Transporting Layout Blinds

Discussion in 'Goose Hunting Forum' started by StrmChzr, Jul 18, 2004.

  1. StrmChzr

    StrmChzr Senior Refuge Member

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    hazzard co. kansas
    I'm planning to purchase a layout blind to goose hunt out of this fall. My F-150 SuperCrew (4-door) truck doesn't have a lot of room in the bed (all 1/2 ton S.C.'s bed's are actually shorter than a traditional short-bed) especially when you add 100+ goose dekes!
    My buddy's going to build me a trailer which will be used to transport my 4-wheeler and then once at the field will be pulled by my 4-wheeler to the spot in the field to hunt. Trailer will resemble a "golf cart" trailer which needs to be as light weight as possible so that I can pull it out in muddy winter wheat fields to drop off dekes, layouts, gear, etc.
    Ideally, the trailer would be capable of hauling my Honda 300 and 2 (maybe even 3 or 4) layouts to the field. I prefer to transport my goose dekes in the bed of my truck, but once "on location" I want to be able to only make one trip out in the field to minimize the impact to the field (and also I'M LAZY).
    :yes
    I haven't decided what layout to buy (Final Approach, Avery, or Shelter Pro) --- plan on trying 'em out at KC Cabela's in August.
    Does anyone utilize a trailer for the same thing? If so, what's it look like, dimensions, etc......:z
    How do ya'll transport 3 or more layouts plus dekes, gear, and mutt?
     
  2. full choke

    full choke Senior Refuge Member

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  3. mrdux

    mrdux Elite Refuge Member

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    A couple of things I noticed about your scenerio that will probably cause you lots of grief. You are wanting a road-worthy trailer that can also be pulled, loaded down, thru muddy fields with a 300 cc ATV? I can't see it happening. Any ATV trailer that will be used in mud MUST have flotation type tires, like the ATV tires, or you will be buried up to the axle and the 300 will be useless pulling it out. Been there-done that!! The ATV type tires aren't road-worthy on the trailer.

    Also, the only way I can see you getting that amount of gear thru muddy fields is making several trips, then you risk tearing up the farmers' fields. Why not consider buying Destroyer blinds from GooseView? They can be loaded with a lot of gear, decoys, etc. and hooked behind the ATV--train-style--and pulled to your hunt location. They have poly sled bottoms that also keep you dry in muddy conditions.

    I notice you mentioned "minimizing the impact" on the field. Far too much land is being posted by landowners who have seen the impact on their lands by folks who could care less--mainly hunters. We should all try to minimize the impact but it has to be in reality, not words. Pulling any rig into a farmer's muddy winter wheat field is asking for trouble. I would stay on the turn rows or stay out of the field with the ATV until the fields are frozen and will bear the weight of the traffic.

    My $.02 but an educated $.02. I've talked to way too many landowners who have had fields torn up. It's pretty hard to convince that person that there are people who will treat their property better than the last guy.
     
  4. salthunter

    salthunter Moderator Moderator

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    Dont upset your farmers!! Mrdux has it right.
    I could carry 2 dozen foots in bags on my 300 sportsman. Just make few trips
     
  5. StrmChzr

    StrmChzr Senior Refuge Member

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    hazzard co. kansas
    You guys are absolutely right. Let me try this again:

    The farmer (incidentally a good buddy of mine) certainly would not appreciate me 'ruttin up his field, not to mention having to pull my dumb*** out if I did get stuck. I wouldn't drive my 4-wheeler through a muddy wheat field, period (if it's dry-yes, winter wheat will not be harmed if the ground is bone dry or frozen solid).
    Lazy, I may be, but stupid (well, I'll leave well enough alone!)

    Fortunately the fields I hunt are reasonably small (<80 acres) and have pastures bordering them that I was able to drive through in my truck in a downpour last season to "kick" out all my huntin' crap and then drive back to the gate (which I ALWAYS close). FYI-the only thing that'll end hunting priveleges (sp?) faster than tearing up a field is letting a farmers cattle get out ---inexcusable!

    If there is any question about the "muddiness" of a field, I'll pull the trailer along the fencerow and throw the dekes over the fence and hoof it the rest of the way. I still want to only make one trip, though---I hate being rushed setting up dekes and its well over an hour to get from my place to the honey hole.

    One more thing and I'll shut up---- I'm extremely fortunate to live in the Sunflower state where ALL the land still hasn't been leased (plus there's plenty of public and walk-in hunting available to the average joe). Ten years ago, a high school kid (me) could politely knock on a farmer's door and more often then not secure hunting priv. for the next day. Still possible, but I can foresee a day when it won't be so. I try to be respectful to the landowner regardless of if he says yea or nea.


    Gun ownership and hunting (harvesting the excess critters) is our right, private land access is a PRIVELEGE!
    Happy trails, boys!:tu
     
  6. mrdux

    mrdux Elite Refuge Member

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    c-van2, thanks for understanding my reply and not going off on me for being a smart azz! I have very rarely been denied permission to hunt, even taking clients onto private property. I'm always up front with the landowners and try to live by the motto "All we leave in your field is feathers and footprints". I even go as far as policing my spread area after a hunt and even pick up wads if we see them.

    In the area I hunt, I have seen more and more disregard for landowners and their property. Much of it is our younger generation who feel if they can't shoot snows out of the truck, it's too much work.

    It sound like you are in on a good situation and I hope it continues to work out for you.
     

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