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Zebra Mussels now in the Susquehanna River

Discussion in 'Chesapeake Flyway Forum' started by yellowdog05, Jul 16, 2010.

  1. yellowdog05

    yellowdog05 Elite Refuge Member

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  2. Dinky

    Dinky Senior Refuge Member

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    Very Nice..............:( Knew it was a question of when vs. if
     
  3. derek

    derek Elite Refuge Member

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    No beuno.
     
  4. The Other David

    The Other David Elite Refuge Member

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    How much salinity can they handle?
     
  5. Super Swamper

    Super Swamper Moderator Moderator

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    Not much. We're most likely to see minor outbreaks in the tributaries, but each will probably be populated by boaters, because the larvae will likely die in the salt if simply spread out into the mainstem, then back up into a trib.

    This is a natural outcome of the way we do business on the water - especially re: bilge flush of international vessels. We were all idiotic to not be able to predict (or avoid) this 100, 50, or even 20 years ago. Of course, at every step of the way, the marine industry has claimed that flushing/emptying the bilge in deep international waters (instead of at anchorage in our tribs) would irreparably harm their business :doh And so now we have Dermo, MSX, watermilfoil, hydrilla, zebra mussels, etc etc.

    This gets into the whole "how bad ARE invasive species?" debate - there's no question that Eurasian Watermilfoil and Hydrilla are accelerating the cleanup of rivers in Maryland. Yes, they are occupying some valuable native baygrass habitat, but

    1) those baygrasses can't survive under current bay conditions
    2) native baygrasses are starting to show up WITHIN the beds of invasive baygrasses. Some biologists are going so far to say that the non-native species are like a nursery crop for the natives.
     
  6. Tad

    Tad Elite Refuge Member

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    Great info, SS! :tu
     
  7. dakndug

    dakndug Moderator Moderator

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    Well they did wonders to clean up the great lakes! So they can't be all bad. Yes they need controlled at the dams and such but I just don't see them all as being bad! But we'll see.

    Doug
     
  8. ButtonBuck

    ButtonBuck Elite Refuge Member

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    I thought the same thing when I read the OP. Zebra mussels, where they thrive and for better or worse, have turned waterways Gin clear over time. Since they can't spread into the Bay salinity wise, they might be a blessing in disguise.
     
  9. BuzzTheDecoys

    BuzzTheDecoys Elite Refuge Member

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    Maybe look at it two ways. They are a filter for sure but do hold toxins. It was believed for some time the decline in Bluebills was from feasting on them and being infected with said toxins. I think the study is still being conducted. But will they filter Amish cow dung ?
     
  10. ButtonBuck

    ButtonBuck Elite Refuge Member

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    Probably not, Zebra Mussels are devout Mennonites.
     

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