Underground Wood Goose Pit

Discussion in 'Goose Hunting Forum' started by JReid, Jan 14, 2019.

  1. JReid

    JReid New Member

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    Wanted to bounce this off the forum. I'm new to the forum as of 5 minutes ago and look forward to learning how to better my goose hunting from others experiences on here. I'm looking at building a new pit on my farm in SO IL and I'm considering going all wood. Going to be using a very sturdy frame structure as well as sealing up all walls on the outside of it before backfilling. Does anyone on here hunt out of an all wood underground pit? Success's/Failures that may be helpful in my plans? Thanks in advance! BTW, looking at 12' long 6' wide and 6' deep as my dimensions.
     
  2. JReid

    JReid New Member

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    Forgot to mention. The field is relatively flat but this will be placed on a bit of a crown and the soil I have has a lot of clay in it.
     
  3. likesbigspreads

    likesbigspreads Elite Refuge Member

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    Treated 3/4" plywood walls and 2x4 on 12" center or 2x6 on 18" center for framing.
     
  4. JReid

    JReid New Member

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    Yep, was planning on 3/4" for shell and using 4"X4" studs on 2' centers for the joists.
     
  5. Wareagle1

    Wareagle1 Elite Refuge Member

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    We use drop lids, can’t see well but conceals we’ll. Also 6’ deep is probably way to deep unless your all 7’ plus shooters.
     
  6. Waterdog Trainer

    Waterdog Trainer Senior Refuge Member

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    Built and hunt out of many. 12ft. is not very long. The minimum we go is 16ft. Not sure how many guys you are planning on hunting at one time but by the time you get coats, bags, gun cases, heaters, etc. they will take up more room than you realize. I have several 6ft. wide which aren't too bad but I have one that is 8ft.x 16ft. which is much better for several reasons. The added width allows you to have a full length bench which is nicely tucked under the roof which gets you out of the elements better. Wider and longer allows for more decoy storage if you plan on keeping decoys in the pit. Extra head room is a definite plus. You don't want to be so shallow it kills your back and you're banging your head on the ceiling. Six deep is fine with a step up. If you go 6ft. deep use 2x6s. Remember, you only want to build it one time.
     
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  7. JReid

    JReid New Member

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    Thanks for the feedback on your own pits! This is a blind that will have a maximum of 4 hunters in it. Wont be used as a commercial hunting blind or have a ton of traffic. I started with the 8' wide idea and thought that a 6' wide area allows for a 24" shooting deck and then 4' will be plenty of room for a bench and some hangars for coats/blindbags, etc. Would love to build it longer but really dont have the need for a 6 person blind and trying to keep the cost down since I'm going to be using such heavy materials already. Like you said, I only want to build this once. I'm also going to be building shooting holes into the roof above the platform instead of a full length opening that I'd have to conceal. The shooting holes will be a part of a large assembly that could be lifted off to open up the pit for install or removal of new equipment.
     
  8. Waterdog Trainer

    Waterdog Trainer Senior Refuge Member

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    Our 16 footers are set up for 5 holes. Keep in mind the finished inside diameter is less than 6' when using studs. Like when sitting on the bench you loose whatever width of stud you use.
     
  9. Jay Mo 37

    Jay Mo 37 Refuge Member

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    West Islip, NY
    We have 2 sliding doors that work well. Depending on what crop is in the field, the doors pretty easy to conceal. And one hole with a goose shell lifted up 3” for the look out.
     
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  10. JReid

    JReid New Member

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    I thought about it more after your first post. Going to 8’ deep really won’t add much cost since I’d be buying 8’ material to begin with. I think I’ll change my drawings to reflect that.
     

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