Wells

Discussion in 'Nebraska Flyway Forum' started by Jon-Barta, Dec 5, 2016.

  1. Siouxcitysmitty

    Siouxcitysmitty New Member

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    Oct 13, 2013
    Location:
    Nebraska
    JB, regarding your question "Have you tried running just the pump with out the blowers?"

    We've played around a bit with different combinations of the 3 items (well, and each of the 2 ice eaters) turned on/off while we're away from the property. Each of them on their own aren't able to keep much of a hole open. We started out with the 2 ice eaters before we put in the well, and they wouldn't do it. The well doesn't do it on it's own either, but, I think it's more of a distribution/circulation issue, and either the ice eaters, or something like the plumbing set up that fowlplay has, is probably critical.

    So, right now, we're just running one ice eater 24x7 that keeps a bit of a whole open, and then when we show up we turn on the well and the other ice eater, and it opens up a nice hole, usually over-nite.

    Of course, actual mileage varies, as many others have reported much better luck with just ice-eaters than we had. But, the well has absolutely made a huge difference for our set up.
     
  2. Husker

    Husker Senior Refuge Member

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    Mar 11, 2000
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    Omaha, NE
    That looks like a place up by Leshara.
     
  3. GANDER CO

    GANDER CO New Member

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    Aug 9, 2017
    Can someone tell me how to go about doing this thru the state? I have a farm up north of Lewellen and just put in a pond. The ground water table is going to be 3-5 down is all. I have irragation water when ever the canal is on but they shut that off in Oct.
     
  4. Jon-Barta

    Jon-Barta Senior Refuge Member

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    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    After many calls, emails, and searching I have found a few things. Wells are NOT CHEAP! IF you can find someone to even talk to you about a domestic well your going to be paying through the nose. You can get a permit for a well designated for "wildlife use" which means your only running it in the fall and the spring and not for ag use. Sounds like 6'' is the norm and what the 3 different drillers said I would want/need to pump 80-100 gpm. All of them said that about 120' for good water. I explained that this was not a potable water well, just needed it for the water temp and agitation and they all said thats about where the good gravel layer is to support 80+ gpm. It boggles my mind because the water table is right there, were basically hunting a wet meadow. After the initial sticker shock of the well, then you have the electrical and the plumbing fees added on top. Guess I am going to start digging up my penny jars in the back yard.
     
  5. Siouxcitysmitty

    Siouxcitysmitty New Member

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    Oct 13, 2013
    Location:
    Nebraska
    JB,

    Our experience in the panhandle 2 years ago was a little different than what you're describing above.

    Nebraska designates a "domestic well" that is limited to 50 gpm. No permit required, only "registration". Totally costs were $5.2K (we already had nearby access to electricity) and well depth is 30 feet. $1600 to drill and encase, and then $3600 for motor, pump, cable, etc., and we could've got by cheaper as we over-spec'd it a bit.

    Plumbing was minimal. We coupled 50' of fire-hose to the top of the well and dump the water on the backside of an ice-eater sitting in the pond. We turn the well off/on in the fuse panel in our nearby blind. That set up does a great job for our needs.

    The one caveat with ours is that 50 gpm really isn't enough to bring the water level up much. It only keeps it open and the water level fluctuates with the ground water table, which is fine for our set up. Maybe a deeper well and 80-100 gpm would provide that capability.
     
  6. Jon-Barta

    Jon-Barta Senior Refuge Member

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    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    Sioux, if I could get it done for that, it would have been done already! We have about 500' of power to run to the blind. I am assuming your pump is 220? I have one more shot, new company in town and hes working up a bid for me as we speak. Nice thing with this guy is hes a duck hunter himself so he knows what I will need/not need.
     
  7. Drakes Landing

    Drakes Landing Refuge Member

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    Jun 10, 2016
    A little off topic here but I would strongly suggest a thermostat control for your ice eaters. Really makes a difference on the electric bill. It kicks the ice eater on at a pre-determined temperature that you set. We just keep ours set at 32 degrees. When the temp dip bellows that the ice eater kicks on. Best $100 we ever spent. We also pump water late in the year and in my experience the birds prefer the pumped warmer water than that of a random ice eater out in the pool area. Bird use is probably 10 to 1 in the warm pumped water vs. the ice eater hole that is away from the pumped water discharge. If you can combine the two probably best of both worlds. Just a few considerations/thoughts.

    BTW..........if looking for a contact Rieschick Drilling out of Falls City, Nebraska has done all of our pump/drilling work in the past.

    Good luck.
     
  8. Jon-Barta

    Jon-Barta Senior Refuge Member

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    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    Drakes, thanks for the contact info but thats a long ways for them to be driving. We do run a thermostat on our ice eaters(kasco) and it helps with the bills, thats the truth. Our lake is only about 3-3.5 at the deepest and when it gets really cold the blower just wont keep enough water open for ducks.
     
  9. GANDER CO

    GANDER CO New Member

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    Aug 9, 2017
    I just got off the phone with Tim Sizer of Sizer well service. He will likely be doing mine and will be getting me a quote soon for a 4.5" casing 60' depth with a 3 hour pump.(guessing $5k will be close) He also gave me the info that you aren't "suppose" to discharge more then 50 gpm without a permit. With this set up I would likely be closer to 75 gpm. A gate valve on the discharge is an acceptable restriction. I have irragation water but the canal shuts off in October. I am looking to use the well to both "top off" the wetlands and pump water to open a hole after freeze.
    I had 500 trees planted this year and will do an additional 500 every year for the next 4 years.This is working with pheasants forever and NRD. Itd sure be handy to have a water source to irragate them off of as well.
     

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