS because it IS a normal ag. practice for the area....such may NOT be in your area that is for you to know.
     
  2. drewsmith

    drewsmith Elite Refuge Member

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    MM

    Your link is an interpretive bulliten put out by the USFWS and attempts to make the actual regs more clear. It does anything but it's intended purpose. There are so many contradictions, I lost count.

    I really would not make statements that you are absolutely sure it is legal, when there are others on this same thread that are stating that it is not. I have been told directly by federal enforcement officers that I would be ticketed if I attempted to top sow wheat unless it was PERFECT. I plant lots of fields every year for dove hunting. I seriously doubt anymore than a handful of those reading these post actually have the proper equipment to plant wheat in a manner consistant with normal ag purposes or soil stabilization practices. In order for a wheat seed to have a chance to grow, the ground must be worked for a proper seed bed. This usually requires a disk and a rolling basket or packer, harrow, etc. Every year guys run out a week before with a spinner and throw out wheat seed in a mowed field and get busted. Or leave some on the lane, or put some on unworked ground, or spill some in the field.....the list of ways to screw this up is very long.

    I would proceed with great caution when pushing the edge of the envelope.
     
  3. raccoon bandit

    raccoon bandit Senior Refuge Member

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    State Game Commision plants wheat on public hunting grounds every year in mid August around here. (Pennsylvania) That being said, I think buckwheat could be planted and harvested still. Farmers used to plant some buck wheat around here when they could not get in the fields early for some reason. It is not a common crop anymore in these parts, and it may not work you, but might worth asking about. It is hard on the soil.
     
  4. raccoon bandit

    raccoon bandit Senior Refuge Member

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    Gave it some thought... for a change. Buckwheat is a least 75 days, it was/is planted late, as a crop, maybe, but September 1st right around the corner. You probably already knew that...
     
  5. PaulinKansas

    PaulinKansas Elite Refuge Member

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    I usually plant my wild oats at least 6 inches deep. Nothing has ever germinated, sprouted, and come out. What am I doing wrong? Or should I continue with my same practice. I suspect the ground might not be fertile.
     
  6. olduckhunter

    olduckhunter Elite Refuge Member

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    paul, it's simple. you've either had a vasectomy or you've prayed a lot.



    old
     
  7. MALLARD MAGICIAN

    MALLARD MAGICIAN Elite Refuge Member

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    I NEVER once told ANYONE to try any of the above or suggested it would be ok to do so.....NONE of what you listed in a normal ag. practice and if done WOULD get you busted.
    Following normal ag. practices with top sown wheat will NOT get you busted, IF done right....and right is not that hard to achieve.
     
  8. cancan

    cancan Elite Refuge Member

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    here is direct quote from a very very good local game warden that knows his stuff.....


    "Yes this would be considered a baited area if hunted. 10 years ago or so it was stopped here in matyland. They are correct that the AG office does recognize that it is a bonafide practice and time frame. However, the USFWS does not recognize it as a legal practice for hunting. "Any broadcast grain, seed etc... shall be incorperated into the soil". To broadcast say wheat on top of the ground, and not disc it down or cultipack it would constitute bait."
     
  9. knees

    knees Elite Refuge Member

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    Guys this is not rocket science................technically it is baiting! End of story! But it is also technically legal--in that part of AR. Like MM, Old & da fowl said, it's up to the local extension office to determine if it's an accepted farming practice! Don't read any more into it than that--the feds can't! We used to own over 2000 acres in NE AR (Randolph County), and straight from our local extension agent......"I top sew wheat for 'winter pastures' every year in the middle of August"!!!!! So guess what our dove fields looked like every year!? It's an acceptable ag practice in that part of the state. Please don't be giving quotes from other states and their game wardens, as those states, and further more individual counties within a particular state, might have different ag practices.:tu

    Do yourself a favor and call your local extension agent. Of course you could have one like I've got now in central MO, and he's not willing to say what is or isn't an acceptable practice for fear of "liability"!!!! :mad: :z What a crock of sh!t!
     
  10. olduckhunter

    olduckhunter Elite Refuge Member

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    knees, even after you posting what you did some yah hoo is going to come on here from mich, or some other yankee state and say it's not legal in the states you listed. i don't think they understand what a "normal farm practice" means. either that or they are jealous because they can't do it.



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