Woodcocks? Snipe? Wth?

Discussion in 'Upland Game Forum' started by TWOBIT, Jan 12, 2008.

  1. TWOBIT

    TWOBIT Senior Refuge Member

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    LKN, NC
    While on my annual Rabbit Hunt (yes, Rabbit Hunt) with the noblest, of what Paw-Paw called "Colored Folk".....I ran across many somethings I've never really seen in the wild...... in and around the Rabbit thickets on the back of my families old farm in the foothills of NC (50+ miles N of Charlotte - Central NC). I am going to have to call them a woodcock or some sort of snipe. They were in a grown over area that was logged out about 3 years ago.

    It's beak appeared to be 4-5" long and curved slightly down. It's flush was almost twice as noisy and shocking as that of a WILD bobwhite. A little larger bird than the bobwhite. Excellent flying skills in the densest of cover. The little beagles would flush these birds, but paid them and their scent NO attention. People would flush them up at ranges inside of 10-15ft - right on top you! My cousin (the only other white person out there), called them Woodcocks and wants to go back in there with one of his freinds pointers and setters from the game (Pin raised Quail, Pheasant & Chukars) preserve he is a member of in this area.

    What could these have been? Woodcock? Are they fairly common? We probably jumped around 25 of these creatures. I have shot plenty of Quail and a few phesant and am quite confident I could shot several of these birds today, but these little suckers had some moves when flushed.

    By the way....Rabbits.....15 jumped - 14 killed - 4 guns
     
  2. InAFrenzy

    InAFrenzy New Member

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    Vermont
    If they are woodcock, they are great birds to hunt with a pointing dog. We hunt them here in Vermont. They are a migratory upland bird and regulated by the Feds, similar to waterfowl. Typically a 30 day season, with a limit of 3. According to the NC regs I was able to find, today was the last day of the season there. Ours ended Nov. 4. If you have a chance to get after them with pointing dogs next year, they are a blast. They hold very tight for the dogs and are acrobats in the air.
     
  3. TWOBIT

    TWOBIT Senior Refuge Member

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    :mad: :mad: ....it appears that Woodcock season DID end TODAY in NC:mad:

    What are the odds these birds will return next year. I've covered every inch of this particular farm for 25+ years and can not recall ever seeing a single woodcock - then flushing up 25-30 today in a 15-20 acre area 150 to 200yds above a swamp/pond area.
     
  4. dakndug

    dakndug Moderator Moderator

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    Twobit, put the time on your calendar next year, they will be back for sure. Numbers depend on the hatch up north of course but they frequent the same areas year after year. Their timing may change by a couple weeks each way but they will be in there. They are a really fun bird to hunt over pointing dogs and do very good in the frying pan as well! :tu :tu

    Doug
     
  5. TWOBIT

    TWOBIT Senior Refuge Member

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    I have since done a little research on these birds. I took an old-timer out to the old farm this morning and we walked a few up - since there is NO Sunday hunting in NC and the Woodcock season in NC went out yesterday:eek: . He confirmed they were large Woodcocks - man, these birds are excellent flyers - I would love to give them a try with my little A5 Light Twenty.

    ....since we can not hunt them....I was thinking we would at least put the pointers on them for practice Monday AM before I return to the Outer Banks on Tuesday afternoon.

    DO Woodcocks really eat worms and grubs and still remain decent table fare as Dakndug mentioned?
     
  6. eastender

    eastender Elite Refuge Member

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    LI, NY
    Yes they do eat worms, and some of the old recipes suggested eating the intestines as a delicacy:eek:
    Great table fare with dark breast meat and white meat on the legs!
     
  7. Shredhead

    Shredhead Senior Refuge Member

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    Breasts taste to me like a cross between liver and steak. If you like liver, they are awesome.
     
  8. duckwho

    duckwho Senior Refuge Member

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    huntsville alabama
    they are fun birds to shoot and they will retur next year. They also very much resemble liver.

    I cant imagine how differnent my life would be if we were not allowed to hunt on Sunday.
     
  9. mike2355

    mike2355 Elite Refuge Member

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    canada
    we always get woodcock at my place. we have a bush with a huge grassy area in the back of it along with another huge bush. Every year we seem to get at least one woodcock. This year i shot at two but missed them, but we did manage two out of it while rabbit hunting.
     
  10. FullandFuller

    FullandFuller Elite Refuge Member

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    PA
    I agree they will probably be back next year in the same cover. I generally see them year to year in the same areas but here the season is only 25 days (4 weeks no sundays) and starts too early (~oct 14)...they are just getting here the last week of the season.

    They eat worms, like damp soil but not standing water, and some people find them hard to hit. They do have a unique taste and the french like to eat their guts (they have a long long intestine) called traille. They are not doing real well right now as a species but I shoot a few a year, that is enough.
     

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