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Too Many Snows?

Discussion in 'Snow Goose Hunting Forum' started by CSUguy, Jul 16, 2017.

  1. 870

    870 Senior Refuge Member

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    Waterfowl Heaven Alberta Canada
    Interesting,,, we always wanted to be in the front of the line,,, but when you put in that light, that makes sense. May have to try the end of the line this fall!!!
     
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  2. 870

    870 Senior Refuge Member

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    Waterfowl Heaven Alberta Canada
    Wind certainly seems to deal maker / breaker for most shoots doesn't it?
     
  3. Den and Jack

    Den and Jack Senior Refuge Member

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    Weather seems to matter the most when you are close to several feeds. Last feed field can be better than field right off huge roost in average weather. Heavy wind or fog it can be nice to be closer to roost.

    Hunting pressure which seems to impact feeding flights is one of the biggest factors IMO. Lot of pressure and birds fly in very large flocks. Less pressure and geese seem to spread out a little and fly in smaller flocks.

    So many factors to a good week of hunting snows. Makes it so sweet when it all comes together.
     
  4. CSUguy

    CSUguy Senior Refuge Member

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    Loveland, CO
    Another variable that seems to be under appreciated is the time of day. Over the past few seasons I've heard about more and more afternoon only snows goose hunts. That's when we've historically hunted ducks and scouted. Occasionally we will spend a full day in the same field for snows if they continue trickling in. But I can't recall an afternoon where we've setup the full rig of snows. The size of the flocks seem just as large in the morning and afternoon. Maybe I'm wrong on flock size or number of flocks.
     
  5. 870

    870 Senior Refuge Member

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    Call us lazy,,, but we hunt snows mostly in the afternoon now,,, as it is so much easier to set everything out in broad daylight. The other side to this decision to concentrate on afternoon shoots is in our neck of the woods, mornings are often are bright,,,, frosty or dewey,,, and dead calm,,, not exactly the kind of conditions conducive to decoying geese. By the afternoon, daytime, there is usually a bit of wind with no frost or dew to deal with ,,, and if we are lucky, perhaps some cloud cover to make the birds fly earlier and longer. Under the right conditions, afternoon shoots can be epic.

    Often times we will leave everything out over night and hunt the spread the following morning as well with varying degrees of success.

    However weather is still the dominant factor and, the downside to afternoons in bluebird conditions, is the afternoon flight can be late and compressed and even lazy if the weather is too nice,,, or,,,, the birds never leave the field period cuz of lousy weather!!!

    As Den said in his post " So many factors to a good week of hunting snows. Makes it so sweet when it all comes together"
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2017
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  6. thatguy2

    thatguy2 Senior Refuge Member

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    Small Town USA
    Buddy of mine is very successful, and he is also very wind specific. He will watch a feed for a few days waiting on the right wind. He wants is so when they approach the spread the sun is in their eyes, and a speed of 10 mph minimum. He has some pretty good hunts in the fall after folks in Canada and the northern centra flyway have been gunning them for a couple months.
     
  7. COHonkers

    COHonkers Refuge Member

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    Location:
    Colorado
    Wind, wind, and more wind! In my experience these birds are tough to hunt period, but with no wind they become REALLY tough. Yea you can still shoot birds on little to no wind days but it's hard. You can work your butt off scouting, finding the perfect field, getting a perfect hide, and perfect setup but at the end of the day I think you still need a little luck from mother nature.....wind.

    Like others have said, that's why it is so awesome when it does come together just right!
     
  8. CSUguy

    CSUguy Senior Refuge Member

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    Loveland, CO
    Do any of you focus more on Ross geese? My experience with them in Colorado has been much better than the snows. In SK in the fall the Ross seem to decoy better too.

    One other massive key to success is finding the juvies, both Ross and Snows. It seems like the massive flocks we've hunted in SK eliminate the juvie benefit. When there are that many geese the juvies rarely peel off. Occasionally the adults will even swoop down below the juvies and pull them back up to the flock.
     
  9. KID CREOLE

    KID CREOLE Elite Refuge Member

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    San Pedro, Ca.
    We do not like wind, only a breeze to line up the birds.
    We typically dont target the Rossies, I prefer to let them fly around the spread and help encorage the adult snows to come in Sk

    Because of the high amount of Rossies that are banded in the Pacific flyway we kill them all in California
     
  10. Den and Jack

    Den and Jack Senior Refuge Member

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    Do you use full bodies? Is a breeze 7-10mph? Wind 10+, I know less than 5 mph is not best even if socks have supports.
     
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