Your First Amendment rights are under attack ? again.

Discussion in 'Political Action Forum' started by dubob, Oct 24, 2014.

  1. dubob

    dubob Senior Refuge Member

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    If this doesn?t frost your buttock, I don?t have a clue about what will. It is now going to be illegal to take pictures (already in place for 4 years) or videos on US Forest Service land for commercial use. You can see the proposal here: Proposed Directive for Commercial Filming in Wilderness; Special Uses Administration. You have until November 3, 2014 to comment on this asinine bovine excrement. Outfitters have already been threatened with fines for publishing images and videos because they promoted income producing enterprises. A day-care worker in Alaska was threatened for hosting a picnic for pre-school kids in a parking lot on public land because she was making income babysitting. This fecal matter is real folks. Our freedoms are slowly but ever so surely being eliminated by those bozos we keep sending to Washington DC.

    Please take advantage of the 10 days there are left to make a written comment on this proposal. And while you?re at it, it wouldn?t hurt a thing if you also wrote your bozos in Washington DC and let them know how you feel about this garbage.
     
  2. pintail2222

    pintail2222 Elite Refuge Member

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    If you're a professional production company and you want to film a movie - or set up a photo shoot - you need a permit. Nothing new. It has always been the case.

    Plus many States require permits - as well as counties & cities.

    Many production crews are voting w/ their feet & money and shooting film & footage in Canada.
     
  3. dubob

    dubob Senior Refuge Member

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    Does this strike you as being a professional production company - Outfitters have already been threatened with fines for publishing images and videos because they promoted income producing enterprises. A day-care worker in Alaska was threatened for hosting a picnic for pre-school kids in a parking lot on public land because she was making income babysitting.
     
  4. pintail2222

    pintail2222 Elite Refuge Member

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    No - it doesn't strike me as being professional production companies... And with incidents like that - their must be a report from a news source. But I can not find a corroborating source of the incidents you've mentioned.

    Do you have a link to any of the sources?

    Seems easy to do - I googled "day-care worker Alaska threatened hosting picnic pre-school kids" and "Outfitters fines publishing images videos income producing enterprises" But nothing...

    No news sources reporting or articles regarding the two incidents - just what you posted in http://www.bigfishtackle.com/cgi-bin/gforum/gforum.cgi?post=902126.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2014
  5. pintail2222

    pintail2222 Elite Refuge Member

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    But I did find this:

    http://www.king5.com/story/news/local/2014/09/26/media-doesnt-need-permit-to-film/16282817/

    So if news media don't need permits to film - I doubt a day-care worker in Alaska hosting a picnic for pre-school kids in a parking lot on public land does.

    However - if an outfitter hires a production company like http://www.stoneywolf.com/ it'd be the responsibility of the production company to pull proper permits & mode releases.


    SEATTLE (AP) - Faced with increasing criticism of a proposal that would restrict media filming in wilderness areas, the head of the U.S. Forest Service said late Thursday that the rule is not intended to apply to news-gathering activities.

    Chief Tom Tidwell says the rule would apply to commercial filming, like a movie production, but reporters and news organizations would not need to get a permit to shoot video or photographs in the nation's wilderness areas.

    He says the agency wants feedback to help make sure the rules are clear and consistent.

    Mickey Osterreicher, general counsel for the National Press Photographers Association, says the proposal is so vague that "the language does not reflect that intent."

    He says the agency needs to craft unambiguous language that exempts news-gathering.
     
  6. API

    API Political Action Forum Moderator Flyway Manager

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    For the clarification of all, when posting up a cut/paste, please include a reference/link to the information source.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  7. Steve Borgwald

    Steve Borgwald Elite Refuge Member

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  8. API

    API Political Action Forum Moderator Flyway Manager

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    Just another case of some looking for special treatment because they believe they merit an exception to the rules. For example, those hunting on public land typically must pay a day use fee, while birdwatchers will argue that they are entitled to view and photograph birds for free. Go figure. [emoji187]


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  9. dubob

    dubob Senior Refuge Member

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    My source is Sporting Classics Magazine Senior Editor Ron Spoomer. Reported in the November/December issue of said magazine as the first article in the 'This 'N That' section.
     
  10. API

    API Political Action Forum Moderator Flyway Manager

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    Thanks for the reference. As noted while drilling down from the the Sporting Classic Magazine header page, without a detailed link one must be a subscriber to access articles.
     

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