Tuning a Broadhead

Discussion in 'Bow Hunting Forum' started by wingmastr23, Oct 12, 2010.

  1. wingmastr23

    wingmastr23 Elite Refuge Member

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    Ok....Here is the jest of it.

    (Assumptions - you can shoot/group arrows decently - and the shots you shoot during this exercise are "good" shots)

    The goal here is to get your broadheads to fly like your field points.

    1. Shoot your field point. This shot "should" be center "x" if you have been shooting/sighting your bow.

    2. Shoot your broadhead of choice. After determining that they fly differently you must adjust your REST.

    You adjust your rest the SAME way you want the broadhead to fly. Example - if your broadhead hits high and right of the field point - then you want to lower your rest and move your rest to the left. (These should be micro adjustments....1/16th or so)

    3. Once you do this - shoot another FIELD POINT. (Yes, it will NOT be on the center of "x" any more. I will cover this later)

    4. Shoot the broadhead again. If you have moved your rest correctly, these two arrows should be CLOSER to each other than they were the first time. If it isn't, then you didn't move it the right way.

    5. Continue this process until your broadhead and field points shoot the same.

    6. LAST STEP - Once your field points and broadheads are shooting the same adjust your SIGHT to get back to the center of "x". Remember when sighting in your pins, you move them the same direction you are off....Example - if you shoot an arrow left of "x" then you should move your site cage LEFT. If you shoot an arrow high of "x" then you move your site cage UP. And Visa-Versa.

    (Center of "x" also = Bullseye)

    If you walk back (20yds,30yds,40yds, etc) you might have to keep adjusting your REST. Sometimes your broadhead won't show a difference till getting past 30yds.....this means you must make a minor adjustment to your REST as described above.

    Hope this helps someone!:tu
     
  2. RETRO

    RETRO Elite Refuge Member

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    After paper tuning a bow, most of the time your fixed heads won't impact exactly the same as your field points. A lot of people will automatically blame the broadhead for this. Here's some info on broadhead or "micro" tuning your bow so they will.

    One of the most important things when it comes to broadhead tuning a bow is to make sure your fixed heads are aligned perfectly to your arrow shaft. If they wobble any, they won't fly right. The best thing to do when you build up your arrows is screw your fixed heads into your inserts before gluing them into your shaft. If you're shooting carbons, do not use Goat Tuff or any other fast setting adhesive. The best thing to use is PowerBond. It takes about 6 hours to cure and is heat reversible. If you don't use PowerBond, use a 24hr. epoxy. The fast setting epoxy is too brittle.

    The reason you use a slow setting adhesive is so when you install the insert, with the broadhead attached, you can spin it to see if it's aligned properly. If it wobbles, turn the insert in the shaft a couple of times. Nine times out of ten this will correct the wobble because you have a little too much adhesive on one side and spinning the insert smoothes it out. If this doesn't stop the wobble, remove the insert and attach your head to another and try it again. If it still wobbles, try it in another shaft. If this doesn't cure it, you've got a bad broadhead.

    If your inserts are already glued in, you'll have to keep mixing and matching heads and arrows till you get as many spinning true as you can. If they won't align, the insert in your arrow is more than likely the culprit if you're using a good quality broadhead.

    A very important tool to have is something to spin check your arrows on. You can purchase a "store bought" one or build one out of any box like the one shown below.



    To broadhead tune your bow to get a fixed head to fly with your field points you have to tweak on your rest and/or your nock point. Shoot two field point tipped arrows at 20 or 25 yards. Then shoot two braodhead tipped arrows at the same distance. If the broadheads impact both vertically and horizontally than your field points, work on the vertical first. This is the easiest.

    If your broadheads hit higher than the field points your nock point is too low. Either raise the nock point OR lower your rest. When micro tuning make small adjustments, say 1/16". Shoot another 4 arrow group and keep making 1/16" adjustments till the broadheads hit level with the field points.



    If your broadheads hit lower than your field points your nock point is too high. Either lower your nock point OR raise your rest.



    The tricky part is getting the horizontal difference out. This has to do with your shaft spine. This is for right handed shooters. If you're a lefty, do the opposite. If your broadheads hit to the right of your field points, your spine is too weak. Move your arrow rest to the left, away from the bow in 1/16" adjustments till they hit with your field points.



    If your broadheads are hitting to the left of your field points, your spine is too stiff. This is more common. Move your arrow rest to the right, towards the bow.



    Other ways of correcting spine is to add or decrease your draw weight. If you're too weak, decrease the draw weight If you're too stiff, add draw weight. You can also adjust the spring tension on your rest, if your rest has a spring. Decrease spring tension if your spine is too stiff and increase it if your spine is weak. If you bow was properly paper tuned, you shouldn't have to make any adjustments to the draw weight or spring tension.

    Pictured below is an example of the nock point and spine being off.



    First off you would either lower your nock point OR raise your rest. Once you hit level with the field point, either move your arrow rest to the left, decrease draw weight or increase spring tension on your rest to correct the spine.

    One important note: Any adjustment you make to the rest will affect where your field tips impact also. So you may find it neccessary to adjust your sight to stay on the target. With each adjustment the broadhead tipped arrow should move more than the field tipped arrow. Once you have them impacting the same, re-zero your sight.

    It takes a little time and patience, but it can be done. Just remember to make small adjustments each time and concentrate on good form when you shoot your groups. If you get tired, take a break or put the bow up and try again some other time. Once you get your field points and broadheads flying together, your bow will be tuned perfect to that particular arrow set up. If you change heads or shafts, you'll more than likely have to micro tune again.
     
  3. Duckologist

    Duckologist Elite Refuge Member

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    Good explanation. It will probably help some folks who are new at bow tuning.
     
  4. Clark

    Clark Elite Refuge Member

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    I shoot expandables because I'm not confident tuning a broadhead.

    Just out of curiosity, how much difference is there between the point of impact on field points versus broadheads - at say 20, 30 or 40 yards?

    Thanks,
    Clark
     
  5. flatsspy

    flatsspy Senior Refuge Member

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    None for me my bow shoots Slick Trick magnum BH's in the same hole as my field points.
     
  6. Duckologist

    Duckologist Elite Refuge Member

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    There should be none if your bow is tuned properly. Before you even get to broadhead tuning you should paper tune and walk back tune your bow. Then you can start broadhead tuning.
     
  7. mudhen

    mudhen Elite Refuge Member

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    My 100 gr Shuttle T-Locks shoot exactly the same as field tips for me with my Hoyt AM32. From 10-60, they shoot the same :)

    mudhen
     
  8. wingmastr23

    wingmastr23 Elite Refuge Member

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    Then your bow must be tuned pretty well.......

    A properly tuned bow will shoot field tips and MOST broadheads the same.....If a broadhead flies differently than a field tip - your bow is out of tune...
     
  9. wingmastr23

    wingmastr23 Elite Refuge Member

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    Bump for a friend....
     

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