Who's using a 28 guage?

Discussion in 'Upland Game Forum' started by duckpoop, Feb 1, 2006.

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  1. duckpoop

    duckpoop Senior Refuge Member

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    This kind of goes along with the previous thread. Who uses a 28 guage and how eeffective do you think they are? I see they offer a 1oz shell. That's as heavy as some of the 20guage shells.
    I found a nice little prize I'm looking at buying but I'm trying to legitimize the purchase.
     
  2. Ninetyvtwin

    Ninetyvtwin Senior Refuge Member

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    Like i said, i shoot a 28ga for ducks and brant. With bismuth shot and shots over decoys i have not lost a bird yet. Brant are a little bigger then mallards and they go down hard with the 28ga. I find i shoot better with the smaller ga's because your not reacting to the heavy recoil of a 12 ga. Understand though, the 28ga is not a gun i would use for divers on the edge of my decoys. I like shooting ducks when they are dropping or cupping into the decoys. Then i know i did my job right. Our brant are not the smartest birds here, they will land right next to you even if your standing in the decoys holding your boat. I really enjoy hunting with the smaller gauge guns.

    Mike
     
  3. Drathaar

    Drathaar Senior Refuge Member

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    It is surprising how effective they are. An added benefit is when on a day long Chuckar hunt, The gun and a box of ammo ways alot less and you're not at a disadvantage when you get into them. I have a Red Label and it's one of my favorites. For comparisson purposes, I own and regularly shoot everything from 28 to 10 guage. Each has their niche. But for upland hunting where there's alot of walking the 28 is my go to gun...
     
  4. D3Smartie

    D3Smartie Elite Refuge Member

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    i love using my 28 ga. I dont use it for chukars much because i dont want it to get dinged up but i do shoot a lot of quail and pheasants with it each year.
    it is light, quick and you can get on birds in a hurry. :tu
     
  5. SCTC

    SCTC Elite Refuge Member

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    My good buddy D3. While I agree a 28 would be a good gun for quail and doves, it should not be advocated for wild pheasants. It doesn't pack enough punch for consistent, clean kills. Wild pheasants are tough birds and are usually taken in thick, brushy areas that provide too many escape options if not cleanly killed. I have personally seen way too many cripples with that particular gauge of gun on wild pheasants and it makes me want to go take the gun from the person using it everytime I see it happen. Some folks can shoot it better than others and can minimize the number of cripple losses, but for the general population a 28 gauge is a very poor choice for wild pheasants and should not be advocated.
     
  6. richroux

    richroux Refuge Member

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    I agree, wild roosters take a lot of killing, with any gun. But, properly shot, choked(and patterned) and loaded, the 28 gauge can be a very effective gun even on late season wild pheasants. I didn't use mine on late season pheasants until I found a reload I was satisfied with. The slower 1 oz factory loads with unplated lead didn't seem quite enough. My choice is reloaded nickel-plated lead @ 1300 fps (from Lyman #4 manual). My O/U patterns that in #6 very well. My choice is to not take a first shot beyond what I think is 30 yards. Edit: Oops, forgot- - that 1300 fps is a 1 oz load.
     
  7. D3Smartie

    D3Smartie Elite Refuge Member

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    F'in spare me. Its not about what gun you are shooting, but its about making the shot. A chukar is a much tougher bird than a rooster to bring down, and yet with a clean shot, they can be brought down by any gauge. I have shot them with a .410.
    If you arent good enough to shoot pheasants with a 28 ga then dont. It is still a perfectly acceptable gun to shoot just about any bird with. The only two main birds i dont think it should be used on would be turkey and geese, but they could still do the job with a good shot.
     
  8. SCTC

    SCTC Elite Refuge Member

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    Exactly my point. The general population is not going to shoot a 28 gauge well enough to make consistent kills over the course of a season without producing a higher proportion of cripples than with a gun better suited to pheasants. I know very, very few guys that are good enough to shoot pheasants with 28 gauage and not cripple them. How many pheasants are you shooting a year to form the basis of your opinion? 5? 10? Are you shooting wild pheasants or those pen raised crappers provided by WDFW? If you aren't shooting at a lot of birds each year or are shooting released birds, then you haven't truly tested the gun to verify my point.

    Since when is a chukar a tougher bird than a pheasant? They may be harder to hit due to the conditions you end up shooting in, but not harder to kill if hit with the same load. I think you might want to stick with fishing if you're going to come up with ridiculous comments like that. You can kill birds with any light gauge gun you want to shoot, but over time, the cripple rate will be significantly higher than the heavier gauges. So touting the 28 as a pheasant gun is a disservice to the birds, in my opinion.
     
  9. D3Smartie

    D3Smartie Elite Refuge Member

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    First of all i am not advocating it for everyone. The question was posed as to who shoots one, and i do.

    As far as killing birds, for the 20 or so rooster i killed this year with my 28 it worked just fine. COUG could vouche for me on that point as he saw it in action a couple times. And everyone of the birds i shot with it was wild. I see no difference in cripple rate between my gun and the gun of others. In fact i would bet that i lose less birds than most. mainly because i know my gun, but isnt that the same with everyone? the opening day pheasant hunters that go once a year and dont shoot before are going to cripple more birds with their 12ga than i am with a 28. and honestly how many people shoot 28ga.s infrequently. Everyone that i know that has a 28 ga it is their go to upland gun. It packs the same velo. shot as a 12,16 or 20, just not as many of them.
    I never said it was a "pheasant gun" but it does kill pheasants just as well as a 12 ga when they are put in the middle of a pattern. Dead is dead. I am trying to find the pellet counts for 28ga vs. the others, but havent found it yet. if a bird gets 8 pellets from a 28 as opposed to 14 from a 12 ga it is still going to kill the bird. Like i said before it just comes down to making a good shot on the bird, not what gauge you are using.
    Maybe you should look into getting onto a chukar slope sometime if you dont think they are the toughest bird out there. I have yet to see a rooster fly off after being hit hard. I have seen plenty of chukars, while shoot a 12ga mind you, sail off after being pummled.
    the 2 toughest birds for their size IMO would be quail and chukars. they take more shot and keep going than any other bird i have seen.
     
  10. SCTC

    SCTC Elite Refuge Member

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    Good. We actually agree on something.

    Just as I thought. You aren't shooting enough birds each year to make it statistically significant for the cripple results that I'm talking about for the average 28 gauge shooter. You may and probably do shoot your gun better than the average hunter so you will see less of an impact. Start shooting hundreds of pheasants per year and you will see more of the cripple results that I'm talking about.

    Been on the chukar slope a number of times. Totally disagree with them being tougher than pheasants. But I do shoot a lot more pheasants than chukar in a given year so I've seen a lot of roosters fly off after being hit very hard. Not saying I'm right, I just know I've just seen a lot more pheasants take a load and keep flying than chukars. I shoot a lot of pheasants every year and they have the utmost respect from me. If the 28 works for you, great, but in my opinion it's definitely not the right gun for pheasants over the long haul. Awesome gun for quail, dove and woodcock, but I hope for the pheasant's sake it sees little time in the field shooting at them.
     
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