Tunnel Hull with Prop vs Flat Bottom with Mud Motor

Discussion in 'California Flyway Forum' started by LeakyW8ers, Feb 8, 2018.

  1. Big Daddy Gaddy

    Big Daddy Gaddy Elite Refuge Member

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    A few years ago (more than a few now) there were some forum members rescued via helicopter. Could’ve been bad...now it’s just a good story.
     
  2. EL GURU

    EL GURU Senior Refuge Member

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    I won't lie... my boats been pulled out a time or two from those neck of the woods.... looking back now a helicopter ride is a story and a half. Not saying I'm jealous but it sounds like a hell of a day.., I remember years back on the main breach a guy got turned sideways as the water was flowing into the island. The look of fear on one guys face I'll never forget. Word was he was paralyzed..., "the car wreck didn't get him but the boat was"... many moons back
     
  3. EL GURU

    EL GURU Senior Refuge Member

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    I'm surprised no ones died out there :dv
     
  4. Powder

    Powder Elite Refuge Member

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    Image.png Image 2.png Image 5.png I have a bit of history with both both boat type and motor units. Owned MM (1851 and 5500MB) and tunnel hull (1650 and 40hp) setup at the same time. My tunnel was a dream to drive, but wasn’t as versatile as the mud boat. Both were open and had removable rigid flame blinds. In my opinion outboards are more fragile than mud motors.
     
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  5. On_a_string

    On_a_string Senior Refuge Member

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    I've had both and hunt the bay regularly. The problem with the bay mud is that it doesn't refill the hole you make. You watch those Louisiana videos and go up to Tule Lake and you'll see the mud refill the hole you made with the prop and eventually give you forward motion. When you make a hole in bay mud you have just that, a hole with mud not refilling it quickly enough to provide push. Having said that, once you have forward motion you can go across any stretch of low tide mud. Just don't stop. haha
     
  6. 7pntail

    7pntail Senior Refuge Member

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    Good thread. I don't have the answer. I have run many boats, and an outboard is by far the most comfortable to drive. I am currently running an 18 foot flat bottom with a mud buddy. It is slow, and a bit of work to drive, especially on long runs.

    Having said that, every time I whack into something at o dark, I'm glad I have it. Have a couple of friends that have gone through a lower unit or two.
     
  7. Canyoncrosser

    Canyoncrosser Senior Refuge Member

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    Chris, take a picture of my favorite hunting partners house for me for old time sake. I always was happy when I pulled up there...
    hris
     
  8. bucksducks

    bucksducks Senior Refuge Member

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    Mud motors and tunnels aren't a great fit, kind of defeats the purpose of the mud motor. We welded a plate over the tunnel and got better performance
     
  9. HaydenHunter

    HaydenHunter Elite Refuge Member

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    As long as the mud does not have sand in it you will not chew up mud motor props. Add sand and you will grind down a prop fast.

    Mud motors are the most versatile type for going through the weeds, moss and scum that can clog up a jet.

    I have either owned or rigged for others many mud motor boats. Long and skinny boats will run the fastest but we are talking incrementally...1-2 mph at best. Most mud motor boats are now in the 52-60" wide range. Hopped up mud motors that start at a stock 35-36 hp and are modified to 40-60+ hp will make even the biggest boats move. I run a heavy, 1/8" thick 1852 with my lightly modified ProDrive and get 18-24 under heavy hunting load depending on conditions. I have a buddy with a highly modified Mudbuddy on a 1/8" thick 1860 who gets mid-high 20s with heavy hunting load.

    We run in mud, heavy weeds, ice (I realize you guys don't have to contend with that) and through soft bottoms as well as navigating through gravel bar rivers. We run across big water which can sometimes get quite "sporty". We constantly bump into submerged logs in some of the bays we hunt, as winter pool level up here can drop a lake by as much as 7-11'.

    There are days where I pine for a big outboard and days where a jet would get me up a shallow river the fastest. But with all the crap we contend with (weeds, shallows, debris and ice) the mud motor has proven itself the most versatile and will get me anywhere I need to go, albeit not in the fastest manner. That said, runs of 8-10+ river or lake miles are not uncommon for us, and at the speeds I've listed above, are quite do-able. I can go anywhere I need to go in my mud boat.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2018
  10. dwhauss

    dwhauss Senior Refuge Member

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    Lots of good info here, and all spot on. I can go across just about any stretch of mud with mud motor, just can't stop or turn sharp. Loose speed and its all over but the pushing.
    What I can't believe I got by without for decades was a push pole. Hunted the bay since 74 semi v hull and outboard, never owned one of these. Picked up a small mud boat and got a push pole,,,,,, what the hell was I thinking before that???
    Reality on the bay is, knowledge of tides and weather is crucial. Fail either of those and you'll pay one way or the other.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2018

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