Where to buy cork mallard dekes?

Discussion in 'Decoy Forum' started by Batman74, Nov 25, 2017.

  1. copperatiosu

    copperatiosu Senior Refuge Member

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    $90 is about average for a hand carved gunning block...I've paid as little as $25... And I have a $200 bird that will get hunted as least once... I hope one day you get the chance to hunt over a nice hand carved rig... And if ya ever come to Ohio you can hunt with me over mine...
     
  2. callinfowl

    callinfowl Kalifornia Forum

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    I'd love too, I guess I'm out of the loop as far as decoy costs go.
    I'm not a collector and there is no way in hell that I would pay $90 for one decoy, I don't care if it was the most realistic decoy ever made, ducks are dumb they get killed over black and white bleach jugs just as well or better than any decoy I have ever hunted over.:yes:yes:yes:tu
     
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  3. Tuleman

    Tuleman Elite Refuge Member

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    You may be missing the point. It's not that hand-carved cork decoys are more effective (they aren't), it's the special satisfaction one gets from hunting over a hand-carved/painted rig....especially if you are the one who did the carving/painting. I used to hunt exclusively over a 30-bird rig I carved and painted. I have a few left of that rig, but modern plastics are far easier to use on a day-to-day basis for me. The main reason I started carving my own was that, back in the 1980's, commercial decoys didn't look much like real ducks and only came in one position; straight up and straight ahead. So, my decoys were much more realistic. Today, ProGrades and Avian-X blocks are available in various body positions, are very realistic, lighter, more durable, cheaper, and don't take two months to acquire a dozen.
     
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  4. gwdecoys

    gwdecoys Elite Refuge Member

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  5. gwdecoys

    gwdecoys Elite Refuge Member

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    runamuckdecoys.com.
    This is the time to get them.
    For folks commenting about pricey gunning decoys, may I suggest you try making your own? There are a number of folks that would be more than happy to mentor new folks.
    The alternative? Plastic or foam. The one attractive aspect of hand made stuff is that it just doesn't look like the cookie cutter stuff on the market.
     
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  6. killerv

    killerv Elite Refuge Member

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    That's actually extremely cheap for a well made cork decoy. Jim does great work and could charge more if he wanted. You'd probably have a heart attack if I quoted you a price on one.

    George Williams does a great gunner too
     
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  7. Fsbirdhouse

    Fsbirdhouse Senior Refuge Member

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    There is the middle ground to consider as well.
    They may not be the foam blocks, wood, or the ultimate corks.
    But a lot of us find we can upgrade our spreads considerably, and partake of the heritage of decoy making in part by simply putting in the time to flock our decoys.
    No decoy manufacturer is putting out a decoy that even a first time novice can accomplish if he's willing to put in the time. These were from the first and only batch I have ever flocked. Do they draw more ducks? I only know they look fantastic in the field, and I've killed swarms of ducks over 'em
    Something to be said about having all the confidence in what you are hunting over, and a certain pride in knowing they are done by your own hand.
    IMG_1730.JPG
     
  8. Mean Gene

    Mean Gene Moderator Moderator Flyway Manager

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    $90 for a well made cork decoy is cheap. I'm finishing up 5 mallards for someone now: tan cork bodies, wood tails and bottom boards, wood keels, Homer heads, glass eyes, painted with Ronan oils and clear coated. The bodies, tails, bottom boards and neck joints are coated with thickened marine epoxy before being painted. We'll all be long dead and gone before they ever even think of wearing out. I sold them for considerable more than $90/ea. High end birds aren't for everybody, that's for sure. A decoy is really only worth what someone is willing to pay for them. Honestly, a guy just starting out can do cork birds that will bring in ducks for many years...they don't have to be works of art. Some guys want high end decoys, some want to hunt over stuff they built themselves, some guys don't care. Just do what you want and have fun. The fun part is the most important. :tu:tu
     
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  9. WHUP ! Hen

    WHUP ! Hen Elite Refuge Member

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    Over the past 30 years I have carved the birds we hunt over. I started with 18 Mallards and have added to the rig, Pintails, Widgeon, Gadwall, Green Wing Teal, Blue Wing Teal, 2 Black Ducks, 9 Coots and 7 drake Goldeneye. We never hunt with all of them, only what is flying at the time. After the hunt they have individual bags that they are stored in. Lot of trouble.......yes my my son and grandson don’t mind it at all. Since we hunt our own private land and we are going to hunt consecutive days we some time leave them out. As an antique decoy collector, they haven’t and will not be repainted, anal I guess.
     
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  10. Fsbirdhouse

    Fsbirdhouse Senior Refuge Member

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    Do any of you carvers flock you finished blocks, or is all about painting them?
     

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