Where to start

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by thatguy2, Jul 6, 2016.

  1. thatguy2

    thatguy2 Senior Refuge Member

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    Starting to think about a pond. I attached an overview. House is in the NW corner. Tiny pond east of the house that only holds water a few days after a rain. Don't think it began life as a pond.

    Buildings in the Sw corner are gone as is all the cedars along the roads and fence lines. A ditch separates my two fields and empties into a creek just off the property line. Where do you start with planning a pond? I am in a flyway and only a mile from a large lake.
     

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  2. smashdn

    smashdn Elite Refuge Member

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    NRCS Bio. Was it or is it current farmland? How long have you owned the property? Is any of it already involved in some form of easement or is any of it currently delineated as a wetland?

    Where are you located and how picky are the feds and local jurisdictions about permitting and such?
     
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  3. thatguy2

    thatguy2 Senior Refuge Member

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    Owned it for 2 year. It was farmed at some point, but not in the recent past. No easement or wetland delineated. It's in Kansas. These are our rules
    When building a new pond or refurbishing an old one, a landowner must obtain a permit from KDA’s Chief Engineer of the Division of Water Resources for the construction, operation and maintenance of any dam that is 25 feet or more in height, or six feet or more in height with the ability to store 50 acre-feet or more of water.

    The landowner must also file for a permit to appropriate water on impoundments built to retain 15 acre-feet or more of surface water. Water appropriation rights are obtained through the Division of Water Resources for a fee that is based upon the quantity of water for indirect use (evaporation loss from the surface of the water, and seepage loss). The minimum fee is $200. Without a water storage appropriation permit, the reservoir could be subject to removal, or required to be drained until a permit is obtained.
     
  4. JFG

    JFG Elite Refuge Member

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    What smashdn said, start with a NRCS biologist. They can provide technical and sometimes financial support in some cases. Have them come to the property and evaluate. There's no charge for this.

    Aside from proper permitting (if needed), the first thing you'll want to know is what type of soils you have. That alone will dictated where you can and can't build a pond due to seepage. Next is water source. Will you count on mother nature for water, drill a well, or pump from/stop up that creek? Utilizing a creek to flow "through" a pond (if allowable) would be very economical and provide you with water almost any time. You'll then want to look at your topography and elevations. How much of the natural vegetation do you want to use and/or incorporate into a pond? What depth(s) do you want it? Size? What type of birds will be utilizing it? Will it be a SAV, moist-soil or planted "pond"? These are just a few basic things I think you'd want to know for starters that should help you in your decision making process. Best of luck.
     
  5. smashdn

    smashdn Elite Refuge Member

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    15 acre feet is not much water really. Better get some help on the permit side from NRCS Bio. If you don't qualify for any of the programs at least bend their ear and get their opinion on how to lay it out and get the most bang for your buck.

    Do you have equipment? Tractor? What is the dozer rates in your area?
     
  6. thatguy2

    thatguy2 Senior Refuge Member

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    I have access to a small tractor and laser level. I have a SxS currently. Buddy used to build wetlands and ponds for USFWS. He says if I rent the dozer he would build it for free. I can rent a dozer for $1400 a week. Dozer rate from a dirt guy I was quoted 120/hr.

    Soil type is Kenoma silty loam but you hit clay about 3 ft down.
     
  7. thatguy2

    thatguy2 Senior Refuge Member

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    Sorry I remembered another thing but it wouldn't let me edit. I do have a well down in the SW corner near where the old buildings used to be. Wells in this area can only supply 10-100 gpm. I want to place a dam across the ditch. It recieves enough flow to supply a pond.
     
  8. CA Birdman

    CA Birdman Elite Refuge Member

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    How big is your property. What is your goal with pond. Place to hunt once a week or so. What is your budget. Drains so you can draw it down, plant food crops, etc. then flood.
     
  9. thatguy2

    thatguy2 Senior Refuge Member

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    I've only got 33.5 acres. I was more thinking a traffic pond. Also put fish in for the kids to go down and catch.

    Don't know on budget yet. Planning right now and wanted to see where it would come out.
     
  10. smashdn

    smashdn Elite Refuge Member

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    Do they deliver the dozer to your site?
     

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